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File 1040 X

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File 1040 X

File 1040 x 2. File 1040 x   Electing the Section 179 Deduction Table of Contents Introduction Useful Items - You may want to see: What Property Qualifies?Eligible Property Property Acquired for Business Use Property Acquired by Purchase What Property Does Not Qualify?Land and Improvements Excepted Property How Much Can You Deduct?Dollar Limits Business Income Limit Partnerships and Partners S Corporations Other Corporations How Do You Elect the Deduction? When Must You Recapture the Deduction? Introduction You can elect to recover all or part of the cost of certain qualifying property, up to a limit, by deducting it in the year you place the property in service. File 1040 x This is the section 179 deduction. File 1040 x You can elect the section 179 deduction instead of recovering the cost by taking depreciation deductions. File 1040 x Estates and trusts cannot elect the section 179 deduction. File 1040 x This chapter explains what property does and does not qualify for the section 179 deduction, what limits apply to the deduction (including special rules for partnerships and corporations), and how to elect it. File 1040 x It also explains when and how to recapture the deduction. File 1040 x Useful Items - You may want to see: Publication 537 Installment Sales 544 Sales and Other Dispositions of Assets 954 Tax Incentives for Distressed Communities Form (and Instructions) 4562 Depreciation and Amortization 4797 Sales of Business Property See chapter 6 for information about getting publications and forms. File 1040 x What Property Qualifies? To qualify for the section 179 deduction, your property must meet all the following requirements. File 1040 x It must be eligible property. File 1040 x It must be acquired for business use. File 1040 x It must have been acquired by purchase. File 1040 x It must not be property described later under What Property Does Not Qualify . File 1040 x The following discussions provide information about these requirements and exceptions. File 1040 x Eligible Property To qualify for the section 179 deduction, your property must be one of the following types of depreciable property. File 1040 x Tangible personal property. File 1040 x Other tangible property (except buildings and their structural components) used as: An integral part of manufacturing, production, or extraction or of furnishing transportation, communications, electricity, gas, water, or sewage disposal services, A research facility used in connection with any of the activities in (a) above, or A facility used in connection with any of the activities in (a) for the bulk storage of fungible commodities. File 1040 x Single purpose agricultural (livestock) or horticultural structures. File 1040 x See chapter 7 of Publication 225 for definitions and information regarding the use requirements that apply to these structures. File 1040 x Storage facilities (except buildings and their structural components) used in connection with distributing petroleum or any primary product of petroleum. File 1040 x Off-the-shelf computer software. File 1040 x Qualified real property (described below). File 1040 x Tangible personal property. File 1040 x   Tangible personal property is any tangible property that is not real property. File 1040 x It includes the following property. File 1040 x Machinery and equipment. File 1040 x Property contained in or attached to a building (other than structural components), such as refrigerators, grocery store counters, office equipment, printing presses, testing equipment, and signs. File 1040 x Gasoline storage tanks and pumps at retail service stations. File 1040 x Livestock, including horses, cattle, hogs, sheep, goats, and mink and other furbearing animals. File 1040 x   The treatment of property as tangible personal property for the section 179 deduction is not controlled by its treatment under local law. File 1040 x For example, property may not be tangible personal property for the deduction even if treated so under local law, and some property (such as fixtures) may be tangible personal property for the deduction even if treated as real property under local law. File 1040 x Off-the-shelf computer software. File 1040 x   Off-the-shelf computer software placed in service during the tax year is qualifying property for purposes of the section 179 deduction. File 1040 x This is computer software that is readily available for purchase by the general public, is subject to a nonexclusive license, and has not been substantially modified. File 1040 x It includes any program designed to cause a computer to perform a desired function. File 1040 x However, a database or similar item is not considered computer software unless it is in the public domain and is incidental to the operation of otherwise qualifying software. File 1040 x Qualified real property. File 1040 x   You can elect to treat certain qualified real property you placed in service as section 179 property for tax years beginning in 2013. File 1040 x If this election is made, the term “section 179 property” will include any qualified real property that is: Qualified leasehold improvement property, Qualified restaurant property, or Qualified retail improvement property. File 1040 x The maximum section 179 expense deduction that can be elected for qualified section 179 real property is $250,000 of the maximum section 179 deduction of $500,000 in 2013. File 1040 x For more information, see Special rules for qualified section 179 real property, later. File 1040 x Also, see Election for certain qualified section 179 real property, later, for information on how to make this election. File 1040 x Qualified leasehold improvement property. File 1040 x   Generally, this is any improvement to an interior part of a building (placed in service before January 1, 2014) that is nonresidential real property, provided all of the requirements discussed in chapter 3 under Qualified leasehold improvement property are met. File 1040 x   In addition, an improvement made by the lessor does not qualify as qualified leasehold improvement property to any subsequent owner unless it is acquired from the original lessor by reason of the lessor’s death or in any of the following types of transactions. File 1040 x A transaction to which section 381(a) applies, A mere change in the form of conducting the trade or business so long as the property is retained in the trade or business as qualified leasehold improvement property and the taxpayer retains a substantial interest in the trade or business, A like-kind exchange, involuntary conversion, or re-acquisition of real property to the extent that the basis in the property represents the carryover basis, or Certain nonrecognition transactions to the extent that your basis in the property is determined by reference to the transferor’s or distributor’s basis in the property. File 1040 x Examples include the following. File 1040 x A complete liquidation of a subsidiary. File 1040 x A transfer to a corporation controlled by the transferor. File 1040 x An exchange of property by a corporation solely for stock or securities in another corporation in a reorganization. File 1040 x Qualified restaurant property. File 1040 x   Qualified restaurant property is any section 1250 property that is a building or an improvement to a building placed in service after December 31, 2008, and before January 1, 2014. File 1040 x Also, more than 50% of the building’s square footage must be devoted to preparation of meals and seating for on-premise consumption of prepared meals. File 1040 x Qualified retail improvement property. File 1040 x   Generally, this is any improvement (placed in service after December 31, 2008, and before January 1, 2014) to an interior portion of nonresidential real property if it meets the following requirements. File 1040 x The portion is open to the general public and is used in the retail trade or business of selling tangible property to the general public. File 1040 x The improvement is placed in service more than 3 years after the date the building was first placed in service. File 1040 x The expenses are not for the enlargement of the building, any elevator or escalator, any structural components benefiting a common area, or the internal structural framework of the building. File 1040 x In addition, an improvement made by the lessor does not qualify as qualified retail improvement property to any subsequent owner unless it is acquired from the original lessor by reason of the lessor’s death or in any of the following types of transactions. File 1040 x A transaction to which section 381(a) applies, A mere change in the form of conducting the trade or business so long as the property is retained in the trade or business as qualified leasehold improvement property and the taxpayer retains a substantial interest in the trade or business, A like-kind exchange, involuntary conversion, or re-acquisition of real property to the extent that the basis in the property represents the carryover basis, or Certain nonrecognition transactions to the extent that your basis in the property is determined by reference to the transferor’s or distributor’s basis in the property. File 1040 x Examples include the following. File 1040 x A complete liquidation of a subsidiary. File 1040 x A transfer to a corporation controlled by the transferor. File 1040 x An exchange of property by a corporation solely for stock or securities in another corporation in a reorganization. File 1040 x Property Acquired for Business Use To qualify for the section 179 deduction, your property must have been acquired for use in your trade or business. File 1040 x Property you acquire only for the production of income, such as investment property, rental property (if renting property is not your trade or business), and property that produces royalties, does not qualify. File 1040 x Partial business use. File 1040 x   When you use property for both business and nonbusiness purposes, you can elect the section 179 deduction only if you use the property more than 50% for business in the year you place it in service. File 1040 x If you use the property more than 50% for business, multiply the cost of the property by the percentage of business use. File 1040 x Use the resulting business cost to figure your section 179 deduction. File 1040 x Example. File 1040 x May Oak bought and placed in service an item of section 179 property costing $11,000. File 1040 x She used the property 80% for her business and 20% for personal purposes. File 1040 x The business part of the cost of the property is $8,800 (80% × $11,000). File 1040 x Property Acquired by Purchase To qualify for the section 179 deduction, your property must have been acquired by purchase. File 1040 x For example, property acquired by gift or inheritance does not qualify. File 1040 x Property is not considered acquired by purchase in the following situations. File 1040 x It is acquired by one component member of a controlled group from another component member of the same group. File 1040 x Its basis is determined either— In whole or in part by its adjusted basis in the hands of the person from whom it was acquired, or Under the stepped-up basis rules for property acquired from a decedent. File 1040 x It is acquired from a related person. File 1040 x Related persons. File 1040 x   Related persons are described under Related persons earlier. File 1040 x However, to determine whether property qualifies for the section 179 deduction, treat as an individual's family only his or her spouse, ancestors, and lineal descendants and substitute "50%" for "10%" each place it appears. File 1040 x Example. File 1040 x Ken Larch is a tailor. File 1040 x He bought two industrial sewing machines from his father. File 1040 x He placed both machines in service in the same year he bought them. File 1040 x They do not qualify as section 179 property because Ken and his father are related persons. File 1040 x He cannot claim a section 179 deduction for the cost of these machines. File 1040 x What Property Does Not Qualify? Certain property does not qualify for the section 179 deduction. File 1040 x This includes the following. File 1040 x Land and Improvements Land and land improvements do not qualify as section 179 property. File 1040 x Land improvements include swimming pools, paved parking areas, wharves, docks, bridges, and fences. File 1040 x Excepted Property Even if the requirements explained earlier under What Property Qualifies are met, you cannot elect the section 179 deduction for the following property. File 1040 x Certain property you lease to others (if you are a noncorporate lessor). File 1040 x Certain property used predominantly to furnish lodging or in connection with the furnishing of lodging. File 1040 x Air conditioning or heating units. File 1040 x Property used predominantly outside the United States, except property described in section 168(g)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code. File 1040 x Property used by certain tax-exempt organizations, except property used in connection with the production of income subject to the tax on unrelated trade or business income. File 1040 x Property used by governmental units or foreign persons or entities, except property used under a lease with a term of less than 6 months. File 1040 x Leased property. File 1040 x   Generally, you cannot claim a section 179 deduction based on the cost of property you lease to someone else. File 1040 x This rule does not apply to corporations. File 1040 x However, you can claim a section 179 deduction for the cost of the following property. File 1040 x Property you manufacture or produce and lease to others. File 1040 x Property you purchase and lease to others if both the following tests are met. File 1040 x The term of the lease (including options to renew) is less than 50% of the property's class life. File 1040 x For the first 12 months after the property is transferred to the lessee, the total business deductions you are allowed on the property (other than rents and reimbursed amounts) are more than 15% of the rental income from the property. File 1040 x Property used for lodging. File 1040 x   Generally, you cannot claim a section 179 deduction for property used predominantly to furnish lodging or in connection with the furnishing of lodging. File 1040 x However, this does not apply to the following types of property. File 1040 x Nonlodging commercial facilities that are available to those not using the lodging facilities on the same basis as they are available to those using the lodging facilities. File 1040 x Property used by a hotel or motel in connection with the trade or business of furnishing lodging where the predominant portion of the accommodations is used by transients. File 1040 x Any certified historic structure to the extent its basis is due to qualified rehabilitation expenditures. File 1040 x Any energy property. File 1040 x Energy property. File 1040 x   Energy property is property that meets the following requirements. File 1040 x It is one of the following types of property. File 1040 x Equipment that uses solar energy to generate electricity, to heat or cool a structure, to provide hot water for use in a structure, or to provide solar process heat, except for equipment used to generate energy to heat a swimming pool. File 1040 x Equipment placed in service after December 31, 2005, and before January 1, 2017, that uses solar energy to illuminate the inside of a structure using fiber-optic distributed sunlight. File 1040 x Equipment used to produce, distribute, or use energy derived from a geothermal deposit. File 1040 x For electricity generated by geothermal power, this includes equipment up to (but not including) the electrical transmission stage. File 1040 x Qualified fuel cell property or qualified microturbine property placed in service after December 31, 2005, and before January 1, 2017. File 1040 x The construction, reconstruction, or erection of the property must be completed by you. File 1040 x For property you acquire, the original use of the property must begin with you. File 1040 x The property must meet the performance and quality standards, if any, prescribed by Income Tax Regulations in effect at the time you get the property. File 1040 x   For periods before February 14, 2008, energy property does not include any property that is public utility property as defined by section 46(f)(5) of the Internal Revenue Code (as in effect on November 4, 1990). File 1040 x How Much Can You Deduct? Your section 179 deduction is generally the cost of the qualifying property. File 1040 x However, the total amount you can elect to deduct under section 179 is subject to a dollar limit and a business income limit. File 1040 x These limits apply to each taxpayer, not to each business. File 1040 x However, see Married Individuals under Dollar Limits , later. File 1040 x For a passenger automobile, the total section 179 deduction and depreciation deduction are limited. File 1040 x See Do the Passenger Automobile Limits Apply in chapter 5 . File 1040 x If you deduct only part of the cost of qualifying property as a section 179 deduction, you can generally depreciate the cost you do not deduct. File 1040 x Trade-in of other property. File 1040 x   If you buy qualifying property with cash and a trade-in, its cost for purposes of the section 179 deduction includes only the cash you paid. File 1040 x Example. File 1040 x Silver Leaf, a retail bakery, traded two ovens having a total adjusted basis of $680 for a new oven costing $1,320. File 1040 x They received an $800 trade-in allowance for the old ovens and paid $520 in cash for the new oven. File 1040 x The bakery also traded a used van with an adjusted basis of $4,500 for a new van costing $9,000. File 1040 x They received a $4,800 trade-in allowance on the used van and paid $4,200 in cash for the new van. File 1040 x Only the portion of the new property's basis paid by cash qualifies for the section 179 deduction. File 1040 x Therefore, Silver Leaf's qualifying costs for the section 179 deduction are $4,720 ($520 + $4,200). File 1040 x Dollar Limits The total amount you can elect to deduct under section 179 for most property placed in service in 2013 generally cannot be more than $500,000. File 1040 x If you acquire and place in service more than one item of qualifying property during the year, you can allocate the section 179 deduction among the items in any way, as long as the total deduction is not more than $500,000. File 1040 x You do not have to claim the full $500,000. File 1040 x Qualified real property (described earlier) that you elected to treat as section 179 real property is limited to $250,000 of the maximum deduction of $500,000 for 2013. File 1040 x The amount you can elect to deduct is not affected if you place qualifying property in service in a short tax year or if you place qualifying property in service for only a part of a 12-month tax year. File 1040 x After you apply the dollar limit to determine a tentative deduction, you must apply the business income limit (described later) to determine your actual section 179 deduction. File 1040 x Example. File 1040 x In 2013, you bought and placed in service $500,000 in machinery and a $25,000 circular saw for your business. File 1040 x You elect to deduct $475,000 for the machinery and the entire $25,000 for the saw, a total of $500,000. File 1040 x This is the maximum amount you can deduct. File 1040 x Your $25,000 deduction for the saw completely recovered its cost. File 1040 x Your basis for depreciation is zero. File 1040 x The basis for depreciation of your machinery is $25,000. File 1040 x You figure this by subtracting your $475,000 section 179 deduction for the machinery from the $500,000 cost of the machinery. File 1040 x Situations affecting dollar limit. File 1040 x   Under certain circumstances, the general dollar limits on the section 179 deduction may be reduced or increased or there may be additional dollar limits. File 1040 x The general dollar limit is affected by any of the following situations. File 1040 x The cost of your section 179 property placed in service exceeds $2,000,000. File 1040 x Your business is an enterprise zone business. File 1040 x You placed in service a sport utility or certain other vehicles. File 1040 x You are married filing a joint or separate return. File 1040 x Costs exceeding $2,000,000 If the cost of your qualifying section 179 property placed in service in a year is more than $2,000,000, you generally must reduce the dollar limit (but not below zero) by the amount of cost over $2,000,000. File 1040 x If the cost of your section 179 property placed in service during 2013 is $2,500,000 or more, you cannot take a section 179 deduction. File 1040 x Example. File 1040 x In 2013, Jane Ash placed in service machinery costing $2,100,000. File 1040 x This cost is $100,000 more than $2,000,000, so she must reduce her dollar limit to $400,000 ($500,000 − $100,000). File 1040 x Enterprise Zone Businesses An increased section 179 deduction is available to enterprise zone businesses for qualified zone property placed in service during the tax year, in an empowerment zone. File 1040 x For more information including the definitions of “enterprise zone business” and “qualified zone property,” see sections 1397A, 1397C, and 1397D of the Internal Revenue Code. File 1040 x The dollar limit on the section 179 deduction is increased by the smaller of: $35,000, or The cost of section 179 property that is also qualified zone property placed in service before January 1, 2014 (including such property placed in service by your spouse, even if you are filing a separate return). File 1040 x Note. File 1040 x   You take into account only 50% (instead of 100%) of the cost of qualified zone property placed in service in a year when figuring the reduced dollar limit for costs exceeding $2,000,000 (explained earlier). File 1040 x Sport Utility and Certain Other Vehicles You cannot elect to expense more than $25,000 of the cost of any heavy sport utility vehicle (SUV) and certain other vehicles placed in service during the tax year. File 1040 x This rule applies to any 4-wheeled vehicle primarily designed or used to carry passengers over public streets, roads, or highways, that is rated at more than 6,000 pounds gross vehicle weight and not more than 14,000 pounds gross vehicle weight. File 1040 x However, the $25,000 limit does not apply to any vehicle: Designed to seat more than nine passengers behind the driver's seat, Equipped with a cargo area (either open or enclosed by a cap) of at least six feet in interior length that is not readily accessible from the passenger compartment, or That has an integral enclosure fully enclosing the driver compartment and load carrying device, does not have seating rearward of the driver's seat, and has no body section protruding more than 30 inches ahead of the leading edge of the windshield. File 1040 x Married Individuals If you are married, how you figure your section 179 deduction depends on whether you file jointly or separately. File 1040 x If you file a joint return, you and your spouse are treated as one taxpayer in determining any reduction to the dollar limit, regardless of which of you purchased the property or placed it in service. File 1040 x If you and your spouse file separate returns, you are treated as one taxpayer for the dollar limit, including the reduction for costs over $2,000,000. File 1040 x You must allocate the dollar limit (after any reduction) between you equally, unless you both elect a different allocation. File 1040 x If the percentages elected by each of you do not total 100%, 50% will be allocated to each of you. File 1040 x Example. File 1040 x Jack Elm is married. File 1040 x He and his wife file separate returns. File 1040 x Jack bought and placed in service $2,000,000 of qualified farm machinery in 2013. File 1040 x His wife has her own business, and she bought and placed in service $30,000 of qualified business equipment. File 1040 x Their combined dollar limit is $470,000. File 1040 x This is because they must figure the limit as if they were one taxpayer. File 1040 x They reduce the $500,000 dollar limit by the $30,000 excess of their costs over $2,000,000. File 1040 x They elect to allocate the $470,000 dollar limit as follows. File 1040 x $446,500 ($470,000 x 95%) to Mr. File 1040 x Elm's machinery. File 1040 x $23,500 ($470,000 x 5%) to Mrs. File 1040 x Elm's equipment. File 1040 x If they did not make an election to allocate their costs in this way, they would have to allocate $235,000 ($470,000 × 50%) to each of them. File 1040 x Joint return after filing separate returns. File 1040 x   If you and your spouse elect to amend your separate returns by filing a joint return after the due date for filing your return, the dollar limit on the joint return is the lesser of the following amounts. File 1040 x The dollar limit (after reduction for any cost of section 179 property over $2,000,000). File 1040 x The total cost of section 179 property you and your spouse elected to expense on your separate returns. File 1040 x Example. File 1040 x The facts are the same as in the previous example except that Jack elected to deduct $30,000 of the cost of section 179 property on his separate return and his wife elected to deduct $2,000. File 1040 x After the due date of their returns, they file a joint return. File 1040 x Their dollar limit for the section 179 deduction is $32,000. File 1040 x This is the lesser of the following amounts. File 1040 x $470,000—The dollar limit less the cost of section 179 property over $2,000,000. File 1040 x $32,000—The total they elected to expense on their separate returns. File 1040 x Business Income Limit The total cost you can deduct each year after you apply the dollar limit is limited to the taxable income from the active conduct of any trade or business during the year. File 1040 x Generally, you are considered to actively conduct a trade or business if you meaningfully participate in the management or operations of the trade or business. File 1040 x Any cost not deductible in one year under section 179 because of this limit can be carried to the next year. File 1040 x Special rules apply to a 2013 deduction of qualified section 179 real property that is disallowed because of the business income limit. File 1040 x See Special rules for qualified section 179 property under Carryover of disallowed deduction, later. File 1040 x Taxable income. File 1040 x   In general, figure taxable income for this purpose by totaling the net income and losses from all trades and businesses you actively conducted during the year. File 1040 x Net income or loss from a trade or business includes the following items. File 1040 x Section 1231 gains (or losses). File 1040 x Interest from working capital of your trade or business. File 1040 x Wages, salaries, tips, or other pay earned as an employee. File 1040 x For information about section 1231 gains and losses, see chapter 3 in Publication 544. File 1040 x   In addition, figure taxable income without regard to any of the following. File 1040 x The section 179 deduction. File 1040 x The self-employment tax deduction. File 1040 x Any net operating loss carryback or carryforward. File 1040 x Any unreimbursed employee business expenses. File 1040 x Two different taxable income limits. File 1040 x   In addition to the business income limit for your section 179 deduction, you may have a taxable income limit for some other deduction. File 1040 x You may have to figure the limit for this other deduction taking into account the section 179 deduction. File 1040 x If so, complete the following steps. File 1040 x Step Action 1 Figure taxable income without the section 179 deduction or the other deduction. File 1040 x 2 Figure a hypothetical section 179 deduction using the taxable income figured in Step 1. File 1040 x 3 Subtract the hypothetical section 179 deduction figured in Step 2 from the taxable income figured in Step 1. File 1040 x 4 Figure a hypothetical amount for the other deduction using the amount figured in Step 3 as taxable income. File 1040 x 5 Subtract the hypothetical other deduction figured in Step 4 from the taxable income figured in Step 1. File 1040 x 6 Figure your actual section 179 deduction using the taxable income figured in Step 5. File 1040 x 7 Subtract your actual section 179 deduction figured in Step 6 from the taxable income figured in Step 1. File 1040 x 8 Figure your actual other deduction using the taxable income figured in Step 7. File 1040 x Example. File 1040 x On February 1, 2013, the XYZ corporation purchased and placed in service qualifying section 179 property that cost $500,000. File 1040 x It elects to expense the entire $500,000 cost under section 179. File 1040 x In June, the corporation gave a charitable contribution of $10,000. File 1040 x A corporation's limit on charitable contributions is figured after subtracting any section 179 deduction. File 1040 x The business income limit for the section 179 deduction is figured after subtracting any allowable charitable contributions. File 1040 x XYZ's taxable income figured without the section 179 deduction or the deduction for charitable contributions is $520,000. File 1040 x XYZ figures its section 179 deduction and its deduction for charitable contributions as follows. File 1040 x Step 1– Taxable income figured without either deduction is $520,000. File 1040 x Step 2– Using $520,000 as taxable income, XYZ's hypothetical section 179 deduction is $500,000. File 1040 x Step 3– $20,000 ($520,000 − $500,000). File 1040 x Step 4– Using $20,000 (from Step 3) as taxable income, XYZ's hypothetical charitable contribution (limited to 10% of taxable income) is $2,000. File 1040 x Step 5– $518,000 ($520,000 − $2,000). File 1040 x Step 6– Using $518,000 (from Step 5) as taxable income, XYZ figures the actual section 179 deduction. File 1040 x Because the taxable income is at least $500,000, XYZ can take a $500,000 section 179 deduction. File 1040 x Step 7– $20,000 ($520,000 − $500,000). File 1040 x Step 8– Using $20,000 (from Step 7) as taxable income, XYZ's actual charitable contribution (limited to 10% of taxable income) is $2,000. File 1040 x Carryover of disallowed deduction. File 1040 x   You can carry over for an unlimited number of years the cost of any section 179 property you elected to expense but were unable to because of the business income limit. File 1040 x This disallowed deduction amount is shown on line 13 of Form 4562. File 1040 x You use the amount you carry over to determine your section 179 deduction in the next year. File 1040 x Enter that amount on line 10 of your Form 4562 for the next year. File 1040 x   If you place more than one property in service in a year, you can select the properties for which all or a part of the costs will be carried forward. File 1040 x Your selections must be shown in your books and records. File 1040 x For this purpose, treat section 179 costs allocated from a partnership or an S corporation as one item of section 179 property. File 1040 x If you do not make a selection, the total carryover will be allocated equally among the properties you elected to expense for the year. File 1040 x   If costs from more than one year are carried forward to a subsequent year in which only part of the total carryover can be deducted, you must deduct the costs being carried forward from the earliest year first. File 1040 x Special rules for qualified section 179 real property. File 1040 x   You can carry over to 2013 a 2012 deduction attributable to qualified section 179 real property that you elected to expense but were unable to take because of the business income limitation. File 1040 x Any such 2012 carryover amounts that are not deducted in 2013, plus any 2013 disallowed section 179 expense deductions attributable to qualified real property, are not carried over to 2014. File 1040 x Instead these amounts are treated as property placed in service on the first day of 2013 for purposes of computing depreciation (including the special depreciation allowance, if applicable). File 1040 x See section 179(f) of the Internal Revenue Code and Notice 2013-59 for more information. File 1040 x If there is a sale or other disposition of your property (including a transfer at death) before you can use the full amount of any outstanding carryover of your disallowed section 179 deduction, neither you nor the new owner can deduct any of the unused amount. File 1040 x Instead, you must add it back to the property's basis. File 1040 x Partnerships and Partners The section 179 deduction limits apply both to the partnership and to each partner. File 1040 x The partnership determines its section 179 deduction subject to the limits. File 1040 x It then allocates the deduction among its partners. File 1040 x Each partner adds the amount allocated from partnerships (shown on Schedule K-1 (Form 1065), Partner's Share of Income, Deductions, Credits, etc. File 1040 x ) to his or her nonpartnership section 179 costs and then applies the dollar limit to this total. File 1040 x To determine any reduction in the dollar limit for costs over $2,000,000, the partner does not include any of the cost of section 179 property placed in service by the partnership. File 1040 x After the dollar limit (reduced for any nonpartnership section 179 costs over $2,000,000) is applied, any remaining cost of the partnership and nonpartnership section 179 property is subject to the business income limit. File 1040 x Partnership's taxable income. File 1040 x   For purposes of the business income limit, figure the partnership's taxable income by adding together the net income and losses from all trades or businesses actively conducted by the partnership during the year. File 1040 x See the Instructions for Form 1065 for information on how to figure partnership net income (or loss). File 1040 x However, figure taxable income without regard to credits, tax-exempt income, the section 179 deduction, and guaranteed payments under section 707(c) of the Internal Revenue Code. File 1040 x Partner's share of partnership's taxable income. File 1040 x   For purposes of the business income limit, the taxable income of a partner engaged in the active conduct of one or more of a partnership's trades or businesses includes his or her allocable share of taxable income derived from the partnership's active conduct of any trade or business. File 1040 x Example. File 1040 x In 2013, Beech Partnership placed in service section 179 property with a total cost of $2,025,000. File 1040 x The partnership must reduce its dollar limit by $25,000 ($2,025,000 − $2,000,000). File 1040 x Its maximum section 179 deduction is $475,000 ($500,000 − $25,000), and it elects to expense that amount. File 1040 x The partnership's taxable income from the active conduct of all its trades or businesses for the year was $600,000, so it can deduct the full $475,000. File 1040 x It allocates $40,000 of its section 179 deduction and $50,000 of its taxable income to Dean, one of its partners. File 1040 x In addition to being a partner in Beech Partnership, Dean is also a partner in the Cedar Partnership, which allocated to him a $30,000 section 179 deduction and $35,000 of its taxable income from the active conduct of its business. File 1040 x He also conducts a business as a sole proprietor and, in 2013, placed in service in that business qualifying section 179 property costing $55,000. File 1040 x He had a net loss of $5,000 from that business for the year. File 1040 x Dean does not have to include section 179 partnership costs to figure any reduction in his dollar limit, so his total section 179 costs for the year are not more than $2,000,000 and his dollar limit is not reduced. File 1040 x His maximum section 179 deduction is $500,000. File 1040 x He elects to expense all of the $70,000 in section 179 deductions allocated from the partnerships ($40,000 from Beech Partnership plus $30,000 from Cedar Partnership), plus $55,000 of his sole proprietorship's section 179 costs, and notes that information in his books and records. File 1040 x However, his deduction is limited to his business taxable income of $80,000 ($50,000 from Beech Partnership, plus $35,000 from Cedar Partnership minus $5,000 loss from his sole proprietorship). File 1040 x He carries over $45,000 ($125,000 − $80,000) of the elected section 179 costs to 2014. File 1040 x He allocates the carryover amount to the cost of section 179 property placed in service in his sole proprietorship, and notes that allocation in his books and records. File 1040 x Different tax years. File 1040 x   For purposes of the business income limit, if the partner's tax year and that of the partnership differ, the partner's share of the partnership's taxable income for a tax year is generally the partner's distributive share for the partnership tax year that ends with or within the partner's tax year. File 1040 x Example. File 1040 x John and James Oak are equal partners in Oak Partnership. File 1040 x Oak Partnership uses a tax year ending January 31. File 1040 x John and James both use a tax year ending December 31. File 1040 x For its tax year ending January 31, 2013, Oak Partnership's taxable income from the active conduct of its business is $80,000, of which $70,000 was earned during 2012. File 1040 x John and James each include $40,000 (each partner's entire share) of partnership taxable income in computing their business income limit for the 2013 tax year. File 1040 x Adjustment of partner's basis in partnership. File 1040 x   A partner must reduce the basis of his or her partnership interest by the total amount of section 179 expenses allocated from the partnership even if the partner cannot currently deduct the total amount. File 1040 x If the partner disposes of his or her partnership interest, the partner's basis for determining gain or loss is increased by any outstanding carryover of disallowed section 179 expenses allocated from the partnership. File 1040 x Adjustment of partnership's basis in section 179 property. File 1040 x   The basis of a partnership's section 179 property must be reduced by the section 179 deduction elected by the partnership. File 1040 x This reduction of basis must be made even if a partner cannot deduct all or part of the section 179 deduction allocated to that partner by the partnership because of the limits. File 1040 x S Corporations Generally, the rules that apply to a partnership and its partners also apply to an S corporation and its shareholders. File 1040 x The deduction limits apply to an S corporation and to each shareholder. File 1040 x The S corporation allocates its deduction to the shareholders who then take their section 179 deduction subject to the limits. File 1040 x Figuring taxable income for an S corporation. File 1040 x   To figure taxable income (or loss) from the active conduct by an S corporation of any trade or business, you total the net income and losses from all trades or businesses actively conducted by the S corporation during the year. File 1040 x   To figure the net income (or loss) from a trade or business actively conducted by an S corporation, you take into account the items from that trade or business that are passed through to the shareholders and used in determining each shareholder's tax liability. File 1040 x However, you do not take into account any credits, tax-exempt income, the section 179 deduction, and deductions for compensation paid to shareholder-employees. File 1040 x For purposes of determining the total amount of S corporation items, treat deductions and losses as negative income. File 1040 x In figuring the taxable income of an S corporation, disregard any limits on the amount of an S corporation item that must be taken into account when figuring a shareholder's taxable income. File 1040 x Other Corporations A corporation's taxable income from its active conduct of any trade or business is its taxable income figured with the following changes. File 1040 x It is figured before deducting the section 179 deduction, any net operating loss deduction, and special deductions (as reported on the corporation's income tax return). File 1040 x It is adjusted for items of income or deduction included in the amount figured in 1, above, not derived from a trade or business actively conducted by the corporation during the tax year. File 1040 x How Do You Elect the Deduction? You elect to take the section 179 deduction by completing Part I of Form 4562. File 1040 x If you elect the deduction for listed property (described in chapter 5), complete Part V of Form 4562 before completing Part I. File 1040 x For property placed in service in 2013, file Form 4562 with either of the following. File 1040 x Your original 2013 tax return, whether or not you file it timely. File 1040 x An amended return for 2013 filed within the time prescribed by law. File 1040 x An election made on an amended return must specify the item of section 179 property to which the election applies and the part of the cost of each such item to be taken into account. File 1040 x The amended return must also include any resulting adjustments to taxable income. File 1040 x You must keep records that show the specific identification of each piece of qualifying section 179 property. File 1040 x These records must show how you acquired the property, the person you acquired it from, and when you placed it in service. File 1040 x Election for certain qualified section 179 real property. File 1040 x   You can elect to expense certain qualified real property that you placed in service as section 179 property for tax years beginning in 2013. File 1040 x If you elect to treat this property as section 179 property, you must elect the application of the special rules for qualified real property described in section 179(f) of the Internal Revenue Code. File 1040 x   To make the election, attach a statement indicating you are “electing the application of section 179(f) of the Internal Revenue Code” with either of the following. File 1040 x Your original 2013 tax return, whether or not you file it timely. File 1040 x An amended return for 2013 filed within the time prescribed by law. File 1040 x The amended return must also include any adjustments to taxable income. File 1040 x   The statement should indicate your election to expense certain qualified real property under section 179(f) on your return. File 1040 x It must specify one or more of the three types of qualified property (described under Qualified real property ) to which the election applies, the cost of each such type, and the portion of the cost of each such property to be taken into account. File 1040 x Also, report this on line 6 of Form 4562. File 1040 x    The maximum section 179 expense deduction that can be taken for qualified section 179 real property is limited to $250,000. File 1040 x Revoking an election. File 1040 x   An election (or any specification made in the election) to take a section 179 deduction for 2013 can be revoked without IRS approval by filing an amended return. File 1040 x The amended return must be filed within the time prescribed by law. File 1040 x The amended return must also include any resulting adjustments to taxable income. File 1040 x Once made, the revocation is irrevocable. File 1040 x When Must You Recapture the Deduction? You may have to recapture the section 179 deduction if, in any year during the property's recovery period, the percentage of business use drops to 50% or less. File 1040 x In the year the business use drops to 50% or less, you include the recapture amount as ordinary income in Part IV of Form 4797. File 1040 x You also increase the basis of the property by the recapture amount. File 1040 x Recovery periods for property are discussed under Which Recovery Period Applies in chapter 4 . File 1040 x If you sell, exchange, or otherwise dispose of the property, do not figure the recapture amount under the rules explained in this discussion. File 1040 x Instead, use the rules for recapturing depreciation explained in chapter 3 of Publication 544 under Section 1245 Property. File 1040 x For qualified real property (described earlier), see Notice 2013-59 for determining the portion of the gain that is attributable to section 1245 property upon the sale or other disposition of qualified real property. File 1040 x If the property is listed property (described in chapter 5 ), do not figure the recapture amount under the rules explained in this discussion when the percentage of business use drops to 50% or less. File 1040 x Instead, use the rules for recapturing excess depreciation in chapter 5 under What Is the Business-Use Requirement. File 1040 x Figuring the recapture amount. File 1040 x   To figure the amount to recapture, take the following steps. File 1040 x Figure the depreciation that would have been allowable on the section 179 deduction you claimed. File 1040 x Begin with the year you placed the property in service and include the year of recapture. File 1040 x Subtract the depreciation figured in (1) from the section 179 deduction you claimed. File 1040 x The result is the amount you must recapture. File 1040 x Example. File 1040 x In January 2011, Paul Lamb, a calendar year taxpayer, bought and placed in service section 179 property costing $10,000. File 1040 x The property is not listed property. File 1040 x The property is 3-year property. File 1040 x He elected a $5,000 section 179 deduction for the property and also elected not to claim a special depreciation allowance. File 1040 x He used the property only for business in 2011 and 2012. File 1040 x In 2013, he used the property 40% for business and 60% for personal use. File 1040 x He figures his recapture amount as follows. File 1040 x Section 179 deduction claimed (2011) $5,000. File 1040 x 00 Minus: Allowable depreciation using Table A-1 (instead of section 179 deduction):   2011 $1,666. File 1040 x 50   2012 2,222. File 1040 x 50   2013 ($740. File 1040 x 50 × 40% (business)) 296. File 1040 x 20 4,185. File 1040 x 20 2013 — Recapture amount $ 814. File 1040 x 80 Paul must include $814. File 1040 x 80 in income for 2013. File 1040 x If any qualified zone property placed in service during the year ceases to be used in an empowerment zone by an enterprise zone business in a later year, the benefit of the increased section 179 deduction must be reported as other income on your return. File 1040 x Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications
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The File 1040 X

File 1040 x 34. File 1040 x   Crédito Tributario por Hijos Table of Contents Introduction Useful Items - You may want to see: Hijo Calificado Cantidad de CréditoLímites del Crédito Cómo Reclamar el Crédito Crédito Tributario Adicional por Hijos Cómo Completar el Anexo 8812 (Formulario 1040A o Formulario 1040)Parte I Partes II a IV Introduction El crédito tributario por hijos es un crédito que puede reducir su impuesto hasta $1,000 por cada uno de sus hijos calificados. File 1040 x El crédito tributario adicional por hijos es un crédito que podría tomar en el caso de que no pueda reclamar la cantidad completa del crédito tributario por hijos. File 1040 x Este capítulo le explica lo siguiente: Quién es un hijo calificado. File 1040 x La cantidad del crédito. File 1040 x Cómo se puede reclamar el crédito. File 1040 x El crédito tributario por hijos y el crédito tributario adicional por hijos no deben confundirse con el crédito por gastos del cuidado de menores y dependientes, el cual se explica en el capítulo 32. File 1040 x Si no está sujeto al pago de impuestos. File 1040 x   Algunos créditos, tales como el crédito tributario por hijos o el crédito por gastos del cuidado de menores y dependientes, se usan para reducir el impuesto. File 1040 x Si la cantidad del impuesto en la línea 46 del Formulario 1040 o en la línea 28 del Formulario 1040A es cero, no calcule el crédito tributario por hijos ya que no hay impuesto que se pueda reducir. File 1040 x Sin embargo, podría reunir los requisitos para el crédito tributario adicional por hijos en la línea 65 (Formulario 1040) o en la línea 39 (Formulario 1040A). File 1040 x Useful Items - You may want to see: Publicación 972 Child Tax Credit (Crédito tributario por hijos), en inglés Formulario (e Instrucciones) Anexo 8812   (Formulario 1040A o 1040) Child Tax Credit (Crédito tributario por hijos), en inglés W-4(SP) Certificado de Exención de Retenciones del Empleado W-4 Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate (Certificado de exención de retenciones del empleado), en inglés Hijo Calificado Un hijo calificado, para propósitos del crédito tributario por hijos, es aquél que: Es su hijo o hija, hijastro o hijastra, hijo de crianza, hermano o hermana, hermanastro o hermanastra o descendiente de cualquiera de ellos (por ejemplo, su nieto, nieta, sobrina o sobrino), Tenía menos de 17 años de edad al finalizar el año 2013, No proveyó más de la mitad de su propia manutención durante el año 2013, Vivió con usted durante más de la mitad del año 2013 (vea Excepciones al tiempo vivido con usted , más adelante), Fue reclamado como dependiente en la declaración de usted, No presenta una declaración conjunta para el año (o la presenta solamente para reclamar un reembolso), y Era ciudadano, nacional o residente de los Estados Unidos. File 1040 x Si el hijo fue adoptado, vea Hijo adoptivo , más adelante. File 1040 x Para cada hijo calificado, tiene que marcar el recuadro que aparece en la línea 6c del Formulario 1040 o del Formulario 1040A. File 1040 x Ejemplo 1. File 1040 x Su hijo cumplió 17 años de edad el día 30 de diciembre del año 2013. File 1040 x Él es ciudadano de los Estados Unidos y usted lo declara como dependiente en la declaración de impuestos. File 1040 x Su hijo no es hijo calificado para el crédito tributario por hijos porque no tenía menos de 17 años de edad al finalizar el año 2013. File 1040 x Ejemplo 2. File 1040 x Su hija cumplió 8 años en el año 2013. File 1040 x Ella no es ciudadana de los Estados Unidos, tiene un ITIN y vivió en México durante todo el año 2013. File 1040 x Ella no es un hijo calificado para el crédito tributario por hijos debido a que no fue residente de los Estados Unidos en 2013. File 1040 x Contribuyentes que tienen determinados hijos dependientes con un número de identificación personal del contribuyente (ITIN, por sus siglas en inglés). File 1040 x   Si está reclamando un crédito tributario por hijos o un crédito tributario adicional por hijos basándose en un hijo que identificó en su declaración de impuestos con un número de identificación personal del contribuyente (ITIN, por sus siglas en inglés), en lugar de un número de Seguro Social (SSN, por sus siglas en inglés), tiene que completar la Parte I del Anexo 8812 (Formulario 1040A o 1040). File 1040 x   Aun si su hijo es dependiente suyo, sólo puede reclamar un crédito tributario por hijos o un crédito tributario adicional por hijos basándose en un dependiente que sea ciudadano, nacional o residente de los Estados Unidos. File 1040 x Para ser tratado como residente de los Estados Unidos, un hijo normalmente tiene que cumplir el requisito de presencia sustancial. File 1040 x Para más información sobre el requisito de presencia sustancial, vea la Publicación 519, U. File 1040 x S. File 1040 x Tax Guide for Aliens (Guía sobre los impuestos federales estadounidenses para extranjeros), en inglés. File 1040 x Hijo adoptivo. File 1040 x   A un hijo adoptivo siempre se le trata como si fuera su hijo. File 1040 x Un hijo adoptivo incluye un niño colocado en su hogar por una agencia autorizada, con la intención de que sea legalmente adoptado. File 1040 x   Si usted es ciudadano o nacional de los EE. File 1040 x UU. File 1040 x y su hijo adoptivo vivió con usted como integrante de su unidad familiar durante todo el año en 2013, dicho hijo cumple el requisito (7), anteriormente, para ser un hijo calificado para propósitos del crédito tributario por hijos. File 1040 x Excepciones al tiempo vivido con usted. File 1040 x   Se considera que un hijo vivió con usted más de la mitad del año 2013 si nació o murió en el año 2013, y su hogar (el de usted) fue el hogar del hijo más de la mitad del tiempo en el cual estuvo vivo. File 1040 x Las ausencias temporales por usted o su hijo debidas a circunstancias especiales, tales como las ausencias por educación, vacaciones, negocios, atención médica, servicio militar o estancia en un centro de detención para delincuentes juveniles cuentan como tiempo que el hijo vivió con usted. File 1040 x   También hay excepciones para hijos secuestrados e hijos de padres divorciados o separados. File 1040 x Para detalles, vea Requisito de Residencia , en el capítulo 3. File 1040 x Hijo calificado de más de una persona. File 1040 x   Se aplica una regla especial si su hijo calificado es el hijo calificado de más de una persona. File 1040 x Para detalles, vea Requisito Especial para el Hijo Calificado de Más de una Persona , en el capítulo 3. File 1040 x Cantidad de Crédito La cantidad máxima de crédito que puede reclamar es $1,000 por cada hijo calificado. File 1040 x Límites del Crédito Usted tiene que reducir su crédito tributario por hijos si la condición (1) o la condición (2) le corresponde: La cantidad de la línea 46 (Formulario 1040) o de la línea 28 (Formulario 1040A) es menor que el crédito. File 1040 x Si esta cantidad es cero, no puede reclamar este crédito porque no hay impuesto que se pueda reducir. File 1040 x Sin embargo, es posible que pueda tomar el crédito tributario adicional por hijos. File 1040 x Vea Crédito Tributario Adicional por Hijos , más adelante. File 1040 x Su ingreso bruto ajustado (AGI, por sus siglas en inglés) modificado es mayor que la cantidad que se indica a continuación para su estado civil para efectos de la declaración. File 1040 x Casados que presentan una declaración conjunta: $110,000. File 1040 x Soltero, cabeza de familia o viudo que reúne los requisitos: $75,000. File 1040 x Casados que presentan la declaración por separado: $55,000. File 1040 x Ingresos brutos ajustados modificados. File 1040 x   Para propósitos del crédito tributario por hijos, su ingreso bruto ajustado (AGI, por sus siglas en inglés) modificado es su ingreso bruto ajustado más las cantidades siguientes que puedan ser aplicables en su caso: Toda cantidad excluida del ingreso debido a la exclusión de ingresos de fuentes de  Puerto Rico. File 1040 x En la línea de puntos directamente al lado de la línea 38 del Formulario 1040, anote la cantidad excluida e indentifíquela como “ EPRI. File 1040 x ” Además, adjunte una copia de todo Formulario 499R-2/W-2PR a su declaración. File 1040 x Toda cantidad de las líneas 45 ó 50 del Formulario 2555, Foreign Earned Income (Ingreso devengado en el extranjero), en inglés. File 1040 x Toda cantidad de la línea 18 del Formulario 2555-EZ, Foreign Earned Income Exclusion (Exclusión de ingreso devengado en el extranjero), en inglés. File 1040 x Toda cantidad de la línea 15 del Formulario 4563, Exclusion of Income for Bona Fide Residents of American Samoa (Exclusión del ingreso para residentes bona fide de la Samoa Estadounidense), en inglés. File 1040 x   Si no tiene ninguna de las cantidades mencionadas anteriormente, su ingreso bruto ajustado modificado es igual a su ingreso bruto ajustado. File 1040 x Ingreso bruto ajustado. File 1040 x   El ingreso bruto ajustado (AGI, por sus siglas en inglés) es la cantidad de la línea 38 del Formulario 1040 o de la línea 22 del Formulario 1040A. File 1040 x Cómo Reclamar el Crédito Para reclamar el crédito tributario por hijos, tiene que presentar el Formulario 1040 o el Formulario 1040A. File 1040 x No puede reclamar el crédito tributario por hijos en el Formulario 1040EZ. File 1040 x Tiene que proveer el nombre y número de identificación (normalmente el número de Seguro Social) de cada hijo calificado en su declaración de impuestos. File 1040 x Si reclama el crédito tributario por hijos con un hijo identificado por un ITIN, usted también tiene que presentar el Anexo 8812. File 1040 x Para calcular el crédito, primero revise la Child Tax Credit Worksheet (Hoja de trabajo del crédito tributario por hijos), en las Instrucciones para el Formulario 1040 o el Formulario 1040A. File 1040 x Si se le indica que consulte la Publicación 972, Child Tax Credit (Crédito tributario por hijos), en inglés, no puede utilizar la Hoja de trabajo de las instrucciones en la declaración de impuestos; en su lugar, usted tiene que utilizar la Publicación 972, en inglés, para calcular el crédito. File 1040 x Si no se le indica que utilice la Publicación 972, puede usar la Hoja de trabajo del crédito tributario por hijos, que se encuentra en las Instrucciones para el Formulario 1040 o las Instrucciones para el Formulario 1040A o la Publicación 972, todas en inglés, para calcular el crédito. File 1040 x Crédito Tributario Adicional por Hijos Este crédito es para determinadas personas que reciban menos de la cantidad total del crédito tributario por hijos. File 1040 x El crédito tributario adicional por hijos puede darle un reembolso aunque no adeude ningún impuesto. File 1040 x Cómo se reclama el crédito tributario adicional por hijos. File 1040 x   Para reclamar el crédito tributario adicional por hijos, siga los pasos que aparecen a continuación: Asegúrese de haber calculado la cantidad, si existe, de su crédito tributario por hijos. File 1040 x Vea anteriormente el tema titulado Cómo Reclamar el Crédito . File 1040 x Use las Partes II a la IV del Anexo 8812 para determinar si puede reclamar el crédito tributario adicional por hijos si usted contestó “Yes” (Sí) en la línea 9 ó 10 de la Child Tax Credit Worksheet (Hoja de trabajo del crédito tributario por hijos) en las Instrucciones para el Formulario 1040 o en las Instrucciones para el Formulario 1040A, o en la línea 13 de la Child Tax Credit Worksheet (Hoja de trabajo del crédito tributario por hijos) en la Publicación 972, todas en inglés. File 1040 x Si tiene un crédito tributario adicional por hijos en la línea 13 del Anexo 8812, anótelo en la línea 65 del Formulario 1040 o en la línea 39 del Formulario 1040A. File 1040 x Cómo Completar el Anexo 8812 (Formulario 1040A o Formulario 1040) El Anexo 8812 tiene cuatro partes, pero se puede considerar como que consta de dos secciones. File 1040 x La Parte I es independiente de las Partes II a la IV. File 1040 x Si todos sus hijos tienen números de Seguro Social o números de identificación del contribuyente para adopción del IRS(ATIN, por sus siglas en inglés),y usted no reclama el crédito tributario adicional por hijos, no necesita completar ni adjuntar el Anexo 8812 a su declaración de impuestos. File 1040 x Parte I Usted sólo necesitará completar la Parte I si está reclamando el crédito tributario por hijos para un hijo que aparece identificado con un número de identificación personal del contribuyente del IRS (ITIN, por sus siglas en inglés). File 1040 x Si todos los hijos por los cuales usted marcó la casilla en la columna 4 de la línea 6c de su Formulario 1040 o Formulario 1040A tienen números de Seguro Social (SSN, por sus siglas en inglés) o números de identificación del contribuyente para adopción del IRS (ATIN, por sus siglas en inglés), no tiene que completar la Parte I del Anexo 8812. File 1040 x Partes II a IV Las Partes II a la IV le ayudan a calcular el crédito adicional por hijos que le corresponde a usted. File 1040 x Por lo general, deberá completar las Partes II a la IV únicamente si se le indica luego de que completa la Hoja de trabajo del crédito tributario por hijos que aparece en las instrucciones de su declaración de impuestos o en la Publicación 972. File 1040 x Vea Cómo se reclama el crédito tributario adicional por hijos , anteriormente. File 1040 x Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications