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Freestatetaxfiling

Freestatetaxfiling Index A Acontecimientos futuros, Acontecimientos futuros Administración del Seguro Social (SSA) Ayuda para radicar documentos ante la SSA , Ayuda para radicar documentos ante la SSA. Freestatetaxfiling Ajustes a los Formularios 941-PR, 944(SP) o 943-PR Ajustes del período en curso, Ajustes del período en curso. Freestatetaxfiling Ajustes de períodos anteriores a los Formularios 941-PR, 944(SP) o 943-PR, Ajustes de períodos anteriores Cambio en el proceso para hacer ajustes libres de intereses, Antecedentes. Freestatetaxfiling Excepciones a las correcciones de las contribuciones sobre la nómina libres de intereses , Excepciones a las correcciones de las contribuciones sobre la nómina libres de intereses. Freestatetaxfiling Planillas para ajustes en períodos anteriores, Planillas para ajustes en períodos anteriores. Freestatetaxfiling Proceso para hacer ajustes a las contribuciones sobre la nómina, Proceso para hacer ajustes a las contribuciones sobre la nómina. Freestatetaxfiling Recaudando las contribuciones retenidas de menos de los empleados, Recaudando las contribuciones retenidas de menos de los empleados. Freestatetaxfiling Reintegro de cantidades incorrectamente retenidas de los empleados, Reintegro de cantidades incorrectamente retenidas de los empleados. Freestatetaxfiling Ayuda contributiva, Cómo obtener ayuda relacionada con las contribuciones Ayuda provista por el IRS , Ayuda provista por el IRS. Freestatetaxfiling Ayuda relacionada con las contribuciones, Ayuda relacionada con las contribuciones. Freestatetaxfiling B Beneficios marginales, Retención y declaración de la contribución sobre beneficios marginales proporcionados a los empleados Cuándo se tratan los beneficios marginales como pagados al empleado, Cuándo se tratan los beneficios marginales como pagados al empleado. Freestatetaxfiling Depósito de la contribución sobre los beneficios marginales, Depósito de la contribución sobre los beneficios marginales. Freestatetaxfiling Regla especial en el caso de beneficios marginales proporcionados en noviembre y diciembre, Regla especial en el caso de beneficios marginales proporcionados en noviembre y diciembre. Freestatetaxfiling Retención de las contribuciones al Seguro Social y al seguro Medicare sobre los beneficios marginales, Retención de las contribuciones al Seguro Social y al seguro Medicare sobre los beneficios marginales. Freestatetaxfiling Valorización de vehículos proporcionados a los empleados, Valorización de vehículos proporcionados a los empleados. Freestatetaxfiling C Cálculo de las contribuciones al Seguro Social, al seguro Medicare y al FUTA , 9. Freestatetaxfiling Cálculo de las contribuciones al Seguro Social, al seguro Medicare y al FUTA Compensación por enfermedad, Pagos de compensación por enfermedad. Freestatetaxfiling Contribución Adicional al Medicare , Retención de la Contribución Adicional al Medicare. Freestatetaxfiling Contribuciones al Seguro Social y al Medicare , Contribuciones al Seguro Social y al Medicare. Freestatetaxfiling Contribuciones pagadas por el patrono, Contribución pagada por el patrono correspondiente al empleado. Freestatetaxfiling Deducción de la contribución, Deducción de la contribución. Freestatetaxfiling Patronos domésticos y agrícolas, Patronos domésticos y agrícolas. Freestatetaxfiling Calendario, Calendario Formulario 499R-2/W-2PR, Calendario Formulario 940-PR, Calendario Formulario 943-PR, Calendario Formulario 944(SP), Calendario Formulario 944-PR, Calendario Para el 28 de febrero, Calendario Para el 30 de abril, Calendario Para el 31 de enero, Calendario Para el 31 de julio, Calendario Para el 31 de marzo, Calendario Para el 31 de octubre, Calendario Clasificación errónea de empleados, Clasificación errónea de empleados. Freestatetaxfiling COBRA Crédito de asistencia para las primas COBRA , Recordatorios, Crédito de asistencia para las primas de COBRA. Freestatetaxfiling Comentarios y sugerencias, Recordatorios Compañías subsidarias calificadas conforme al subcapítulo S QSubs, Entidades no consideradas como separadas de sus dueños y compañías subsidarias calificadas conforme al subcapítulo S (QSubs). Freestatetaxfiling Compensación por enfermedad, Compensación por enfermedad Patronos Compensación por enfermedad procedentes de una compañía de seguros o de algún otro tercero pagador, Patronos. Freestatetaxfiling Terceros pagadores, Terceros pagadores. Freestatetaxfiling Contratación de nuevos empleados, Recordatorios Contratistas independientes, Contratistas independientes. Freestatetaxfiling Contribución Adicional al Medicare Retención de la Contribución Adicional al Medicare , Recordatorios Contribución Adicional al Medicare, ajustes a la retención, Ajustes a la retención de la Contribución Adicional al Medicare. Freestatetaxfiling Contribución al Seguro Social y al seguro Medicare por trabajo agrícola, 7. Freestatetaxfiling Contribución al Seguro Social y al seguro Medicare por trabajo agrícola El requisito de los $150 o $2,500, El requisito de los $150 o $2,500. Freestatetaxfiling Excepciones al requisito de los $150 o $2,500, Excepciones. Freestatetaxfiling Contribución al Seguro Social y al seguro Medicare por trabajo doméstico, 8. Freestatetaxfiling Contribución al Seguro Social y al seguro Medicare por trabajo doméstico Contribución FUTA , Contribución federal para el desempleo (contribución FUTA). Freestatetaxfiling Contribución sobre los ingresos de Puerto Rico, Contribuciones sobre los ingresos de Puerto Rico. Freestatetaxfiling Contribuciones al Seguro Social y al Medicare para 2014, Contribuciones al Seguro Social y al Medicare para 2014. Freestatetaxfiling Crédito contributivo por oportunidad de trabajo, Recordatorios D Defensor del Contribuyente, Servicio del Defensor del Contribuyente. Freestatetaxfiling Depósito de las contribuciones al Seguro Social y al seguro  Medicare, requisitos de Ajustes a las contribuciones del período retroactivo , Ajustes a las contribuciones del período retroactivo. Freestatetaxfiling Aplicación de los itinerarios mensuales y bisemanales, Aplicación de los itinerarios mensuales y bisemanales. Freestatetaxfiling Cuándo se tienen que hacer los depósitos, Cuándo se tienen que hacer los depósitos. Freestatetaxfiling Depósitos en días laborables solamente, Depósitos en días laborables solamente. Freestatetaxfiling Depósitos, cuándo se hacen, 11. Freestatetaxfiling Depósito de las contribuciones al Seguro Social y al seguro  Medicare Días feriados oficiales, Días feriados oficiales. Freestatetaxfiling Ejemplo de itinerario bisemanal, Ejemplo de itinerario bisemanal. Freestatetaxfiling Ejemplo de itinerario mensual, Ejemplo de itinerario mensual. Freestatetaxfiling Ejemplo de las reglas de depósito de itinerario mensual y bisemanal para patronos de empleados agrícolas, Ejemplo de las reglas de depósito de itinerario mensual y bisemanal para patronos de empleados agrícolas. Freestatetaxfiling Ejemplo de las reglas de depósito de itinerario mensual y bisemanal para patronos de empleados no agrícolas, Ejemplo de las reglas de depósito de itinerario mensual y bisemanal para patronos de empleados no agrícolas. Freestatetaxfiling Fecha compensatoria para una cantidad depositada de menos, Fecha compensatoria para una cantidad depositada de menos: Formularios 941-X (PR), 944-X (PR), 944-X (SP), 943-X (PR), Ajustes a las contribuciones del período retroactivo. Freestatetaxfiling Patronos de empleados agrícolas nuevos, Patronos de empleados agrícolas nuevos. Freestatetaxfiling Patronos nuevos, Patronos nuevos. Freestatetaxfiling Patronos que tienen empleados tanto agrícolas como no agrícolas, Patronos que tienen empleados tanto agrícolas como no agrícolas. Freestatetaxfiling Período de depósito, Período de depósito. Freestatetaxfiling Período de depósito de itinerario bisemanal que abarca 2 trimestres, Período de depósito de itinerario bisemanal que abarca 2 trimestres. Freestatetaxfiling Período retroactivo para patronos de empleados agrícolas, Período retroactivo para patronos de empleados agrícolas. Freestatetaxfiling Período retroactivo para patronos de empleados no agrícolas, Período retroactivo para patronos de empleados no agrícolas. Freestatetaxfiling Regla de depositar $100,000 el próximo día, Regla de depositar $100,000 el próximo día. Freestatetaxfiling Regla de depósito de itinerario mensual, Regla de depósito de itinerario mensual. Freestatetaxfiling Regla de la exactitud de los depósitos, Regla de la exactitud de los depósitos. Freestatetaxfiling Reglas para los depositantes de itinerario bisemanal, Reglas para los depositantes de itinerario bisemanal. Freestatetaxfiling Requisito de los $2,500, Requisito de los $2,500. Freestatetaxfiling Depósito electrónico Contribución federal, Recordatorios Depósitos de la contribución al Seguro Social y al seguro  Medicare, cómo se hacen, Cómo hacer los depósitos Cuando usted recibe su EIN , Cuando usted recibe su EIN. Freestatetaxfiling Depósitos hechos a tiempo, Depósitos hechos a tiempo. Freestatetaxfiling Opción de pago el mismo día, Opción de pago el mismo día. Freestatetaxfiling Reclamación de créditos por pagos en exceso, Reclamación de créditos por pagos en exceso. Freestatetaxfiling Registro de depósitos, Registro de depósitos. Freestatetaxfiling Requisito de depósito electrónico, Requisito de depósito electrónico. Freestatetaxfiling Dirección Cambio de dirección, Recordatorios Discrepancias entre los Formularios 941-PR or 944-PR y los Formularios 499R-2/W-2PR, Recordatorios E Elegibilidad para empleo, Elegibilidad para empleo. Freestatetaxfiling Empleado Definición, 2. Freestatetaxfiling ¿Quiénes son empleados? Estatutarios, Empleados estatutarios. Freestatetaxfiling Según el derecho común, Definición de empleado según el derecho común. Freestatetaxfiling Empleado doméstico Requisito de $1,900, Requisito de $1,900. Freestatetaxfiling Empleados Clasificación errónea de empleados, Clasificación errónea de empleados. Freestatetaxfiling Empleados arrendados, Empleados arrendados. Freestatetaxfiling Entidades no consideradas como separadas de sus dueños, Entidades no consideradas como separadas de sus dueños y compañías subsidarias calificadas conforme al subcapítulo S (QSubs). Freestatetaxfiling Exención, disposiciones de, Disposiciones de exención. Freestatetaxfiling Especialista en servicios técnicos, Especialista en servicios técnicos. Freestatetaxfiling F Formulario 499R-2/W-2PR, 13. Freestatetaxfiling Los Formularios 499R-2/W-2PR y W-3PR SS-5-SP, Recordatorios, Tarjeta de Seguro Social del empleado. Freestatetaxfiling SS-8PR, Ayuda provista por el IRS. Freestatetaxfiling W-3PR, 13. Freestatetaxfiling Los Formularios 499R-2/W-2PR y W-3PR Formulario 944-PR descontinuado, Recordatorios Fotografías de niños desaparecidos, Recordatorios FUTA Ley Federal de Contribución para el Desempleo (FUTA). Freestatetaxfiling , Ley Federal de Contribución para el Desempleo (FUTA). Freestatetaxfiling Reducción en el crédito contra la contribución FUTA , Estados o territorios con reducción en el crédito. Freestatetaxfiling G Gastos de viaje y de representación, Gastos de viaje y de representación. Freestatetaxfiling I Individuos que no son empleados estatutarios, Individuos que no son empleados estatutarios. Freestatetaxfiling Agentes de bienes inmuebles autorizados, Agentes de bienes inmuebles autorizados. Freestatetaxfiling Personas a quienes se les paga por acompañar y posiblemente cuidar a otras, Personas a quienes se les paga por acompañar y posiblemente cuidar a otras. Freestatetaxfiling Vendedores directos, Vendedores directos. Freestatetaxfiling Introducción, Introduction L Líder de cuadrilla agrícola, Líder de cuadrilla agrícola. Freestatetaxfiling Los Formularios 499R-2/W-2PR y W-3PR, 13. Freestatetaxfiling Los Formularios 499R-2/W-2PR y W-3PR Problemas con la radicación electrónica, Problemas con la radicación electrónica. Freestatetaxfiling Radicación de Formularios 499R-2/W-2PR ante el Departamento de Hacienda, Radicación de Formularios 499R-2/W-2PR ante el Departamento de Hacienda. Freestatetaxfiling Solicitud de exención de radicación de declaraciones informativas por medios electrónicos, Solicitud de exención de radicación de declaraciones informativas por medios electrónicos. Freestatetaxfiling M Mantenimiento de récords, Recordatorios Matrimonio Matrimonio entre personas del mismo sexo. Freestatetaxfiling , Qué hay de nuevo Medicare Retención de la Contribución Adicional al Medicare , Retención de la Contribución Adicional al Medicare. Freestatetaxfiling Medios electrónicos, pago y radicación por, Recordatorios Multas relacionadas con los depósitos de la contribución al Seguro Social y al seguro  Medicare , Multas relacionadas con los depósitos. Freestatetaxfiling Agentes de reportación, Agentes de reportación. Freestatetaxfiling Multa por recuperación del fondo fiduciario, Multa por recuperación del fondo fiduciario. Freestatetaxfiling Multa promediada por no depositar, Multa promediada por no depositar. Freestatetaxfiling Orden en que se aplican los depósitos, Orden en que se aplican los depósitos. Freestatetaxfiling Regla especial para los que radicaron el Formulario 944(SP) anteriormente, Regla especial para los que radicaron el Formulario 944(SP) anteriormente. Freestatetaxfiling N Negocio perteneciente y administrado por cónyuges, Negocio que pertenece y es administrado por los cónyuges Excepción: Negocio en participación calificado, Excepción: Negocio en participación calificado. Freestatetaxfiling Nómina Externalización de las obligaciones de la nómina, Recordatorios Outsourcing payroll duties , Recordatorios Número de identificación de contribuyente individual (ITIN), Número de identificación personal del contribuyente (ITIN) del IRS para extranjeros. Freestatetaxfiling Número de identificación patronal (EIN), 3. Freestatetaxfiling Número de identificación patronal (EIN) Número de identificación patronal en linea (EIN), solicitud de un, Recordatorios Número de Seguro Social Dónde se obtienen los formularios , Dónde se obtienen los formularios para solicitar un Número de Seguro Social. Freestatetaxfiling Número de Seguro Social (SSN) , 4. Freestatetaxfiling Número de Seguro Social (SSN), Tarjeta de Seguro Social del empleado. Freestatetaxfiling Escriba correctamente el nombre y número de Seguro Social del empleado, Escriba correctamente el nombre y número de Seguro Social del empleado. Freestatetaxfiling Tarjeta de Seguro Social del empleado, Tarjeta de Seguro Social del empleado. Freestatetaxfiling Verificación de los números de Seguro Social, Verificación de los números de Seguro Social. Freestatetaxfiling P Pago por medios electrónicos, Recordatorios Pagos con tarjeta de crédito o débito, Recordatorios Pagos que no se consideran salarios Empleado doméstico, Pagos que no se consideran salarios. Freestatetaxfiling Transportación (beneficios de transporte), Transportación (beneficios de transporte). Freestatetaxfiling Pagos rechazados, Recordatorios Pagos y depósitos de la contribución FUTA , 10. Freestatetaxfiling Pagos y depósitos de la contribución federal para el desempleo (la contribución FUTA) Depósitos, Depósitos. Freestatetaxfiling Empleados domésticos, Empleados domésticos. Freestatetaxfiling Formulario 940-PR, Formulario 940-PR. Freestatetaxfiling Tasa de la contribución, Tasa de la contribución FUTA. Freestatetaxfiling Trabajadores agrícolas, Trabajadores agrícolas. Freestatetaxfiling Parte responsable Cambio de parte responsable, Qué hay de nuevo Patrono, definición, 1. Freestatetaxfiling ¿Quién es patrono? Planillas para patronos Formulario 944(SP), Formulario 944(SP). Freestatetaxfiling Multas por no radicar y por no pagar, Multas o penalidades. Freestatetaxfiling Patrono sucesor, Patrono sucesor. Freestatetaxfiling Patrono sucesor, crédito especial, Crédito especial para un patrono sucesor. Freestatetaxfiling Patronos de empleados domésticos que declaran las contribuciones al Seguro Social y al Medicare , Patronos de empleados domésticos que declaran las contribuciones al Seguro Social y al Medicare. Freestatetaxfiling Patronos de trabajadores agrícolas, Patronos de trabajadores agrícolas. Freestatetaxfiling Patronos que no son patronos agrícolas, Patronos que no son patronos agrícolas. Freestatetaxfiling Planilla anual y pago de la contribución federal para el desempleo (contribución  FUTA), Planilla anual y pago de la contribución federal para el desempleo (contribución FUTA). Freestatetaxfiling Programa de acuerdo voluntario para la clasificación de trabajadores (VCSP), Programa para el acuerdo de clasificación voluntaria de trabajadores (VCSP, por sus siglas en inglés). Freestatetaxfiling Propinas, 6. Freestatetaxfiling Propinas Formulario 4070-PR, 6. Freestatetaxfiling Propinas Formulario 4070A-PR, 6. Freestatetaxfiling Propinas Informe de propinas, Informe de propinas. Freestatetaxfiling Recaudación de las contribuciones sobre las propinas, Recaudación de las contribuciones sobre las propinas. Freestatetaxfiling Regla de disposición, Regla de disposición. Freestatetaxfiling Q Qué hay de nuevo Contribuciones al Medicare para 2014, Qué hay de nuevo Contribuciones al Seguro Social para 2014, Qué hay de nuevo R Radicación por medios electrónicos, Recordatorios Radicar el Formulario 944(SP) en vez del Formulario 941-PR, Recordatorios Recordatorios, Recordatorios Récords, Recordatorios Reglas especiales para varias clases de servicios y de pagos, 15. Freestatetaxfiling Reglas especiales para varias clases de servicios y de pagos Retención de la contribución federal sobre ingresos, 14. Freestatetaxfiling Retención de la contribución federal sobre ingresos S Salarios sujetos a la contribución Compensaciones sujetos a la contribución, 5. Freestatetaxfiling Salarios y otra compensación Servicio del Defensor del Contribuyente, Servicio del Defensor del Contribuyente. Freestatetaxfiling Servicios de entrega privados, Recordatorios T Tarjetas de crédito o débito, pagos con, Recordatorios TAS , Servicio del Defensor del Contribuyente. Freestatetaxfiling Trabajo doméstico, Trabajo doméstico. Freestatetaxfiling V Veteranos calificados, contratación, Recordatorios Visa H-2A, Trabajadores agrícolas. Freestatetaxfiling Remuneración pagada a trabajadores agrícolas con visa H-2A, Recordatorios Prev  Up     Home   More Online Publications
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Consumer Protection Offices

City, county, regional, and state consumer offices offer a variety of important services. They might mediate complaints, conduct investigations, prosecute offenders of consumer laws, license and regulate professional service providers, provide educational materials and advocate for consumer rights. To save time, call before sending a written complaint. Ask if the office handles the type of complaint you have and if complaint forms are provided.

State Consumer Protection Offices

Illinois Office of the Attorney General - Carbondale

Website: Illinois Office of the Attorney General - Carbondale

Address: Illinois Office of the Attorney General - Carbondale
Consumer Fraud Bureau
601 S. University Ave.
Carbondale, IL 62901

Phone Number: 618-529-6400

Toll-free: 1-800-243-0607 (Fraud Hotline, IL) 1-866-310-8398 (in Spanish)

TTY: 1-877-675-9339 (IL)

Illinois Office of the Attorney General -Chicago

Website: Illinois Office of the Attorney General -Chicago

Address: Illinois Office of the Attorney General -Chicago
Consumer Fraud Bureau
100 W. Randolph St.
Chicago, IL 60601

Phone Number: 312-814-3000

Toll-free: 1-800-386-5438 (Fraud Hotline, IL) 1-866-310-8398 (in Spanish)

TTY: 1-800-964-3013 (IL)

Illinois Office of the Attorney General-Springfield

Website: Illinois Office of the Attorney General-Springfield

Address: Illinois Office of the Attorney General-Springfield
Consumer Fraud Bureau
500 S. 2nd St.
Springfield, IL 62706

Phone Number: 217-782-1090

Toll-free: 1-800-243-0618 (Fraud Hotline, IL) 1-866-310-8398 (in Spanish)

TTY: 1-877-844-5461 (IL)

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Regional Consumer Protection Offices

Chicago South Regional Office of the Attorney General

Website: Chicago South Regional Office of the Attorney General

Address: Chicago South Regional Office of the Attorney General
7906 S. Cottage Grove Ave.
Chicago, IL 60619

Phone Number: 773-488-2600

TTY: 1-866-717-8798

Chicago West Regional Office of the Attorney General

Website: Chicago West Regional Office of the Attorney General

Address: Chicago West Regional Office of the Attorney General
306 N. Pulaski Rd.
Chicago, IL 60624

Phone Number: 773-265-8808

TTY: 1-866-717-8804

East Central Illinois Regional Office of the Attorney General

Website: East Central Illinois Regional Office of the Attorney General

Address: East Central Illinois Regional Office of the Attorney General
1776 E. Washington St.
Urbana, IL 61802

Phone Number: 217-278-3366

TTY: 217-278-3371

Metro East Illinois Regional Office of the Attorney General

Website: Metro East Illinois Regional Office of the Attorney General

Address: Metro East Illinois Regional Office of the Attorney General
201 W. Pointe Dr., Suite 7
Belleville, IL 62226

Phone Number: 618-236-8616

TTY: 618-236-8619

Northern Illinois Regional Office of the Attorney General

Website: Northern Illinois Regional Office of the Attorney General

Address: Northern Illinois Regional Office of the Attorney General
Zeke Giorgi Center
200 S. Wyman St., Suite 307
Rockford, IL 61101

Phone Number: 815-967-3883

TTY: 815-967-3891

West Central Illinois Regional Office of the Attorney General

Website: West Central Illinois Regional Office of the Attorney General

Address: West Central Illinois Regional Office of the Attorney General
628 Maine St.
Quincy, IL 62301

Phone Number: 217-223-2221

TTY: 217-223-2254

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County Consumer Protection Offices

Cook County State Attorney's Office

Website: Cook County State Attorney's Office

Address: Cook County State Attorney's Office
Consumer Fraud Unit
69 W. Washington St., Suite 3130
Chicago, IL 60602

Phone Number: 312-603-8600 312-603-8700 (Consumer Line)

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City Consumer Protection Offices

Chicago Division of Business Affairs and Consumer Protection

Website: Chicago Division of Business Affairs and Consumer Protection

Address: Chicago Division of Business Affairs and Consumer Protection
121 N. LaSalle St., 8th Floor
City Hall
Chicago, IL 60602

Phone Number: 312-744-6060

TTY: 312-744-0246

Des Plaines Consumer Protection Commission

Website: Des Plaines Consumer Protection Commission

Address: Des Plaines Consumer Protection Commission
City Hall
1420 Miner St., 6th Floor

Des Plaines, IL 60016

Phone Number: 847-391-5006

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Banking Authorities

The officials listed in this section regulate and supervise state-chartered banks. Many of them handle or refer problems and complaints about other types of financial institutions as well. Some also answer general questions about banking and consumer credit. If you are dealing with a federally chartered bank, check Federal Agencies.

Department of Financial and Professional Regulation

Website: Department of Financial and Professional Regulation

Address: Department of Financial and Professional Regulation
Division of Banking
320 W. Washington St.
Springfield, IL 62786

Phone Number: 217-782-3000

Toll-free: 1-800-532-8785

TTY: 217-524-6644

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Insurance Regulators

Each state has its own laws and regulations for each type of insurance. The officials listed in this section enforce these laws. Many of these offices can also provide you with information to help you make informed insurance buying decisions.

Division of Insurance-Springfield

Website: Division of Insurance-Springfield

Address: Division of Insurance-Springfield
320 W. Washington St.
Springfield, IL 62767-0001

Phone Number: 217-782-4515

Toll-free: 1-877-527-9431 (Health Insurance) 1-866-445-5364 (Consumer Assistance Hotline)

TTY: 1-866-323-5321

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Securities Administrators

Each state has its own laws and regulations for securities brokers and securities - including stocks, mutual funds, commodities, real estate, etc. The officials and agencies listed in this section enforce these laws and regulations. Many of these offices can also provide information to help you make informed investment decisions.

Secretary of State

Website: Secretary of State

Address: Secretary of State
Securities Department
Jefferson Terrace
300 W. Jefferson St., Suite 300A
Springfield, IL 62702

Phone Number: 217-782-2256

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Utility Commissions

State Utility Commissions regulate services and rates for gas, electricity and telephones within your state. In some states, the utility commissions regulate other services such as water, transportation, and the moving of household goods. Many utility commissions handle consumer complaints. Sometimes, if a number of complaints are received about the same utility matter, they will conduct investigations.

Commerce Commission

Website: Commerce Commission

Address: Commerce Commission
Consumer Affairs
527 E. Capitol Ave.
Springfield, IL 62701

Phone Number: 217-782-2024

Toll-free: 1-800-524-0795 (IL)

TTY: 1-800-858-9277

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The Freestatetaxfiling

Freestatetaxfiling 25. Freestatetaxfiling   Nonbusiness Casualty and Theft Losses Table of Contents What's New Introduction Useful Items - You may want to see: CasualtyFamily pet. Freestatetaxfiling Progressive deterioration. Freestatetaxfiling Damage from corrosive drywall. Freestatetaxfiling Theft Loss on Deposits Proof of Loss Figuring a LossDecrease in Fair Market Value Adjusted Basis Insurance and Other Reimbursements Single Casualty on Multiple Properties Deduction Limits$100 Rule 10% Rule When To Report Gains and LossesDisaster Area Loss How To Report Gains and Losses What's New New Section C of Form 4684 for Ponzi-type investment schemes. Freestatetaxfiling  Section C of Form 4684 is new for 2013. Freestatetaxfiling You must complete Section C if you are claiming a theft loss deduction due to a Ponzi-type investment scheme and are using Revenue Procedure 2009-20, as modified by Revenue Procedure 2011-58. Freestatetaxfiling Section C of Form 4684 replaces Appendix A in Revenue Procedure 2009-20. Freestatetaxfiling You do not need to complete Appendix A. Freestatetaxfiling For details, see Losses from Ponzi-type investment schemes , in this chapter. Freestatetaxfiling Introduction This chapter explains the tax treatment of personal (not business or investment related) casualty losses, theft losses, and losses on deposits. Freestatetaxfiling The chapter also explains the following  topics. Freestatetaxfiling How to figure the amount of your loss. Freestatetaxfiling How to treat insurance and other reimbursements you receive. Freestatetaxfiling The deduction limits. Freestatetaxfiling When and how to report a casualty or theft. Freestatetaxfiling Forms to file. Freestatetaxfiling    When you have a casualty or theft, you have to file Form 4684. Freestatetaxfiling You will also have to file one or more of the following forms. Freestatetaxfiling Schedule A (Form 1040), Itemized Deductions Schedule D (Form 1040), Capital Gains and Losses Condemnations. Freestatetaxfiling   For information on condemnations of property, see Involuntary Conversions in chapter 1 of Publication 544, Sales and Other Disposition of Assets. Freestatetaxfiling Workbook for casualties and thefts. Freestatetaxfiling    Publication 584 is available to help you make a list of your stolen or damaged personal-use property and figure your loss. Freestatetaxfiling It includes schedules to help you figure the loss on your home, its contents, and your motor vehicles. Freestatetaxfiling Business or investment-related losses. Freestatetaxfiling   For information on a casualty or theft loss of business or income-producing property, see Publication 547, Casualties, Disasters, and Thefts. Freestatetaxfiling Useful Items - You may want to see: Publication 544 Sales and Other Dispositions  of Assets 547 Casualties, Disasters, and   Thefts 584 Casualty, Disaster, and Theft   Loss Workbook (Personal-Use  Property) Form (and Instructions) Schedule A (Form 1040) Itemized Deductions Schedule D (Form 1040) Capital Gains and Losses 4684 Casualties and Thefts Casualty A casualty is the damage, destruction, or loss of property resulting from an identifiable event that is sudden, unexpected, or unusual. Freestatetaxfiling A sudden event is one that is swift, not gradual or progressive. Freestatetaxfiling An unexpected event is one that is ordinarily unanticipated and unintended. Freestatetaxfiling An unusual event is one that is not a day-to-day occurrence and that is not typical of the activity in which you were engaged. Freestatetaxfiling Deductible losses. Freestatetaxfiling   Deductible casualty losses can result from a number of different causes, including the following. Freestatetaxfiling Car accidents (but see Nondeductible losses , next, for exceptions). Freestatetaxfiling Earthquakes. Freestatetaxfiling Fires (but see Nondeductible losses , next, for exceptions). Freestatetaxfiling Floods. Freestatetaxfiling Government-ordered demolition or relocation of a home that is unsafe to use because of a disaster as discussed under Disaster Area Losses in Publication 547. Freestatetaxfiling Mine cave-ins. Freestatetaxfiling Shipwrecks. Freestatetaxfiling Sonic booms. Freestatetaxfiling Storms, including hurricanes and tornadoes. Freestatetaxfiling Terrorist attacks. Freestatetaxfiling Vandalism. Freestatetaxfiling Volcanic eruptions. Freestatetaxfiling Nondeductible losses. Freestatetaxfiling   A casualty loss is not deductible if the damage or destruction is caused by the following. Freestatetaxfiling Accidentally breaking articles such as glassware or china under normal conditions. Freestatetaxfiling A family pet (explained below). Freestatetaxfiling A fire if you willfully set it or pay someone else to set it. Freestatetaxfiling A car accident if your willful negligence or willful act caused it. Freestatetaxfiling The same is true if the willful act or willful negligence of someone acting for you caused the accident. Freestatetaxfiling Progressive deterioration (explained later). Freestatetaxfiling Family pet. Freestatetaxfiling   Loss of property due to damage by a family pet is not deductible as a casualty loss unless the requirements discussed earlier under Casualty are met. Freestatetaxfiling Example. Freestatetaxfiling Your antique oriental rug was damaged by your new puppy before it was housebroken. Freestatetaxfiling Because the damage was not unexpected and unusual, the loss is not deductible as a casualty loss. Freestatetaxfiling Progressive deterioration. Freestatetaxfiling    Loss of property due to progressive deterioration is not deductible as a casualty loss. Freestatetaxfiling This is because the damage results from a steadily operating cause or a normal process, rather than from a sudden event. Freestatetaxfiling The following are examples of damage due to progressive deterioration. Freestatetaxfiling The steady weakening of a building due to normal wind and weather conditions. Freestatetaxfiling The deterioration and damage to a water heater that bursts. Freestatetaxfiling However, the rust and water damage to rugs and drapes caused by the bursting of a water heater does qualify as a casualty. Freestatetaxfiling Most losses of property caused by droughts. Freestatetaxfiling To be deductible, a drought-related loss generally must be incurred in a trade or business or in a transaction entered into for profit. Freestatetaxfiling Termite or moth damage. Freestatetaxfiling The damage or destruction of trees, shrubs, or other plants by a fungus, disease, insects, worms, or similar pests. Freestatetaxfiling However, a sudden destruction due to an unexpected or unusual infestation of beetles or other insects may result in a casualty loss. Freestatetaxfiling Damage from corrosive drywall. Freestatetaxfiling   Under a special procedure, you may be able to claim a casualty loss deduction for amounts you paid to repair damage to your home and household appliances that resulted from corrosive drywall. Freestatetaxfiling For details, see Publication 547. Freestatetaxfiling Theft A theft is the taking and removing of money or property with the intent to deprive the owner of it. Freestatetaxfiling The taking of property must be illegal under the laws of the state where it occurred and it must have been done with criminal intent. Freestatetaxfiling You do not need to show a conviction for theft. Freestatetaxfiling Theft includes the taking of money or property by the following means. Freestatetaxfiling Blackmail. Freestatetaxfiling Burglary. Freestatetaxfiling Embezzlement. Freestatetaxfiling Extortion. Freestatetaxfiling Kidnapping for ransom. Freestatetaxfiling Larceny. Freestatetaxfiling Robbery. Freestatetaxfiling The taking of money or property through fraud or misrepresentation is theft if it is illegal under state or local law. Freestatetaxfiling Decline in market value of stock. Freestatetaxfiling   You cannot deduct as a theft loss the decline in market value of stock acquired on the open market for investment if the decline is caused by disclosure of accounting fraud or other illegal misconduct by the officers or directors of the corporation that issued the stock. Freestatetaxfiling However, you can deduct as a capital loss the loss you sustain when you sell or exchange the stock or the stock becomes completely worthless. Freestatetaxfiling You report a capital loss on Schedule D (Form 1040). Freestatetaxfiling For more information about stock sales, worthless stock, and capital losses, see chapter 4 of Publication 550. Freestatetaxfiling Mislaid or lost property. Freestatetaxfiling   The simple disappearance of money or property is not a theft. Freestatetaxfiling However, an accidental loss or disappearance of property can qualify as a casualty if it results from an identifiable event that is sudden, unexpected, or unusual. Freestatetaxfiling Sudden, unexpected, and unusual events are defined earlier. Freestatetaxfiling Example. Freestatetaxfiling A car door is accidentally slammed on your hand, breaking the setting of your diamond ring. Freestatetaxfiling The diamond falls from the ring and is never found. Freestatetaxfiling The loss of the diamond is a casualty. Freestatetaxfiling Losses from Ponzi-type investment schemes. Freestatetaxfiling   If you had a loss from a Ponzi-type investment scheme, see: Revenue Ruling 2009-9, 2009-14 I. Freestatetaxfiling R. Freestatetaxfiling B. Freestatetaxfiling 735 (available at www. Freestatetaxfiling irs. Freestatetaxfiling gov/irb/2009-14_IRB/ar07. Freestatetaxfiling html). Freestatetaxfiling Revenue Procedure 2009-20, 2009-14 I. Freestatetaxfiling R. Freestatetaxfiling B. Freestatetaxfiling 749 (available at www. Freestatetaxfiling irs. Freestatetaxfiling gov/irb/2009-14_IRB/ar11. Freestatetaxfiling html). Freestatetaxfiling Revenue Procedure 2011-58, 2011-50 I. Freestatetaxfiling R. Freestatetaxfiling B. Freestatetaxfiling 849 (available at www. Freestatetaxfiling irs. Freestatetaxfiling gov/irb/2011-50_IRB/ar11. Freestatetaxfiling html). Freestatetaxfiling If you qualify to use Revenue Procedure 2009-20, as modified by Revenue Procedure 2011-58, and you choose to follow the procedures in the guidance, first fill out Section C of Form 4684 to determine the amount to enter on Section B, line 28. Freestatetaxfiling Skip lines 19 to 27. Freestatetaxfiling Section C of Form 4684 replaces Appendix A in Revenue Procedure 2009-20. Freestatetaxfiling You do not need to complete Appendix A. Freestatetaxfiling For more information, see the above revenue ruling and revenue procedures, and the Instructions for Form 4684. Freestatetaxfiling   If you choose not to use the procedures in Revenue Procedure 2009-20, you may claim your theft loss by filling out Section B, lines 19 to 39, as appropriate. Freestatetaxfiling Loss on Deposits A loss on deposits can occur when a bank, credit union, or other financial institution becomes insolvent or bankrupt. Freestatetaxfiling If you incurred this type of loss, you can choose one of the following ways to deduct the loss. Freestatetaxfiling As a casualty loss. Freestatetaxfiling As an ordinary loss. Freestatetaxfiling As a nonbusiness bad debt. Freestatetaxfiling Casualty loss or ordinary loss. Freestatetaxfiling   You can choose to deduct a loss on deposits as a casualty loss or as an ordinary loss for any year in which you can reasonably estimate how much of your deposits you have lost in an insolvent or bankrupt financial institution. Freestatetaxfiling The choice is generally made on the return you file for that year and applies to all your losses on deposits for the year in that particular financial institution. Freestatetaxfiling If you treat the loss as a casualty or ordinary loss, you cannot treat the same amount of the loss as a nonbusiness bad debt when it actually becomes worthless. Freestatetaxfiling However, you can take a nonbusiness bad debt deduction for any amount of loss that is more than the estimated amount you deducted as a casualty or ordinary loss. Freestatetaxfiling Once you make this choice, you cannot change it without permission from the Internal Revenue Service. Freestatetaxfiling   If you claim an ordinary loss, report it as a miscellaneous itemized deduction on Schedule A (Form 1040), line 23. Freestatetaxfiling The maximum amount you can claim is $20,000 ($10,000 if you are married filing separately) reduced by any expected state insurance proceeds. Freestatetaxfiling Your loss is subject to the 2%-of-adjusted-gross-income limit. Freestatetaxfiling You cannot choose to claim an ordinary loss if any part of the deposit is federally insured. Freestatetaxfiling Nonbusiness bad debt. Freestatetaxfiling   If you do not choose to deduct the loss as a casualty loss or as an ordinary loss, you must wait until the year the actual loss is determined and deduct the loss as a nonbusiness bad debt in that year. Freestatetaxfiling How to report. Freestatetaxfiling   The kind of deduction you choose for your loss on deposits determines how you report your loss. Freestatetaxfiling If you choose: Casualty loss — report it on Form 4684 first and then on Schedule A (Form 1040). Freestatetaxfiling Ordinary loss — report it on Schedule A (Form 1040) as a miscellaneous itemized deduction. Freestatetaxfiling Nonbusiness bad debt — report it on Form 8949 first and then on Schedule D (Form 1040). Freestatetaxfiling More information. Freestatetaxfiling   For more information, see Special Treatment for Losses on Deposits in Insolvent or Bankrupt Financial Institutions in the Instructions for Form 4684 or Deposit in Insolvent or Bankrupt Financial Institution in Publication 550. Freestatetaxfiling Proof of Loss To deduct a casualty or theft loss, you must be able to prove that you had a casualty or theft. Freestatetaxfiling You also must be able to support the amount you take as a deduction. Freestatetaxfiling Casualty loss proof. Freestatetaxfiling   For a casualty loss, your records should show all the following. Freestatetaxfiling The type of casualty (car accident, fire, storm, etc. Freestatetaxfiling ) and when it occurred. Freestatetaxfiling That the loss was a direct result of the casualty. Freestatetaxfiling That you were the owner of the property or, if you leased the property from someone else, that you were contractually liable to the owner for the damage. Freestatetaxfiling Whether a claim for reimbursement exists for which there is a reasonable expectation of recovery. Freestatetaxfiling Theft loss proof. Freestatetaxfiling   For a theft loss, your records should show all the following. Freestatetaxfiling When you discovered that your property was missing. Freestatetaxfiling That your property was stolen. Freestatetaxfiling That you were the owner of the property. Freestatetaxfiling Whether a claim for reimbursement exists for which there is a reasonable expectation of recovery. Freestatetaxfiling It is important that you have records that will prove your deduction. Freestatetaxfiling If you do not have the actual records to support your deduction, you can use other satisfactory evidence to support it. Freestatetaxfiling Figuring a Loss Figure the amount of your loss using the following steps. Freestatetaxfiling Determine your adjusted basis in the property before the casualty or theft. Freestatetaxfiling Determine the decrease in fair market value of the property as a result of the casualty or theft. Freestatetaxfiling From the smaller of the amounts you determined in (1) and (2), subtract any insurance or other reimbursement you received or expect to receive. Freestatetaxfiling For personal-use property and property used in performing services as an employee, apply the deduction limits, discussed later, to determine the amount of your deductible loss. Freestatetaxfiling Gain from reimbursement. Freestatetaxfiling   If your reimbursement is more than your adjusted basis in the property, you have a gain. Freestatetaxfiling This is true even if the decrease in the FMV of the property is smaller than your adjusted basis. Freestatetaxfiling If you have a gain, you may have to pay tax on it, or you may be able to postpone reporting the gain. Freestatetaxfiling See Publication 547 for more information on how to treat a gain from a reimbursement for a casualty or theft. Freestatetaxfiling Leased property. Freestatetaxfiling   If you are liable for casualty damage to property you lease, your loss is the amount you must pay to repair the property minus any insurance or other reimbursement you receive or expect to receive. Freestatetaxfiling Decrease in Fair Market Value Fair market value (FMV) is the price for which you could sell your property to a willing buyer when neither of you has to sell or buy and both of you know all the relevant facts. Freestatetaxfiling The decrease in FMV used to figure the amount of a casualty or theft loss is the difference between the property's fair market value immediately before and immediately after the casualty or theft. Freestatetaxfiling FMV of stolen property. Freestatetaxfiling   The FMV of property immediately after a theft is considered to be zero, since you no longer have the property. Freestatetaxfiling Example. Freestatetaxfiling Several years ago, you purchased silver dollars at face value for $150. Freestatetaxfiling This is your adjusted basis in the property. Freestatetaxfiling Your silver dollars were stolen this year. Freestatetaxfiling The FMV of the coins was $1,000 just before they were stolen, and insurance did not cover them. Freestatetaxfiling Your theft loss is $150. Freestatetaxfiling Recovered stolen property. Freestatetaxfiling   Recovered stolen property is your property that was stolen and later returned to you. Freestatetaxfiling If you recovered property after you had already taken a theft loss deduction, you must refigure your loss using the smaller of the property's adjusted basis (explained later) or the decrease in FMV from the time just before it was stolen until the time it was recovered. Freestatetaxfiling Use this amount to refigure your total loss for the year in which the loss was deducted. Freestatetaxfiling   If your refigured loss is less than the loss you deducted, you generally have to report the difference as income in the recovery year. Freestatetaxfiling But report the difference only up to the amount of the loss that reduced your tax. Freestatetaxfiling For more information on the amount to report, see Recoveries in chapter 12. Freestatetaxfiling Figuring Decrease in FMV— Items To Consider To figure the decrease in FMV because of a casualty or theft, you generally need a competent appraisal. Freestatetaxfiling However, other measures can also be used to establish certain decreases. Freestatetaxfiling Appraisal. Freestatetaxfiling   An appraisal to determine the difference between the FMV of the property immediately before a casualty or theft and immediately afterward should be made by a competent appraiser. Freestatetaxfiling The appraiser must recognize the effects of any general market decline that may occur along with the casualty. Freestatetaxfiling This information is needed to limit any deduction to the actual loss resulting from damage to the property. Freestatetaxfiling   Several factors are important in evaluating the accuracy of an appraisal, including the following. Freestatetaxfiling The appraiser's familiarity with your property before and after the casualty or theft. Freestatetaxfiling The appraiser's knowledge of sales of comparable property in the area. Freestatetaxfiling The appraiser's knowledge of conditions in the area of the casualty. Freestatetaxfiling The appraiser's method of appraisal. Freestatetaxfiling    You may be able to use an appraisal that you used to get a federal loan (or a federal loan guarantee) as the result of a federally declared disaster to establish the amount of your disaster loss. Freestatetaxfiling For more information on disasters, see Disaster Area Losses, in Pub. Freestatetaxfiling 547. Freestatetaxfiling Cost of cleaning up or making repairs. Freestatetaxfiling   The cost of repairing damaged property is not part of a casualty loss. Freestatetaxfiling Neither is the cost of cleaning up after a casualty. Freestatetaxfiling But you can use the cost of cleaning up or making repairs after a casualty as a measure of the decrease in FMV if you meet all the following conditions. Freestatetaxfiling The repairs are actually made. Freestatetaxfiling The repairs are necessary to bring the property back to its condition before the casualty. Freestatetaxfiling The amount spent for repairs is not excessive. Freestatetaxfiling The repairs take care of the damage only. Freestatetaxfiling The value of the property after the repairs is not, due to the repairs, more than the value of the property before the casualty. Freestatetaxfiling Landscaping. Freestatetaxfiling   The cost of restoring landscaping to its original condition after a casualty may indicate the decrease in FMV. Freestatetaxfiling You may be able to measure your loss by what you spend on the following. Freestatetaxfiling Removing destroyed or damaged trees and shrubs minus any salvage you receive. Freestatetaxfiling Pruning and other measures taken to preserve damaged trees and shrubs. Freestatetaxfiling Replanting necessary to restore the property to its approximate value before the casualty. Freestatetaxfiling Car value. Freestatetaxfiling    Books issued by various automobile organizations that list your car may be useful in figuring the value of your car. Freestatetaxfiling You can use the book's retail values and modify them by such factors as mileage and the condition of your car to figure its value. Freestatetaxfiling The prices are not official, but they may be useful in determining value and suggesting relative prices for comparison with current sales and offerings in your area. Freestatetaxfiling If your car is not listed in the books, determine its value from other sources. Freestatetaxfiling A dealer's offer for your car as a trade-in on a new car is not usually a measure of its true value. Freestatetaxfiling Figuring Decrease in FMV— Items Not To Consider You generally should not consider the following items when attempting to establish the decrease in FMV of your property. Freestatetaxfiling Cost of protection. Freestatetaxfiling   The cost of protecting your property against a casualty or theft is not part of a casualty or theft loss. Freestatetaxfiling The amount you spend on insurance or to board up your house against a storm is not part of your loss. Freestatetaxfiling   If you make permanent improvements to your property to protect it against a casualty or theft, add the cost of these improvements to your basis in the property. Freestatetaxfiling An example would be the cost of a dike to prevent flooding. Freestatetaxfiling Exception. Freestatetaxfiling   You cannot increase your basis in the property by, or deduct as a business expense, any expenditures you made with respect to qualified disaster mitigation payments. Freestatetaxfiling See Disaster Area Losses in Publication 547. Freestatetaxfiling Incidental expenses. Freestatetaxfiling   Any incidental expenses you have due to a casualty or theft, such as expenses for the treatment of personal injuries, for temporary housing, or for a rental car, are not part of your casualty or theft loss. Freestatetaxfiling Replacement cost. Freestatetaxfiling   The cost of replacing stolen or destroyed property is not part of a casualty or theft loss. Freestatetaxfiling Sentimental value. Freestatetaxfiling   Do not consider sentimental value when determining your loss. Freestatetaxfiling If a family portrait, heirloom, or keepsake is damaged, destroyed, or stolen, you must base your loss on its FMV, as limited by your adjusted basis in the property. Freestatetaxfiling Decline in market value of property in or near casualty area. Freestatetaxfiling   A decrease in the value of your property because it is in or near an area that suffered a casualty, or that might again suffer a casualty, is not to be taken into consideration. Freestatetaxfiling You have a loss only for actual casualty damage to your property. Freestatetaxfiling However, if your home is in a federally declared disaster area, see Disaster Area Losses in Publication 547. Freestatetaxfiling Costs of photographs and appraisals. Freestatetaxfiling    Photographs taken after a casualty will be helpful in establishing the condition and value of the property after it was damaged. Freestatetaxfiling Photographs showing the condition of the property after it was repaired, restored, or replaced may also be helpful. Freestatetaxfiling    Appraisals are used to figure the decrease in FMV because of a casualty or theft. Freestatetaxfiling See Appraisal , earlier, under Figuring Decrease in FMV — Items To Consider, for information about appraisals. Freestatetaxfiling   The costs of photographs and appraisals used as evidence of the value and condition of property damaged as a result of a casualty are not a part of the loss. Freestatetaxfiling You can claim these costs as a miscellaneous itemized deduction subject to the 2%-of-adjusted-gross-income limit on Schedule A (Form 1040). Freestatetaxfiling For information about miscellaneous deductions, see chapter 28. Freestatetaxfiling Adjusted Basis Adjusted basis is your basis in the property (usually cost) increased or decreased by various events, such as improvements and casualty losses. Freestatetaxfiling For more information, see chapter 13. Freestatetaxfiling Insurance and Other Reimbursements If you receive an insurance payment or other type of reimbursement, you must subtract the reimbursement when you figure your loss. Freestatetaxfiling You do not have a casualty or theft loss to the extent you are reimbursed. Freestatetaxfiling If you expect to be reimbursed for part or all of your loss, you must subtract the expected reimbursement when you figure your loss. Freestatetaxfiling You must reduce your loss even if you do not receive payment until a later tax year. Freestatetaxfiling See Reimbursement Received After Deducting Loss , later. Freestatetaxfiling Failure to file a claim for reimbursement. Freestatetaxfiling   If your property is covered by insurance, you must file a timely insurance claim for reimbursement of your loss. Freestatetaxfiling Otherwise, you cannot deduct this loss as a casualty or theft loss. Freestatetaxfiling However, this rule does not apply to the portion of the loss not covered by insurance (for example, a deductible). Freestatetaxfiling Example. Freestatetaxfiling You have a car insurance policy with a $1,000 deductible. Freestatetaxfiling Because your insurance did not cover the first $1,000 of an auto collision, the $1,000 would be deductible (subject to the deduction limits discussed later). Freestatetaxfiling This is true even if you do not file an insurance claim, because your insurance policy would never have reimbursed you for the deductible. Freestatetaxfiling Types of Reimbursements The most common type of reimbursement is an insurance payment for your stolen or damaged property. Freestatetaxfiling Other types of reimbursements are discussed next. Freestatetaxfiling Also see the Instructions for Form 4684. Freestatetaxfiling Employer's emergency disaster fund. Freestatetaxfiling   If you receive money from your employer's emergency disaster fund and you must use that money to rehabilitate or replace property on which you are claiming a casualty loss deduction, you must take that money into consideration in computing the casualty loss deduction. Freestatetaxfiling Take into consideration only the amount you used to replace your destroyed or damaged property. Freestatetaxfiling Example. Freestatetaxfiling Your home was extensively damaged by a tornado. Freestatetaxfiling Your loss after reimbursement from your insurance company was $10,000. Freestatetaxfiling Your employer set up a disaster relief fund for its employees. Freestatetaxfiling Employees receiving money from the fund had to use it to rehabilitate or replace their damaged or destroyed property. Freestatetaxfiling You received $4,000 from the fund and spent the entire amount on repairs to your home. Freestatetaxfiling In figuring your casualty loss, you must reduce your unreimbursed loss ($10,000) by the $4,000 you received from your employer's fund. Freestatetaxfiling Your casualty loss before applying the deduction limits discussed later is $6,000. Freestatetaxfiling Cash gifts. Freestatetaxfiling   If you receive excludable cash gifts as a disaster victim and there are no limits on how you can use the money, you do not reduce your casualty loss by these excludable cash gifts. Freestatetaxfiling This applies even if you use the money to pay for repairs to property damaged in the disaster. Freestatetaxfiling Example. Freestatetaxfiling Your home was damaged by a hurricane. Freestatetaxfiling Relatives and neighbors made cash gifts to you that were excludable from your income. Freestatetaxfiling You used part of the cash gifts to pay for repairs to your home. Freestatetaxfiling There were no limits or restrictions on how you could use the cash gifts. Freestatetaxfiling Because it was an excludable gift, the money you received and used to pay for repairs to your home does not reduce your casualty loss on the damaged home. Freestatetaxfiling Insurance payments for living expenses. Freestatetaxfiling   You do not reduce your casualty loss by insurance payments you receive to cover living expenses in either of the following situations. Freestatetaxfiling You lose the use of your main home because of a casualty. Freestatetaxfiling Government authorities do not allow you access to your main home because of a casualty or threat of one. Freestatetaxfiling Inclusion in income. Freestatetaxfiling   If these insurance payments are more than the temporary increase in your living expenses, you must include the excess in your income. Freestatetaxfiling Report this amount on Form 1040, line 21. Freestatetaxfiling However, if the casualty occurs in a federally declared disaster area, none of the insurance payments are taxable. Freestatetaxfiling See Qualified disaster relief payments, under Disaster Area Losses in Publication 547. Freestatetaxfiling   A temporary increase in your living expenses is the difference between the actual living expenses you and your family incurred during the period you could not use your home and your normal living expenses for that period. Freestatetaxfiling Actual living expenses are the reasonable and necessary expenses incurred because of the loss of your main home. Freestatetaxfiling Generally, these expenses include the amounts you pay for the following. Freestatetaxfiling Rent for suitable housing. Freestatetaxfiling Transportation. Freestatetaxfiling Food. Freestatetaxfiling Utilities. Freestatetaxfiling Miscellaneous services. Freestatetaxfiling Normal living expenses consist of these same expenses that you would have incurred but did not because of the casualty or the threat of one. Freestatetaxfiling Example. Freestatetaxfiling As a result of a fire, you vacated your apartment for a month and moved to a motel. Freestatetaxfiling You normally pay $525 a month for rent. Freestatetaxfiling None was charged for the month the apartment was vacated. Freestatetaxfiling Your motel rent for this month was $1,200. Freestatetaxfiling You normally pay $200 a month for food. Freestatetaxfiling Your food expenses for the month you lived in the motel were $400. Freestatetaxfiling You received $1,100 from your insurance company to cover your living expenses. Freestatetaxfiling You determine the payment you must include in income as follows. Freestatetaxfiling 1) Insurance payment for living expenses $1,100 2) Actual expenses during the month you are unable to use your home because of fire 1,600   3) Normal living expenses 725   4) Temporary increase in living  expenses: Subtract line 3 from line 2 875 5) Amount of payment includible  in income: Subtract line 4  from line 1 $ 225 Tax year of inclusion. Freestatetaxfiling   You include the taxable part of the insurance payment in income for the year you regain the use of your main home or, if later, for the year you receive the taxable part of the insurance payment. Freestatetaxfiling Example. Freestatetaxfiling Your main home was destroyed by a tornado in August 2011. Freestatetaxfiling You regained use of your home in November 2012. Freestatetaxfiling The insurance payments you received in 2011 and 2012 were $1,500 more than the temporary increase in your living expenses during those years. Freestatetaxfiling You include this amount in income on your 2012 Form 1040. Freestatetaxfiling If, in 2013, you receive further payments to cover the living expenses you had in 2011 and 2012, you must include those payments in income on your 2013 Form 1040. Freestatetaxfiling Disaster relief. Freestatetaxfiling   Food, medical supplies, and other forms of assistance you receive do not reduce your casualty loss unless they are replacements for lost or destroyed property. Freestatetaxfiling Qualified disaster relief payments you receive for expenses you incurred as a result of a federally declared disaster are not taxable income to you. Freestatetaxfiling For more information, see Disaster Area Losses in Publication 547. Freestatetaxfiling Disaster unemployment assistance payments are unemployment benefits that are taxable. Freestatetaxfiling Generally, disaster relief grants and qualified disaster mitigation payments made under the Robert T. Freestatetaxfiling Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act or the National Flood Insurance Act (as in effect on April 15, 2005) are not includible in your income. Freestatetaxfiling See Disaster Area Losses in Publication 547. Freestatetaxfiling Reimbursement Received After Deducting Loss If you figured your casualty or theft loss using your expected reimbursement, you may have to adjust your tax return for the tax year in which you receive your actual reimbursement. Freestatetaxfiling This section explains the adjustment you may have to make. Freestatetaxfiling Actual reimbursement less than expected. Freestatetaxfiling   If you later receive less reimbursement than you expected, include that difference as a loss with your other losses (if any) on your return for the year in which you can reasonably expect no more reimbursement. Freestatetaxfiling Example. Freestatetaxfiling Your personal car had an FMV of $2,000 when it was destroyed in a collision with another car in 2012. Freestatetaxfiling The accident was due to the negligence of the other driver. Freestatetaxfiling At the end of 2012, there was a reasonable prospect that the owner of the other car would reimburse you in full. Freestatetaxfiling You did not have a deductible loss in 2012. Freestatetaxfiling In January 2013, the court awarded you a judgment of $2,000. Freestatetaxfiling However, in July it became apparent that you will be unable to collect any amount from the other driver. Freestatetaxfiling You can deduct the loss in 2013 subject to the limits discussed later. Freestatetaxfiling Actual reimbursement more than expected. Freestatetaxfiling   If you later receive more reimbursement than you expected after you claimed a deduction for the loss, you may have to include the extra reimbursement in your income for the year you receive it. Freestatetaxfiling However, if any part of the original deduction did not reduce your tax for the earlier year, do not include that part of the reimbursement in your income. Freestatetaxfiling You do not refigure your tax for the year you claimed the deduction. Freestatetaxfiling For more information, see Recoveries in chapter 12. Freestatetaxfiling If the total of all the reimbursements you receive is more than your adjusted basis in the destroyed or stolen property, you will have a gain on the casualty or theft. Freestatetaxfiling If you have already taken a deduction for a loss and you receive the reimbursement in a later year, you may have to include the gain in your income for the later year. Freestatetaxfiling Include the gain as ordinary income up to the amount of your deduction that reduced your tax for the earlier year. Freestatetaxfiling See Figuring a Gain in Publication 547 for more information on how to treat a gain from the reimbursement of a casualty or theft. Freestatetaxfiling Actual reimbursement same as expected. Freestatetaxfiling   If you receive exactly the reimbursement you expected to receive, you do not have to include any of the reimbursement in your income and you cannot deduct any additional loss. Freestatetaxfiling Example. Freestatetaxfiling In December 2013, you had a collision while driving your personal car. Freestatetaxfiling Repairs to the car cost $950. Freestatetaxfiling You had $100 deductible collision insurance. Freestatetaxfiling Your insurance company agreed to reimburse you for the rest of the damage. Freestatetaxfiling Because you expected a reimbursement from the insurance company, you did not have a casualty loss deduction in 2013. Freestatetaxfiling Due to the $100 rule (discussed later under Deduction Limits ), you cannot deduct the $100 you paid as the deductible. Freestatetaxfiling When you receive the $850 from the insurance company in 2014, do not report it as income. Freestatetaxfiling Single Casualty on Multiple Properties Personal property. Freestatetaxfiling   Personal property is any property that is not real property. Freestatetaxfiling If your personal property is stolen or is damaged or destroyed by a casualty, you must figure your loss separately for each item of property. Freestatetaxfiling Then combine these separate losses to figure the total loss from that casualty or theft. Freestatetaxfiling Example. Freestatetaxfiling A fire in your home destroyed an upholstered chair, an oriental rug, and an antique table. Freestatetaxfiling You did not have fire insurance to cover your loss. Freestatetaxfiling (This was the only casualty or theft you had during the year. Freestatetaxfiling ) You paid $750 for the chair and you established that it had an FMV of $500 just before the fire. Freestatetaxfiling The rug cost $3,000 and had an FMV of $2,500 just before the fire. Freestatetaxfiling You bought the table at an auction for $100 before discovering it was an antique. Freestatetaxfiling It had been appraised at $900 before the fire. Freestatetaxfiling You figure your loss on each of these items as follows:     Chair Rug Table 1) Basis (cost) $750 $3,000 $100 2) FMV before fire $500 $2,500 $900 3) FMV after fire –0– –0– –0– 4) Decrease in FMV $500 $2,500 $900 5) Loss (smaller of (1) or  (4)) $500 $2,500 $100           6) Total loss     $3,100 Real property. Freestatetaxfiling   In figuring a casualty loss on personal-use real property, treat the entire property (including any improvements, such as buildings, trees, and shrubs) as one item. Freestatetaxfiling Figure the loss using the smaller of the adjusted basis or the decrease in FMV of the entire property. Freestatetaxfiling Example. Freestatetaxfiling You bought your home a few years ago. Freestatetaxfiling You paid $160,000 ($20,000 for the land and $140,000 for the house). Freestatetaxfiling You also spent $2,000 for landscaping. Freestatetaxfiling This year a fire destroyed your home. Freestatetaxfiling The fire also damaged the shrubbery and trees in your yard. Freestatetaxfiling The fire was your only casualty or theft loss this year. Freestatetaxfiling Competent appraisers valued the property as a whole at $200,000 before the fire, but only $30,000 after the fire. Freestatetaxfiling (The loss to your household furnishings is not shown in this example. Freestatetaxfiling It would be figured separately on each item, as explained earlier under Personal property . Freestatetaxfiling ) Shortly after the fire, the insurance company paid you $155,000 for the loss. Freestatetaxfiling You figure your casualty loss as follows: 1) Adjusted basis of the entire property (land, building, and landscaping) $162,000 2) FMV of entire property before fire $200,000 3) FMV of entire property after fire 30,000 4) Decrease in FMV of entire  property $170,000 5) Loss (smaller of (1) or (4)) $162,000 6) Subtract insurance 155,000 7) Amount of loss after reimbursement $7,000 Deduction Limits After you have figured your casualty or theft loss, you must figure how much of the loss you can deduct. Freestatetaxfiling If the loss was to property for your personal use or your family's use, there are two limits on the amount you can deduct for your casualty or theft loss. Freestatetaxfiling You must reduce each casualty or theft loss by $100 ($100 rule). Freestatetaxfiling You must further reduce the total of all your casualty or theft losses by 10% of your adjusted gross income (10% rule). Freestatetaxfiling You make these reductions on Form 4684. Freestatetaxfiling These rules are explained next and Table 25-1 summarizes how to apply the $100 rule and the 10% rule in various situations. Freestatetaxfiling For more detailed explanations and examples, see Publication 547. Freestatetaxfiling Table 25-1. Freestatetaxfiling How To Apply the Deduction Limits for Personal-Use Property   $100 Rule 10% Rule General Application You must reduce each casualty or theft loss by $100 when figuring your deduction. Freestatetaxfiling Apply this rule after you have figured the amount of your loss. Freestatetaxfiling You must reduce your total casualty or theft loss by 10% of your adjusted gross income. Freestatetaxfiling Apply this rule after you reduce each loss by $100 (the $100 rule). Freestatetaxfiling Single Event Apply this rule only once, even if many pieces of property are affected. Freestatetaxfiling Apply this rule only once, even if many pieces of property are affected. Freestatetaxfiling More Than One Event Apply to the loss from each event. Freestatetaxfiling Apply to the total of all your losses from all events. Freestatetaxfiling More Than One Person— With Loss From the Same Event (other than a married couple filing jointly) Apply separately to each person. Freestatetaxfiling Apply separately to each person. Freestatetaxfiling Married Couple—With Loss From the Same Event Filing Jointly Apply as if you were one person. Freestatetaxfiling Apply as if you were one person. Freestatetaxfiling Filing Separately Apply separately to each spouse. Freestatetaxfiling Apply separately to each spouse. Freestatetaxfiling More Than One Owner (other than a married couple filing jointly) Apply separately to each owner of jointly owned property. Freestatetaxfiling Apply separately to each owner of jointly owned property. Freestatetaxfiling Property used partly for business and partly for personal purposes. Freestatetaxfiling   When property is used partly for personal purposes and partly for business or income-producing purposes, the casualty or theft loss deduction must be figured separately for the personal-use part and for the business or income-producing part. Freestatetaxfiling You must figure each loss separately because the $100 rule and the 10% rule apply only to the loss on the personal-use part of the property. Freestatetaxfiling $100 Rule After you have figured your casualty or theft loss on personal-use property, you must reduce that loss by $100. Freestatetaxfiling This reduction applies to each total casualty or theft loss. Freestatetaxfiling It does not matter how many pieces of property are involved in an event. Freestatetaxfiling Only a single $100 reduction applies. Freestatetaxfiling Example. Freestatetaxfiling A hailstorm damages your home and your car. Freestatetaxfiling Determine the amount of loss, as discussed earlier, for each of these items. Freestatetaxfiling Since the losses are due to a single event, you combine the losses and reduce the combined amount by $100. Freestatetaxfiling Single event. Freestatetaxfiling   Generally, events closely related in origin cause a single casualty. Freestatetaxfiling It is a single casualty when the damage is from two or more closely related causes, such as wind and flood damage caused by the same storm. Freestatetaxfiling 10% Rule You must reduce the total of all your casualty or theft losses on personal-use property by 10% of your adjusted gross income. Freestatetaxfiling Apply this rule after you reduce each loss by $100. Freestatetaxfiling For more information, see the Form 4684 instructions. Freestatetaxfiling If you have both gains and losses from casualties or thefts, see Gains and losses , later in this discussion. Freestatetaxfiling Example 1. Freestatetaxfiling In June, you discovered that your house had been burglarized. Freestatetaxfiling Your loss after insurance reimbursement was $2,000. Freestatetaxfiling Your adjusted gross income for the year you discovered the theft is $29,500. Freestatetaxfiling You first apply the $100 rule and then the 10% rule. Freestatetaxfiling Figure your theft loss deduction as follows. Freestatetaxfiling 1) Loss after insurance $2,000 2) Subtract $100 100 3) Loss after $100 rule $1,900 4) Subtract 10% × $29,500 AGI 2,950 5) Theft loss deduction –0– You do not have a theft loss deduction because your loss after you apply the $100 rule ($1,900) is less than 10% of your adjusted gross income ($2,950). Freestatetaxfiling Example 2. Freestatetaxfiling In March, you had a car accident that totally destroyed your car. Freestatetaxfiling You did not have collision insurance on your car, so you did not receive any insurance reimbursement. Freestatetaxfiling Your loss on the car was $1,800. Freestatetaxfiling In November, a fire damaged your basement and totally destroyed the furniture, washer, dryer, and other items stored there. Freestatetaxfiling Your loss on the basement items after reimbursement was $2,100. Freestatetaxfiling Your adjusted gross income for the year that the accident and fire occurred is $25,000. Freestatetaxfiling You figure your casualty loss deduction as follows. Freestatetaxfiling       Base-     Car ment 1) Loss $1,800 $2,100 2) Subtract $100 per incident 100 100 3) Loss after $100 rule $1,700 $2,000 4) Total loss $3,700 5) Subtract 10% × $25,000 AGI 2,500 6) Casualty loss deduction $1,200 Gains and losses. Freestatetaxfiling   If you had both gains and losses from casualties or thefts to personal-use property, you must compare your total gains to your total losses. Freestatetaxfiling Do this after you have reduced each loss by any reimbursements and by $100, but before you have reduced the losses by 10% of your adjusted gross income. Freestatetaxfiling Casualty or theft gains do not include gains you choose to postpone. Freestatetaxfiling See Publication 547 for information on the postponement of gain. Freestatetaxfiling Losses more than gains. Freestatetaxfiling   If your losses are more than your recognized gains, subtract your gains from your losses and reduce the result by 10% of your adjusted gross income. Freestatetaxfiling The rest, if any, is your deductible loss from personal-use property. Freestatetaxfiling Gains more than losses. Freestatetaxfiling   If your recognized gains are more than your losses, subtract your losses from your gains. Freestatetaxfiling The difference is treated as capital gain and must be reported on Schedule D (Form 1040). Freestatetaxfiling The 10% rule does not apply to your gains. Freestatetaxfiling When To Report Gains and Losses Gains. Freestatetaxfiling   If you receive an insurance or other reimbursement that is more than your adjusted basis in the destroyed or stolen property, you have a gain from the casualty or theft. Freestatetaxfiling You must include this gain in your income in the year you receive the reimbursement, unless you choose to postpone reporting the gain as explained in Publication 547. Freestatetaxfiling If you have a loss, see Table 25-2 . Freestatetaxfiling Table 25-2. Freestatetaxfiling When To Deduct a Loss IF you have a loss. Freestatetaxfiling . Freestatetaxfiling . Freestatetaxfiling THEN deduct it in the year. Freestatetaxfiling . Freestatetaxfiling . Freestatetaxfiling from a casualty, the loss occurred. Freestatetaxfiling in a federally declared disaster area, the disaster occurred or the year immediately before the disaster. Freestatetaxfiling from a theft, the theft was discovered. Freestatetaxfiling on a deposit treated as a:   • casualty or any ordinary loss, a reasonable estimate can be made. Freestatetaxfiling • bad debt, deposits are totally worthless. Freestatetaxfiling Losses. Freestatetaxfiling   Generally, you can deduct a casualty loss that is not reimbursable only in the tax year in which the casualty occurred. Freestatetaxfiling This is true even if you do not repair or replace the damaged property until a later year. Freestatetaxfiling   You can deduct theft losses that are not reimbursable only in the year you discover your property was stolen. Freestatetaxfiling   If you are not sure whether part of your casualty or theft loss will be reimbursed, do not deduct that part until the tax year when you become reasonably certain that it will not be reimbursed. Freestatetaxfiling Loss on deposits. Freestatetaxfiling   If your loss is a loss on deposits in an insolvent or bankrupt financial institution, see Loss on Deposits , earlier. Freestatetaxfiling Disaster Area Loss You generally must deduct a casualty loss in the year it occurred. Freestatetaxfiling However, if you have a casualty loss from a federally declared disaster that occurred in an area warranting public or individual assistance (or both), you can choose to deduct the loss on your tax return or amended return for either of the following years. Freestatetaxfiling The year the disaster occurred. Freestatetaxfiling The year immediately preceding the year the disaster occurred. Freestatetaxfiling Gains. Freestatetaxfiling    Special rules apply if you choose to postpone reporting gain on property damaged or destroyed in a federally declared disaster area. Freestatetaxfiling For those special rules, see Publication 547. Freestatetaxfiling Postponed tax deadlines. Freestatetaxfiling   The IRS may postpone for up to 1 year certain tax deadlines of taxpayers who are affected by a federally declared disaster. Freestatetaxfiling The tax deadlines the IRS may postpone include those for filing income and employment tax returns, paying income and employment taxes, and making contributions to a traditional IRA or Roth IRA. Freestatetaxfiling   If any tax deadline is postponed, the IRS will publicize the postponement in your area by publishing a news release, revenue ruling, revenue procedure, notice, announcement, or other guidance in the Internal Revenue Bulletin (IRB). Freestatetaxfiling Go to www. Freestatetaxfiling irs. Freestatetaxfiling gov/uac/Tax-Relief-in-Disaster-Situations to find out if a tax deadline has been postponed for your area. Freestatetaxfiling Who is eligible. Freestatetaxfiling   If the IRS postpones a tax deadline, the following taxpayers are eligible for the postponement. Freestatetaxfiling Any individual whose main home is located in a covered disaster area (defined next). Freestatetaxfiling Any business entity or sole proprietor whose principal place of business is located in a covered disaster area. Freestatetaxfiling Any individual who is a relief worker affiliated with a recognized government or philanthropic organization who is assisting in a covered disaster area. Freestatetaxfiling Any individual, business entity, or sole proprietorship whose records are needed to meet a postponed tax deadline, provided those records are maintained in a covered disaster area. Freestatetaxfiling The main home or principal place of business does not have to be located in the covered disaster area. Freestatetaxfiling Any estate or trust that has tax records necessary to meet a postponed tax deadline, provided those records are maintained in a covered disaster area. Freestatetaxfiling The spouse on a joint return with a taxpayer who is eligible for postponements. Freestatetaxfiling Any individual, business entity, or sole proprietorship not located in a covered disaster area, but whose records necessary to meet a postponed tax deadline are located in the covered disaster area. Freestatetaxfiling Any individual visiting the covered disaster area who was killed or injured as a result of the disaster. Freestatetaxfiling Any other person determined by the IRS to be affected by a federally declared disaster. Freestatetaxfiling Covered disaster area. Freestatetaxfiling   This is an area of a federally declared disaster in which the IRS has decided to postpone tax deadlines for up to 1 year. Freestatetaxfiling Abatement of interest and penalties. Freestatetaxfiling   The IRS may abate the interest and penalties on underpaid income tax for the length of any postponement of tax deadlines. Freestatetaxfiling More information. Freestatetaxfiling   For more information, see Disaster Area Losses in Publication 547. Freestatetaxfiling How To Report Gains and Losses Use Form 4684 to report a gain or a deductible loss from a casualty or theft. Freestatetaxfiling If you have more than one casualty or theft, use a separate Form 4684 to determine your gain or loss for each event. Freestatetaxfiling Combine the gains and losses on one Form 4684. Freestatetaxfiling Follow the form instructions as to which lines to fill out. Freestatetaxfiling In addition, you must use the appropriate schedule to report a gain or loss. Freestatetaxfiling The schedule you use depends on whether you have a gain or loss. Freestatetaxfiling If you have a: Report it on: Gain Schedule D (Form 1040) Loss Schedule A (Form 1040) Adjustments to basis. Freestatetaxfiling   If you have a casualty or theft loss, you must decrease your basis in the property by any insurance or other reimbursement you receive, and by any deductible loss. Freestatetaxfiling Amounts you spend to restore your property after a casualty increase your adjusted basis. Freestatetaxfiling See Adjusted Basis in chapter 13 for more information. Freestatetaxfiling Net operating loss (NOL). Freestatetaxfiling    If your casualty or theft loss deduction causes your deductions for the year to be more than your income for the year, you may have an NOL. Freestatetaxfiling You can use an NOL to lower your tax in an earlier year, allowing you to get a refund for tax you have already paid. Freestatetaxfiling Or, you can use it to lower your tax in a later year. Freestatetaxfiling You do not have to be in business to have an NOL from a casualty or theft loss. Freestatetaxfiling For more information, see Publication 536, Net Operating Losses (NOLs) for Individuals, Estates, and Trusts. Freestatetaxfiling Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications