Filing Your Taxes Online is Fast, Easy and Secure.
Start now and receive your tax refund in as little as 7 days.

1. Get Answers

Your online questions are customized to your unique tax situation.

2. Maximize your Refund

Find tax credits for everything from school tuition to buying a hybri

3. E-File for FREE

E-file free with direct deposit to get your refund in as few as 7 days.

Filing your taxes with paper mail can be difficult and it could take weeks for your refund to arrive. IRS e-file is easy, fast and secure. There is no paperwork going to the IRS so tax refunds can be processed in as little as 7 days with direct deposit. As you prepare your taxes online, you can see your tax refund in real time.

FREE audit support and representation from an enrolled agent – NEW and only from H&R Block

2010 Tax

Irs Income Tax Forms 2010Amend 2011 Tax Return OnlineState Taxes For MilitaryIrs File1040ez CalculatorFree Back Tax FilingTax Planning Us 1040Filing Taxes2010 Tax Forms 1040aWhere To File 2012 Federal Income Tax ReturnSelf Employed Tax CalculatorState Income Tax ReturnsTurbo Tax Free State EfileAmended State Tax FormPrint Free 1040ez Tax Form1040nr Ez Online FilingFederal Income Tax Rates 20121040 ComFile My 2010 Taxes FreeFree Online Federal Tax Filing 20121040-xFree E File IrsIrs Extension FormsFiling State Tax ReturnHow To Fill Out An Amended Tax FormFree Amended Tax Return1040x TurbotaxFree Tax Estimator 2011Amendment Return1040ez WorksheetFree E File Extension2011 1040 Form DownloadHow To Ammend A Tax Return2011 Amended Tax Form2011 Form 1040ezState Tax Forms 2012Irs RefundFile Amended Tax Return 2012Amending Tax ReturnFile Tax Amendment Online

2010 Tax

2010 tax 5. 2010 tax   Credits Table of Contents Credit for the Elderly or the DisabledCan You Take the Credit? Figuring the Credit Child and Dependent Care Credit Earned Income Credit (EIC)Do You Qualify for the Earned Income Credit (EIC)? Figuring the EIC This chapter briefly discusses the credit for the elderly or disabled, the child and dependent care credit, and the earned income credit. 2010 tax You may be able to reduce your federal income tax by claiming one or more of these credits. 2010 tax Credit for the Elderly or the Disabled This section explains who qualifies for the credit for the elderly or the disabled and how to figure this credit. 2010 tax For more information, see Publication 524, Credit for the Elderly or the Disabled. 2010 tax You can take the credit only if you file Form 1040 or Form 1040A. 2010 tax You cannot take the credit if you file Form 1040EZ or Form 1040NR. 2010 tax Can You Take the Credit? You can take the credit for the elderly or the disabled if you meet both of the following requirements. 2010 tax You are a qualified individual. 2010 tax Your income is not more than certain limits. 2010 tax  You can use Figure 5-A and Figure 5-B as guides to see if you are eligible for the credit. 2010 tax   Qualified Individual You are a qualified individual for this credit if you are a U. 2010 tax S. 2010 tax citizen or resident alien, and either of the following applies. 2010 tax You were age 65 or older at the end of 2013. 2010 tax You were under age 65 at the end of 2013 and all three of the following statements are true. 2010 tax You retired on permanent and total disability (explained later). 2010 tax You received taxable disability income for 2013. 2010 tax On January 1, 2013, you had not reached mandatory retirement age (defined later under Disability income ). 2010 tax Age 65. 2010 tax You are considered to be age 65 on the day before your 65th birthday. 2010 tax Therefore, you are considered to be age 65 at the end of 2013 if you were born before January 2, 1949. 2010 tax Figure 5-A. 2010 tax Are You a Qualified Individual? This image is too large to be displayed in the current screen. 2010 tax Please click the link to view the image. 2010 tax Figure 5-A, Are you a qualified individual? U. 2010 tax S. 2010 tax citizen or resident alien. 2010 tax   You must be a U. 2010 tax S. 2010 tax citizen or resident alien (or be treated as a resident alien) to take the credit. 2010 tax Generally, you cannot take the credit if you were a nonresident alien at any time during the tax year. 2010 tax Exceptions. 2010 tax   You may be able to take the credit if you are a nonresident alien who is married to a U. 2010 tax S. 2010 tax citizen or resident alien at the end of the tax year and you and your spouse choose to treat you as a U. 2010 tax S. 2010 tax resident alien. 2010 tax If you make that choice, both you and your spouse are taxed on your worldwide income. 2010 tax   If you were a nonresident alien at the beginning of the year and a resident alien at the end of the year, and you were married to a U. 2010 tax S. 2010 tax citizen or resident alien at the end of the year, you may be able to choose to be treated as a U. 2010 tax S. 2010 tax resident alien for the entire year. 2010 tax In that case, you may be allowed to take the credit. 2010 tax   For information on these choices, see chapter 1 of Publication 519, U. 2010 tax S. 2010 tax Tax Guide for Aliens. 2010 tax Married persons. 2010 tax   Generally, if you are married at the end of the tax year, you and your spouse must file a joint return to take the credit. 2010 tax However, if you and your spouse did not live in the same household at any time during the tax year, you can file either a joint return or separate returns and still take the credit. 2010 tax Head of household. 2010 tax   You can file as head of household and qualify to take the credit even if your spouse lived with you during the first 6 months of the year if you meet certain tests. 2010 tax See Publication 524 and Publication 501. 2010 tax Under age 65. 2010 tax   If you are under age 65 at the end of 2013, you can qualify for the credit only if you are retired on permanent and total disability and have taxable disability income (discussed later under Disability income ). 2010 tax You are considered to be under age 65 at the end of 2013 if you were born after January 1, 1949. 2010 tax You are retired on permanent and total disability if: You were permanently and totally disabled when you retired, and You retired on disability before the end of the tax year. 2010 tax   Even if you do not retire formally, you may be considered retired on disability when you have stopped working because of your disability. 2010 tax If you retired on disability before 1977 and were not permanently and totally disabled at the time, you can qualify for the credit if you were permanently and totally disabled on January 1, 1976, or January 1, 1977. 2010 tax Permanent and total disability. 2010 tax   You are permanently and totally disabled if you cannot engage in any substantial gainful activity because of your physical or mental condition. 2010 tax A physician must certify that the condition has lasted or can be expected to last continuously for 12 months or more, or that the condition can be expected to result in death. 2010 tax See Physician's statement , later. 2010 tax Substantial gainful activity. 2010 tax   Substantial gainful activity is the performance of significant duties over a reasonable period of time while working for pay or profit, or in work generally done for pay or profit. 2010 tax   Full-time work (or part-time work done at the employer's convenience) in a competitive work situation for at least the minimum wage conclusively shows that you are able to engage in substantial gainful activity. 2010 tax   Substantial gainful activity is not work you do to take care of yourself or your home. 2010 tax It is not unpaid work on hobbies, institutional therapy or training, school attendance, clubs, social programs, and similar activities. 2010 tax However, doing this kind of work may show that you are able to engage in substantial gainful activity. 2010 tax    Figure 5-B. 2010 tax Income Limits IF your filing status is. 2010 tax . 2010 tax . 2010 tax THEN even if you qualify (see Figure 5-A), you CANNOT take the credit if: Your adjusted gross income (AGI)* is equal to or more than. 2010 tax . 2010 tax . 2010 tax OR the total of your nontaxable social security and other nontaxable pension(s), annuities, or disability income is equal to or more than. 2010 tax . 2010 tax . 2010 tax single, head of household, or qualifying widow(er) with dependent child $17,500 $5,000 married filing jointly and only one spouse qualifies in Figure 5-A $20,000 $5,000 married filing jointly and both spouses qualify in Figure 5-A $25,000 $7,500 married filing separately and you lived apart from your spouse for all of 2013 $12,500 $3,750 *AGI is the amount on Form 1040A, line 22, or Form 1040, line 38      The fact that you have not worked for some time is not, of itself, conclusive evidence that you cannot engage in substantial gainful activity. 2010 tax Physician's statement. 2010 tax   If you are under age 65, you must have your physician complete a statement certifying that you were permanently and totally disabled on the date you retired. 2010 tax   You do not have to file this statement with your tax return, but you must keep it for your records. 2010 tax The Instructions for Schedule R (Form 1040A or 1040) include a statement your physician can complete and that you can keep for your records. 2010 tax Veterans. 2010 tax   If the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) certifies that you are permanently and totally disabled, you can substitute VA Form 21-0172, Certification of Permanent and Total Disability, for the physician's statement you are required to keep. 2010 tax VA Form 21-0172 must be signed by a person authorized by the VA to do so. 2010 tax You can get this form from your local VA regional office. 2010 tax Physician's statement obtained in earlier year. 2010 tax   If you got a physician's statement in an earlier year and, due to your continued disabled condition, you were unable to engage in any substantial gainful activity during 2013, you may not need to get another physician's statement for 2013. 2010 tax For a detailed explanation of the conditions you must meet, see the instructions for Schedule R (Form 1040A or 1040), Part II. 2010 tax If you meet the required conditions, you must check the box on Schedule R (Form 1040A or 1040), Part II, line 2. 2010 tax   If you checked Schedule R (Form 1040A or 1040), Part I, box 4, 5, or 6, print in the space above the box in Part II, line 2, the first name(s) of the spouse(s) for whom the box is checked. 2010 tax Disability income. 2010 tax   If you are under age 65, you must also have taxable disability income to qualify for the credit. 2010 tax   Disability income must meet the following two requirements. 2010 tax It must be paid under your employer's accident or health plan or pension plan. 2010 tax It must be included in your income as wages (or payments in lieu of wages) for the time you are absent from work because of permanent and total disability. 2010 tax Payments that are not disability income. 2010 tax   Any payment you receive from a plan that does not provide for disability retirement is not disability income. 2010 tax Any lump-sum payment for accrued annual leave that you receive when you retire on disability is a salary payment and is not disability income. 2010 tax   For purposes of the credit for the elderly or the disabled, disability income does not include amounts you receive after you reach mandatory retirement age. 2010 tax Mandatory retirement age is the age set by your employer at which you would have had to retire had you not become disabled. 2010 tax Figuring the Credit You can figure the credit yourself, or the IRS will figure it for you. 2010 tax Figuring the credit yourself. 2010 tax   If you figure the credit yourself, fill out the front of Schedule R (Form 1040A or 1040). 2010 tax Next, fill out Schedule R (Form 1040A or 1040), Part III. 2010 tax Credit figured for you. 2010 tax   If you can take the credit and you want the IRS to figure the credit for you, see Publication 524 or the Instructions for Schedule R (Form 1040A or 1040). 2010 tax If you want the IRS to figure your tax, see chapter 30 of Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax. 2010 tax Child and Dependent Care Credit You may be able to claim this credit if you pay someone to care for your dependent who is under age 13 or for your spouse or dependent who is not able to care for himself or herself. 2010 tax The credit can be up to 35% of your expenses. 2010 tax To qualify, you must pay these expenses so you can work or look for work. 2010 tax If you claim this credit, you must include on your return the name and taxpayer identification number (generally the social security number) of each qualifying person for whom care is provided. 2010 tax If the correct information is not shown, the credit may be reduced or disallowed. 2010 tax You also must show on your return the name, address, and the taxpayer identification number of the person(s) or organization(s) that provided the care. 2010 tax For more information, see Publication 503, Child and Dependent Care Expenses. 2010 tax Earned Income Credit (EIC) The earned income credit (EIC) is a refundable tax credit for certain people who work and have earned income under $51,567. 2010 tax The EIC is available to persons with or without a qualifying child. 2010 tax Credit has no effect on certain welfare benefits. 2010 tax   Any refund you receive because of the EIC cannot be counted as income when determining whether you or anyone else is eligible for benefits or assistance, or how much you or anyone else can receive, under any federal program or under any state or local program financed in whole or in part with federal funds. 2010 tax These programs include the following. 2010 tax Medicaid and supplemental security income (SSI). 2010 tax Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (food stamps). 2010 tax Low-income housing. 2010 tax Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). 2010 tax  In addition, when determining eligibility, the refund cannot be counted as a resource for at least 12 months after you receive it. 2010 tax Check with your local benefit coordinator to find out if your refund will affect your benefits. 2010 tax Do You Qualify for the Earned Income Credit (EIC)? Use Table 5-1 as an initial guide to the rules you must meet in order to qualify for the EIC. 2010 tax The specific rules you must meet depend on whether you have a qualifying child. 2010 tax If you have a qualifying child, the rules in Parts A, B, and D apply to you. 2010 tax If you do not have a qualifying child, the rules in Parts A, C, and D apply to you. 2010 tax  If, after reading all the rules in each part that applies to you, you think you may qualify for the credit, see Publication 596, Earned Income Credit, for more details about the EIC. 2010 tax You can also find information about the EIC in the instructions for Form 1040 (line 64a), Form 1040A (line 38a), or Form 1040EZ (line 8a). 2010 tax The sections that follow provide additional information for some of the rules. 2010 tax Adjusted gross income (AGI). 2010 tax   Under Rule 1, you cannot claim the EIC unless your AGI is less than the applicable limit shown in Part A of Table 5-1. 2010 tax Your AGI is the amount on line 37 (Form 1040), line 21 (Form 1040A), or line 4 (Form 1040EZ). 2010 tax Table 5-1. 2010 tax Earned Income Credit (EIC) in a Nutshell First, you must meet all the rules in this column. 2010 tax Second, you must meet all the rules in one of these columns, whichever applies. 2010 tax Third, you must meet the rule in this column. 2010 tax Part A. 2010 tax  Rules for Everyone Part B. 2010 tax  Rules If You Have a Qualifying Child Part C. 2010 tax  Rules If You Do Not Have a Qualifying Child Part D. 2010 tax  Figuring and Claiming the EIC 1. 2010 tax Your adjusted gross income (AGI) must be less than: •$46,227 ($51,567 for married filing jointly) if you have three or more qualifying children, •$43,038 ($48,378 for married filing jointly) if you have two qualifying children, •$37,870 ($43,210 for married filing jointly) if you have one qualifying child, or  •$14,340 ($19,680 for married filing jointly) if you do not have a qualifying child. 2010 tax 2. 2010 tax You must have a valid social security number. 2010 tax  3. 2010 tax Your filing status cannot be “Married filing separately. 2010 tax ” 4. 2010 tax You must be a U. 2010 tax S. 2010 tax citizen or resident alien all year. 2010 tax  5. 2010 tax You cannot file Form 2555 or Form 2555-EZ (relating to foreign earned income). 2010 tax  6. 2010 tax Your investment income must be $3,300 or less. 2010 tax  7. 2010 tax You must have earned income. 2010 tax 8. 2010 tax Your child must meet the relationship, age, residency, and joint return tests. 2010 tax  9. 2010 tax Your qualifying child cannot be used by more than one person to claim the EIC. 2010 tax  10. 2010 tax You generally cannot be a qualifying child of another person. 2010 tax 11. 2010 tax You must be at least age 25 but under age 65. 2010 tax  12. 2010 tax You cannot be the dependent of another person. 2010 tax  13. 2010 tax You generally cannot be a qualifying child of another person. 2010 tax  14. 2010 tax You must have lived in the United States more than half of the year. 2010 tax 15. 2010 tax Your earned income must be less than: •$46,227 ($51,567 for married filing jointly) if you have three or more qualifying children, •$43,038 ($48,378 for married filing jointly) if you have two qualifying children, •$37,870 ($43,210 for married filing jointly) if you have one qualifying child, or •$14,340 ($19,680 for married filing jointly) if you do not have a qualifying child. 2010 tax Social security number. 2010 tax   Under Rule 2, you (and your spouse if you are married filing jointly) must have a valid social security number (SSN) issued by the Social Security Administration (SSA). 2010 tax Any qualifying child listed on Schedule EIC also must have a valid SSN. 2010 tax (See Qualifying child , later, if you have a qualifying child. 2010 tax )   If your social security card (or your spouse's if you are married filing jointly) says “Not valid for employment” and your SSN was issued so that you (or your spouse) could get a federally funded benefit, you cannot get the EIC. 2010 tax An example of a federally funded benefit is Medicaid. 2010 tax Investment income. 2010 tax   Under Rule 6, you cannot claim the EIC unless your investment income is $3,300 or less. 2010 tax If your investment income is more than $3,300, you cannot claim the credit. 2010 tax For most people, investment income is the total of the following amounts. 2010 tax Taxable interest (line 8a of Form 1040 or 1040A). 2010 tax Tax-exempt interest (line 8b of Form 1040 or 1040A). 2010 tax Dividend income (line 9a of Form 1040 or 1040A). 2010 tax Capital gain net income (line 13 of Form 1040, if more than zero, or line 10 of Form 1040A). 2010 tax  If you file Form 1040EZ, your investment income is the total of the amount of line 2 and the amount of any tax-exempt interest you wrote to the right of the words “Form 1040EZ” on line 2. 2010 tax   For more information about investment income, see Publication 596, Earned Income Credit. 2010 tax Earned income. 2010 tax   Under Rule 7, you must have earned income to claim the EIC. 2010 tax Under Rule 15, you cannot claim the EIC unless your earned income is less than the applicable limit shown in Table 5-1, Part D. 2010 tax Earned income includes all of the following types of income. 2010 tax Wages, salaries, tips, and other taxable employee pay. 2010 tax Employee pay is earned income only if it is taxable. 2010 tax Nontaxable employee pay, such as certain dependent care benefits and adoption benefits, is not earned income. 2010 tax But there is an exception for nontaxable combat pay, which you can choose to include in earned income. 2010 tax Net earnings from self-employment. 2010 tax Gross income received as a statutory employee. 2010 tax Gross income defined. 2010 tax   Gross income means all income you received in the form of money, goods, property, and services that is not exempt from tax, including any income from sources outside the United States or from the sale of your main home (even if you can exclude part or all of it). 2010 tax Do not include any social security benefits unless (a) you are married filing a separate tax return and you lived with your spouse at any time in 2013, or (b) one-half of your social security benefits plus your other gross income and any tax-exempt interest is more than $25,000 ($32,000 if married filing jointly). 2010 tax If (a) or (b) applies, see the instructions for Form 1040, lines 20a and 20b to figure the taxable part of social security benefits you must include in gross income. 2010 tax Self-employed persons. 2010 tax   If you are self-employed and your net earnings are $400 or more, be sure to correctly fill out Schedule SE (Form 1040), Self-Employment Tax, and pay the proper amount of self-employment tax. 2010 tax If you do not, you may not get all the credit to which you are entitled. 2010 tax Disability benefits. 2010 tax   If you retired on disability, taxable benefits you receive under your employer's disability retirement plan are considered earned income until you reach minimum retirement age. 2010 tax Minimum retirement age generally is the earliest age at which you could have received a pension or annuity if you were not disabled. 2010 tax Beginning on the day after you reach minimum retirement age, payments you receive are taxable as a pension and are not considered earned income. 2010 tax   Payments you received from a disability insurance policy that you paid the premiums for are not earned income. 2010 tax It does not matter whether you have reached minimum retirement age. 2010 tax If this policy is through your employer, the amount may be shown in box 12 of your Form W-2 with code J. 2010 tax Income that is not earned income. 2010 tax   Examples of items that are not earned income under Rule 7 include interest and dividends, pensions and annuities, social security and railroad retirement benefits (including disability benefits — except for payments covered under Disability benefits earlier), alimony and child support, welfare benefits, workers' compensation benefits, unemployment compensation (insurance), nontaxable foster care payments, and veterans' benefits, including VA rehabilitation payments. 2010 tax Do not include any of these items in your earned income. 2010 tax Workfare payments. 2010 tax   Nontaxable workfare payments are not earned income for the EIC. 2010 tax These are cash payments certain people receive from a state or local agency that administers public assistance programs funded under the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program in return for certain work activities such as (1) work experience activities (including remodeling or repairing public housing) if sufficient private sector employment is not available, or (2) community service program activities. 2010 tax Qualifying child. 2010 tax   Under Rule 8, your child is a qualifying child if your child meets four tests. 2010 tax The four tests are: Relationship, Age, Residency, and Joint return. 2010 tax   The four tests are illustrated in Figure 5-C. 2010 tax See Publication 596 for more information about each test. 2010 tax Figure 5-C. 2010 tax Tests for Qualifying Child A qualifying child for the EIC is a child who is your. 2010 tax . 2010 tax . 2010 tax Son, daughter, stepchild, foster child,  or a descendant of any of them (for example, your grandchild) OR Brother, sister, half brother, half sister, stepbrother,  stepsister, or a descendant of any of them (for example, your  niece or nephew) was . 2010 tax . 2010 tax . 2010 tax Under age 19 at the end of 2013 and younger than you (or your spouse if filing jointly) OR Under age 24 at the end of 2013, a student, and younger than you (or your spouse if filing jointly) OR Permanently and totally disabled at any time during the year, regardless of age who. 2010 tax . 2010 tax . 2010 tax Is not filing a joint return for 2013  (or is filing a joint return for 2013 only as a claim for refund of income tax withheld or estimated tax paid) who. 2010 tax . 2010 tax . 2010 tax Lived with you in the United States for more than half of 2013. 2010 tax  If the child did not live with you for the required time, see Publication 596 for more information. 2010 tax Figuring the EIC To figure the amount of your credit, you have two choices. 2010 tax Have the IRS figure the EIC for you. 2010 tax If you want to do this, see IRS Will Figure the EIC for You in Publication 596. 2010 tax Figure the EIC yourself. 2010 tax If you want to do this, see How To Figure the EIC Yourself in Publication 596. 2010 tax Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications

10.8.1  Policy and Guidance

Manual Transmittal

December 23, 2013

Purpose

(1) This transmits revised Internal Revenue Manual (IRM) 10.8.1, Information Technology (IT) Security, Policy and Guidance.

Background

IRM 10.8.1 was last revised May 3, 2012. Since that update, new Executive Orders (E.O.s), federal regulations, Office of Management and Budget (OMB), E-Government Act, and Department of Treasury guidance have been issued, which implement changes to security-related policy for protection of all information and systems.

FIPS 200 mandates the use of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publication (SP) 800-53 as baseline for the creation of agency IT security policy.

IRM 10.8.1 is part of the Security, Privacy and Assurance policy family, IRM Part 10 series for IRS Information Technology Cybersecurity.

Material Changes

(1) This IRM establishes the comprehensive, uniform IT security policies to be followed by all IRS organizations.

(2) IRM 10.8.1 has been completely revised to conform to Treasury Directive Publication (TD P) 85-01, Treasury Information Technology Security Program, which provides explicit requirements and traceability back to Treasury. It also incorporates new Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requirements.

(3) IRM 10.8.1 has been completely restructured and aligned to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publication (SP) 800-53, Revision 4, Security and Privacy Controls for Federal Information Systems and Organization.

(4) The following sections have been updated/clarified with this version of IRM 10.8.1:

  1. All sections. See Exhibit 10.8.1-4, IRM 10.8.1 (May 3, 2012) to IRM 10.8.1 2013 Revision (NIST 800-53 Rev. 4) Mapping, for mapping of sections from previous to current version of the IRM.

(5) The entire IRM content is being released as guidance to facilitate implementation of the numerous updates to IRM 10.8.1 and conformance with the Treasury IT Security Program, (TD P 85-01), which provides explicit requirements and traceability back to Treasury. It also incorporates new Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requirements. The revised policy also aligns with NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 4.

(6) Editorial changes (including grammar, spelling, and minor clarification) were made throughout the IRM.

Effect on Other Documents

IRM 10.8.1 dated May 3, 2012, is superseded. Additionally, this IRM was updated to incorporate Interim Guidance # IT-10-1212-25, # IT-10-1212-24, # IT-10-0912-21, # IT-10-0912-19, # IT-10-0812-16, # IT-10-0513-07, # IT-10-0513-06, # IT-10-0613-09 and IT-10-0613-10. See Exhibit 10.8.1-5, References, IRS & Cybersecurity Memoranda, for superseded Interim Guidance Memoranda to date.

Audience

IRM 10.8.1 shall be distributed to all personnel responsible for ensuring that adequate security is provided for IRS information and information systems. This policy applies to all employees, contractors, and vendors of the IRS.

Effective Date

(12-23-2013)

Terence V. Milholland
Chief Technology Officer

10.8.1.1  (12-23-2013)
Overview

  1. This IRM lays the foundation to implement and manage security for information systems security within the IRS. It provides guidance on all aspects of security for the protection of Information Technology (IT) resources.

    1. This guidance establishes the IT security framework for the development of security control specific implementations defined in subordinate IRMs, IRS publications (e.g., IRS Publication 1075, Tax Information Security Guidelines for Federal, State and Local Agencies; IRS Publication 4812, Contractor Security Controls – Handling and Protecting Information or Information Systems), and subordinate procedural guidance (Standard Operating Procedures (SOP), Desk Procedures, etc.).

    2. Subordinate IRMs offer additional business security controls for operating systems and platforms. For further information, see Cybersecurity’s website at:
      http://it.web.irs.gov/Cybersecurity/

    3. Subordinate procedural guidance shall be used to provide detailed guidance for implementing and complying with the requirements within this IRM.

    4. For a high-level summary of an IRM, refer to the applicable Companion Guide.

    5. If there is a conflict with or variance from this IRM within the subordinate IRMs, IRS publications, or procedural guidance, IRM 10.8.1 has precedence unless specifically noted otherwise within this IRM.

  2. This policy delineates the security management structure, assigns responsibilities, and lays the foundation necessary to measure progress and compliance. The requirements within this policy are organized to follow the order in which security controls are presented within NIST SP 800-53 Revision (Rev) 4.

    1. In an effort to reference the origin of a security requirement (NIST, Treasury, etc.), a requirement may have its origin referenced in parenthesis at the end of the requirement; such as (CA-1) or (TD P 85-01 S-PM.1).

    2. As part of this revision to IRM 10.8.1, new security controls from NIST SP 800-53 Rev. 4 that are introduced to the IRM are designated with an asterisk (*) at the end of the control.

  3. In addition to referencing the origin at the end of a requirement (e.g., CA-1), a Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) 199 Security Impact-level Designator may be assigned at the end of it. This designator indicates that the requirement applies to information systems categorized at that FIPS 199 impact-level. A requirement without a Security Impact-level Designator, means the requirement applies to all information systems.

    Note:

    For example, a requirement with an indicator of (H) indicates the requirement only applies to information systems categorized as FIPS 199 Impact-level HIGH.

    1. FIPS 199 Security Impact-level Designator:

    • (L) – Applies to systems categorized as FIPS 199 Impact-level LOW.

    • (M) – Applies to systems categorized as FIPS 199 Impact-level MODERATE.

    • (H) – Applies to systems categorized as FIPS 199 Impact-level HIGH.

  4. Cybersecurity documents and publishes security controls (IRM 10.8 series) for IRS's Information Technology Environment/Resources. Authorizing Officials (AO) are required to develop and maintain additional operational documentation (e.g., action and implementation plans, SOPs), necessary for implementation of the security controls delineated in the IRM 10.8 series. Therefore, implementation of security policy is the responsibility of the AO; to include documentation and procedures for how their information systems are managed, administered and monitored.

  5. For the purpose of this IRM, the following terms apply:

    1. IRS personnel or users, which includes:
      i. Employees
      ii. Consultants
      iii. Detailees
      iv. Temporary employees
      v. Interns
      vi. IRS contractors

    2. Authorized or Unauthorized personnel applies to all IRS personnel being authorized or unauthorized to perform a particular action.

    3. "Developers" or "Application Developers" refers to "Program Developers/Programmers" and "Web Developers" as defined in IRM 10.8.2, Information Technology (IT) Security, Security Roles and Responsibilities.

      Note:

      This does not refer to DBAs, who may assist Developers.

10.8.1.1.1  (12-23-2013)
Purpose

  1. This IRM establishes the minimum baseline security policy and requirements for all IRS IT assets in order to:

    1. Protect the critical infrastructure and assets of the IRS against attacks that exploit IRS assets.

    2. Prevent unauthorized access to IRS assets.

    3. Enable IRS IT computing environments that meet the security requirements of this policy and support the business needs of the organization.

  2. It is acceptable to configure settings to be more restrictive than those defined in this IRM.

  3. To configure less restrictive controls requires a risk-based decision. See the Risk Acceptance and Risk-Based Decisions section within this IRM for additional guidance.

  4. It is the policy of the IRS:

    1. To establish and manage an Information Security Program within all its offices. This manual provides uniform policies and guidance to be used by each office.

    2. To protect all IT resources belonging to, or used by the IRS, at a level commensurate with the risk and magnitude of harm that could result from loss, misuse, or unauthorized access to that IT resource.

    3. To protect its information resources and allow the use, access, and disclosure of information in accordance with applicable laws, policies, federal regulations, Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circulars, Treasury Directives (TDs), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Publications, other regulatory guidance, and best practice methodologies.

    4. To use best practices methodologies (such as Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI), Enterprise Life Cycle (ELC), Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL), and Lean Six Sigma (LSS)) to document and improve IRS IT process and service efficiency and effectiveness.

10.8.1.1.2  (12-23-2013)
Authority

  1. Per Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) 200, Minimum Security Requirements for Federal Information and Information Systems:

    Policies and procedures play an important role in the effective implementation of enterprise-wide information security programs within the Federal Government and the success of the resulting security measures employed to protect federal information and information systems. Thus, organizations must develop and promulgate formal, documented policies and procedures governing the minimum security requirements set forth in this standard and must ensure their effective implementation.

    1. Special Publications (SPs) are developed and issued by NIST as recommendations and guidance documents. For other than national security programs and systems, federal agencies must follow those NIST Special Publications mandated in a Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS). FIPS 200 mandates the use of Special Publication 800-53, as amended. In addition, OMB policies (including OMB Reporting Instructions for Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) and Agency Privacy Management) state that for other than national security programs and systems, federal agencies must follow certain specific NIST Special Publications.

    2. While federal agencies are required to follow certain specific NIST Special Publications in accordance with OMB policy, agencies have flexibility in how to apply the guidance. Federal agencies apply the security concepts and principles articulated in the NIST Special Publications in accordance with and in the context of the agency’s missions, business functions, and environment of operation. Consequently, the application of NIST guidance by federal agencies can result in different security solutions that are equally acceptable, compliant with the guidance, and meet the OMB definition of adequate security for federal information systems.

  2. IRM 10.8.1 is issued in support of Treasury Directive Publication (TD P) 85-01, Treasury Information Technology Security Program, under the authority of Treasury Directive (TD) 85-01, Treasury Information Technology (IT) Security Program.

  3. In accordance with TD P 85-01, the IRS shall:

    Ensure that National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publication (SP) 800-53 baseline security controls (as augmented with Department- and bureau-wide controls) are augmented as needed and scoped as appropriate, and that any augmented controls and scoping results are documented.

10.8.1.1.3  (12-23-2013)
Scope

  1. This IRM covers IT security controls from NIST SP 800-53, Department of the Treasury policy, IRS-defined policy, regulatory and mandated guidance, and other sources (refer to the References section of this IRM).

  2. The provisions in this manual apply to:

    1. All offices and business, operating, and functional units within the IRS, and are to be applied when IT is used to accomplish the IRS mission.

    2. Individuals and organizations having contractual arrangements with the IRS, including employees, contractors, vendors, and outsourcing providers, which use or operate information systems that store, process, or transmit IRS Information or connect to an IRS network or system.

    3. All IRS information and information systems. For information systems that store, process, or transmit classified information, please refer to IRM 10.9.1, National Security Information, for additional procedures for protecting classified information.

    4. All IRS systems, including IRS contractor systems. Use of the term “system” in this policy is expanded to include Cloud technology, Web 2.0, and successor technologies, and is applicable to all non-national security systems. (TD P 85-01 Vol. I, 1.3)

  3. The IRS shall ensure that the product (e.g., software, hardware) and version selected is in accordance with IRS Enterprise Architecture (EA) Enterprise Standards Profile (ESP) that dictates the official products and versions of software within the IRS.

  4. The IRS shall ensure the application or system version is a version for which the vendor still offers standardized technical support.

10.8.1.1.4  (12-23-2013)
Risk Acceptance and Risk-Based Decisions

  1. Any exception to this policy requires that the Authorizing Official (AO) make a Risk-Based Decision (RBD).

  2. Risk-Based Decision requests shall be submitted in accordance with IRM 10.8.1 and use Form 14201, as described in Risk Acceptance Request and Risk-Based Decision standard operating procedures (SOPs), available on the Enterprise FISMA Compliance SharePoint site via the Risk Acceptance Requests link at:
    http://it.web.irs.gov/cybersecurity/Divisions/SRM/Policy_Guidance/risk_acceptance.htm

  3. Risk Based Decisions have replaced Deviations.

    Note:

    The term "Risk Based Decision" only applies to within the IRS; the Department of the Treasury still uses the term deviation.

  4. See TD P 85-01 for guidance on exemptions to Department-wide Controls.

10.8.1.1.4.1  (12-23-2013)
Risk Acceptance Request

  1. Security weaknesses can be discovered at any point in a system’s lifecycle and by many different means. The most common actions that lead to the discovery of weaknesses are system configuration scans, Security Assessment and Authorization (SA&A), and Enterprise Continuous Monitoring (eCM). Weaknesses can also be discovered during development activities such as unit testing, regression testing, integration testing, etc.

  2. The IRS shall allow RBD exceptions to its own IT security policies based on suitable justification and a thorough assessment of evident and potential risks.

  3. In keeping with the IRS System Development Life Cycles (SDLCs) (e.g., ELC), an RBD request is the result of an analysis of risk to organizational operations (including mission, function, image, or reputation), organizational assets, individuals, other organizations, and the Nation; and a determination that a requirement can be met (or not met) only with a RBD to an IRS IT security policy, requirement, or standard. The only two acceptable reasons for a RBD are:

    1. Meeting the requirement is technically or operationally not possible.

    2. Meeting the requirement is not cost-effective.

  4. AO can make an RBD to either allow a system to operate with a weakness unmitigated, partially mitigated, or to take the system out of operation.

    1. Refer to the Security Assessment and Authorization section for additional guidance on the responsibilities of the AO and on Security Authorization.

    2. Refer to IRM 10.8.2, for additional guidance on the responsibilities of the AO and the AO Designated Representative.

  5. An RBD shall be documented in a system’s SA&A documentation (e.g., System Security Plan).

    1. The AO’s decision (e.g., RBD) to not incorporate a security control in the security control baseline (e.g., tailoring) is not required to be tracked in a Plan of Action and Milestones (POA&M).

    2. The AO’s decision (e.g., RBD) to accept the risk associated with an identified weakness and system vulnerability shall be documented in a POA&M.

  6. Where appropriate, the Department of the Treasury Chief Information Office (CIO) justifies, approves, and documents approval of Department-wide deviations from the defined configuration baselines. Such CIO-approved “permanent” deviations are not required to be tracked in POA&Ms. (TD P 85-01 S-CVM.18)

    1. Refer to the Security Assessment and Authorization section for POA&M and Security Authorization guidance.

      Note:

      When circumstances warrant, Bureaus are encouraged to identify and justify Bureau-specific deviations limited to identified sub-populations (e.g., system administrators, or employees who travel) within their Bureaus consistent with the security principle of least privilege.

  7. IRS RBDs shall not be permanent.

    1. Prior to a RBD expiring, steps shall be taken to either renew the RBD or implement mitigation to address the weakness.
      i. If a RBD is dependent on a policy adjustment, the RBD shall remain in effect until either the policy has been adjusted or the RBD expires (whichever comes first).
      ii. When a RBD expires, the requestor shall be notified of the expiration.

  8. See the Cybersecurity web site for guidance on the Risk Based Decision process (e.g., SOP, Request Form, Renewal Form).

10.8.1.1.5  (12-23-2013)
Roles and Responsibilities

  1. The IRS shall implement security roles in accordance with federal laws and IT security guidelines (e.g., FISMA, NIST, OMB, etc.) that are appropriate for specific operations and missions.

  2. IRM 10.8.2, Information Technology Security Roles and Responsibilities, defines IRS-wide roles and responsibilities related to IRS information and computer security, and is the authoritative source for such information.

10.8.1.2  (12-23-2013)
General Policy

  1. In accordance with Title III of the E-Government Act, known as the Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA), the IRS shall develop, document, and implement a service-wide information security program supporting the operations and assets of this agency.

    1. There shall be no grandfathering of requirements contained in this IRM.

    2. There shall be no exceptions to the requirements of this IRM based on past practices.

  2. In addition to this manual and TD P 85-01, security requirements in Office of Federal Financial Management (OFFM) NO-0106, Core Financial System Requirements, January 2006, apply to Treasury financial systems as covered by that manual. Should any requirements of IRM 10.8.1, TD P 85-01 Volume 1 and OFFM NO-0106 conflict, the more stringent requirement shall apply. (TD P 85-01 S-CFS.1)

  3. Information systems approved for the processing of classified information shall not be connected to any system not approved for classified operation. Systems approved for classified processing shall not share peripherals with unclassified processing equipment except for switching devices approved by National Security Agency (NSA). Approval for the use of switching devices shall be included in the security authorization documentation.

  4. The IRS Information Security Program shall:

    1. Ensure the objectives of applicable laws, policies, federal regulations, OMB Circulars, TDs, NIST Publications, and other regulatory guidance are met by establishing and ensuring compliance with security requirements, procedures, and guidelines to properly implement security controls.

      Note:

      In situations where regulatory guidance has been released outside of the annual update cycle for IRS requirement documents, the requirements within the regulatory guidance will be met through the issuance of interim guidance.

    2. Ensure that information systems used by the IRS provide appropriate protection for the Confidentiality, Integrity, and Availability (CIA) of IRS information, through the use of cost-effective security controls.

    3. Implement policies, standards, and procedures which are consistent with government-wide policies, standards, and procedures issued by the OMB, the Department of Commerce, the General Services Administration (GSA), the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), and the Department of the Treasury. Different or more stringent requirements for securing National Security Information (NSI) shall be incorporated into agency programs as required by appropriate national security directives.

    4. Provide for the protection of critical infrastructure by identifying critical assets and individual, proprietary, financial, tax, mission critical, or otherwise sensitive information in accordance with Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD) 7 Critical Infrastructure Identification, Prioritization and Protection,.

    5. Review each interdependency analysis and provide updates at least every three (3) years or whenever there has been a significant change to the critical asset or its environment impacting the value chain.

    6. Ensure the ability to maintain processing during and following an emergency.

    7. Ensure the auditability of all information systems.

    8. Ensure management is responsible for designating the sensitivity of information, providing security controls, and certifying adequacy of these controls.

    9. Ensure management accountability for resources entrusted to them in accomplishing IRS objectives.

    10. Ensure individual accountability for the data, information, and other IT resources to which individuals have access.

      Note:

      Implementation of the security controls defined within this IRM address the IRS Information Security Program requirements explicitly or implicitly.

  5. The IRS Information Security Program shall include:

    1. Risk assessments that consider internal and external threats to the CIA of systems and data supporting critical operations and assets.

    2. Policies and procedures that address the risk assessments associated with the operations and assets for programs and systems by cost effectively reducing information security risks to an acceptable level, and ensuring compliance with prescribed policies and procedures.

    3. Security Awareness Training and Education (SATE) to inform personnel of information security risks, procedures designed to reduce such risks, and their personal impact/responsibilities for both.

    4. Management testing and evaluation of the effectiveness of information security policies and procedures.

    5. A process for ensuring remedial action is defined for addressing deficiencies.

    6. Procedures for detecting, reporting, and responding to security incidents; mitigation of risks associated with such incidents before substantial damage occurs; notification/consultation with appropriate law enforcement officials and other offices/authorities.

    7. Appropriate reporting to proper authorities of weaknesses and remedial actions.

  6. The IRS shall implement the provisions of FISMA to include the guidelines outlined in NIST publications, OMB circulars, and FIPS.

  7. All IRS information systems that generate, store, process, transfer, display, or communicate non-national security information shall be protected at a level commensurate with the potential impact of a loss of confidentiality, integrity, or availability on IRS’s operations, assets, or individuals.

  8. Information systems in a Development and Testing Environment shall adhere to the security requirements within this IRM based on an assessment of risk and the system’s assigned FIPS 199 categorization level.

    1. See the Risk Assessment and Security Categorization sections of this IRM for guidance on conducting an assessment of risk and defining security categorization levels.

  9. This policy and all Cybersecurity IRMs shall be evaluated a minimum of annually to ensure consistency with the IRS mission, functions, and associated laws, directives, regulations, and standards.

    Note:

    Implementation of the security controls defined within this IRM address the IRS Information Security Program requirements explicitly or implicitly.

10.8.1.3  (12-23-2013)
Program Management Security Controls

  1. FISMA requires organizations to develop and implement an organization-wide information security program to address information security for the information and information systems that support the operations and assets of the organization, including those provided or managed by another organization, contractor, or other source.

    1. The program management controls have been designed to facilitate compliance with applicable federal laws, executive orders, directives, policies, regulations, and standards.

    2. The program management controls are independent of any FIPS Publication 200 impact levels and therefore, are not directly associated with any of the security control baselines.

    3. The program controls do, however, complement the security controls within this manual and focus on the programmatic, organization-wide information security requirements that are independent of any particular information system and are essential for managing information security programs.

    4. Program management controls are documented in the organization-wide information security program plan.
      i. The organization-wide information security program plan supplements the individual security plans developed for each organizational information system.
      ii. Together, the security plans for the individual information systems and the information security program cover the totality of security controls employed by the organization.

10.8.1.3.1  (12-23-2013)
PM-1 Information Security Program Plan

  1. The IRS shall: (PM-1)

    1. Develop and disseminate an IRS-wide Information Security Program plan that:
      i. Provides an overview of the requirements for the security program and a description of the security program management controls and common controls in place or planned for meeting those requirements.
      ii. Is approved by a senior official with responsibility and accountability for the risk being incurred to organizational operations (including mission, functions, image, and reputation), organizational assets, individuals, other organizations, and the Nation.
      iii. Includes the identification and assignment of the following:
      • Roles
      • Responsibilities
      • Management commitment
      • Coordination among IRS entities
      • Compliance
      iv. Reflects coordination among organizational entities responsible for the different aspects of information security (i.e., technical, physical, personnel, cyber-physical).

    2. Review the IRS-wide information security program plan every three (3) years (or when there are significant changes).

    3. Update the plan to address organizational changes and problems identified during plan implementation or security control assessments.

    4. Protect the information security program plan from unauthorized disclosure and modification.

  2. The IRS shall establish and implement an IRS IT security review and assistance program and conduct security reviews of information systems/operations. (TD P 85-01 P-SOC&A.1)

  3. Copies of approved draft and final IRS IT security policies and standards shall be provided to the Department of the Treasury. (TD P 85-01 P-SOC&A.2)

    Note:

    "Approved draft" means a draft approved for formal bureau coordination purposes, not just a working draft.

  4. The IRS shall assist and provide requested materials to the Treasury Associate Chief Information Officer (ACIO) for Cybersecurity (ACIOCS) as it conducts activities in support of its oversight and central reporting role. (TD P 85-01 P-SOC&A.3)

10.8.1.3.2  (12-23-2013)
PM-2 Senior Agency Information Security Officer (SAISO)/Chief Information Security Officer (CISO)

  1. The IRS shall appoint a senior information security officer with the mission and resources to coordinate, develop, implement, and maintain an organization-wide information security program. (PM-2)

    1. Refer to IRM 10.8.2 for additional guidance.

10.8.1.3.3  (12-23-2013)
PM-3 Information Security Resources

  1. The IRS shall: (PM-3)

    1. Ensure that each capital planning and investment request includes the resources needed to implement the information security program and documents all exceptions to this requirement.

    2. Employ a business case (e.g., OMB Circular A-11, Preparation, Submission, and Execution of the Budget) to record the resources required.

    3. Ensure that information security resources are available for expenditure as planned.

      Note:

      An Investment Review Board (or similar group) may be designated and empowered to manage and provide oversight for the information security-related aspects of the capital planning and investment control process. Business cases for IT investments are covered in OMB Circular A-11.

10.8.1.3.4  (12-23-2013)
PM-4 Plan of Action and Milestones (POA&M) Process

  1. The IRS shall: (PM-4)

    1. Implement a process for ensuring that Plans of Action and Milestones (POA&M) for the security program and associated organizational information systems:
      i. Are developed and maintained.
      ii. Document the remedial information security actions to adequately respond to risk to organizational operations and assets, individuals, other organizations, and the Nation.
      iii. Are reported in accordance with OMB FISMA reporting requirements.

    2. Review POA&Ms for consistency with the organizational risk management strategy and organization-wide priorities for risk response actions.

      Note:

      POA&Ms are a key document in the security authorization package and are subject to federal reporting requirements established by the OMB. POA&M updates are based on the findings from security control assessments, security impact analyses, and continuous monitoring activities. OMB FISMA reporting guidance contains instructions regarding organizational plans of action and milestones.

  2. The IRS shall ensure the development and management of a process to track actions to correct IT security weaknesses. (TD P 85-01 P-POA&M.1)

10.8.1.3.5  (12-23-2013)
PM-5 Information System Inventory

  1. The IRS shall develop and maintain an inventory of information systems. (PM-5)

    Note:

    This control addresses the inventory requirements in FISMA. OMB provides guidance on developing information systems inventories and associated reporting requirements.

  2. The IRS shall maintain a comprehensive inventory of information systems and relevant security information for those systems. (TD P 85-01 P-INV.1)

  3. The inventory shall, at a minimum, contain information as shall be prescribed by the Department of the Treasury in supplemental guidance. (TD P 85-01 P-INV.2)

  4. The IRS shall provide the Department of the Treasury with periodic inventory updates to the Treasury-wide inventory on the Treasury-established schedule. (TD P 85-01 P-INV.3)

10.8.1.3.6  (12-23-2013)
PM-6 Information Security Measures of Performance

  1. The IRS shall develop, monitor, and report on the results of information security measures of performance. (PM-6)

    Note:

    Measures of performance are outcome-based metrics used by an organization to measure the effectiveness or efficiency of the information security program and the security controls employed in support of the program.

  2. The IRS shall define performance metrics to evaluate the effectiveness of the IT Security program within the organization. (TD P 85-01 P-MS.1)

    Note:

    These need not extend beyond those FISMA and related metrics established Treasury-wide.

  3. The IRS shall report on FISMA and other related metrics (e.g., Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP)) to the Department of the Treasury periodically as may be required in supplemental guidance. (TD P 85-01 P-MS.2)

  4. As the Department of the Treasury builds out its Security Information Management capability, the IRS shall provide security-related situational awareness data feeds to the Department of the Treasury as required in supplemental guidance, to support a Treasury-wide Security Information Management capability. (TD P 85-01 P-MS.3)

10.8.1.3.7  (12-23-2013)
PM-7 Enterprise Architecture

  1. The IRS shall develop an enterprise architecture with consideration for information security and the resulting risk to organizational operations, organizational assets, individuals, other organizations, and the Nation. (PM-7)

  2. The IRS shall document the security enterprise architecture following OMB Circular A-130, Transmittal Memorandum #4, Management of Federal Information Resources (November 28, 2000). (TD P 85-01 P-SEA.1)

  3. The IRS shall ensure security is fully integrated into their architecture framework and the security architecture is based on the latest Trust Model in the Treasury Enterprise Architecture Framework, as well as the taxonomy of the latest Federal Enterprise Architecture Framework. (TD P 85-01 P-SEA.2)

  4. The IRS shall review and update the security enterprise architecture data based on the enterprise architecture timeframes. (TD P 85-01 P-SEA.3)

    Note:

    The Office of Management and Budget’s Federal Enterprise Architecture web site provides additional guidance, as does NIST Special Publication 800-60, Guide for Mapping Types of Information and Information Systems to Security Categories, Volumes I and II, Version 2.0, June 2004.

  5. The IRS’s HSPD-12 transition plan shall align with the government-wide architecture as described in the Federal CIO Council’s “Federal Identity, Credential, and Access Management Roadmap and Implementation Guidance.” For further information, see www.idmanagement.gov.

10.8.1.3.8  (12-23-2013)
PM-8 Critical Infrastructure Plan

  1. The IRS shall address information security issues in the development, documentation, and updating of a critical infrastructure and key resources protection plan. (PM-8)

    Note:

    Protection strategies are based on the prioritization of critical assets and resources. The requirement and guidance for defining critical infrastructure and key resources and for preparing an associated critical infrastructure protection plan are found in applicable federal laws, Executive Orders, directives, policies, regulations, standards, and guidance.

  2. Treasury Designated Critical Infrastructure shall be identified in the FISMA Reporting and Tracking system as a CIP asset. (TD P 85-01 P-CIP.1)

  3. All new and existing FIPS 199 HIGH systems must complete the CIP Assets, Functions, and Services Evaluation Questionnaire every twelve (12) months. (TD P 85-01 P-CIP.2)

  4. All new FIPS 199 MODERATE and HIGH systems shall complete the CIP Assets, Functions, and Services Evaluation Questionnaire as part of their initial SA&A to receive an Approval to Operate (ATO). (TD P 85-01 P-CIP.3)

  5. All new or existing systems that support Treasury Mission Essential Functions (MEF), as reported by the Office of Emergency Programs, shall complete the CIP Assets, Functions, and Services Evaluation Questionnaire every twelve (12) months. (TD P 85-01 P-CIP.4)

  6. When a system is identified as potential critical infrastructure by Department of the Treasury CIO, the IRS shall complete a new CIP Assets, Functions, and Services Evaluation Questionnaire within fifteen (15) business days. (TD P 85-01 P-CIP.5)

  7. Treasury Designated Critical Infrastructure shall be rated FIPS 199 HIGH for Availability. (TD P 85-01 P-CIP.6)

    Note:

    Critical infrastructure at the Department of the Treasury are identified as only supporting the department’s Mission Essential Functions (MEFs). Treasury’s MEFs are those critical functions identified as supporting the critical missions of the department. The MEFs become Primary Mission Essential Functions (PMEFs) when they also support the Continuity of Government (COG). Since the MEFs and PMEFs must be quickly recoverable (under twelve (12) hours for a PMEF1) when impacted by an incident, it is determined that all FISMA systems identified as Critical Infrastructure/Key Resource (CI/KR) shall be rated as FIPS 199 HIGH for Availability.

  8. Bureaus with Treasury Designated Critical Infrastructure shall complete planning of an Interdependency Analysis for the system within twelve (12) months of its critical infrastructure designation. (TD P 85-01 P-CIP.7)

    1. The Interdependency Analysis shall be completed within 24 months and submitted to the FISMA Reporting and Tracking system.

  9. The IRS shall review each Interdependency Analysis, update as needed, at a minimum every three (3) years or whenever there has been a significant change to the critical infrastructure or its environment. (TD P 85-01 P-CIP.8)

  10. Bureaus with Treasury Designated Critical Infrastructure shall complete a Business Impact Analysis (BIA) prior to ATO. (TD P 85-01 P-CIP.9)

    1. The BIA shall be included in the system’s Contingency Plan (e.g., appendix) or its own document.

  11. The IRS shall create and maintain a prioritized list of their critical infrastructure. (TD P 85-01 P-CIP.10)

  12. See TD P 85-01 Vol I, Appendix J - Cyber CIP Program Plan, for complete Cyber CIP policy and guidance.

10.8.1.3.9  (12-23-2013)
PM-9 Risk Management Strategy

  1. The IRS shall: (PM-9)

    1. Develop a comprehensive strategy to manage risk to organizational operations and assets, individuals, other organizations, and the Nation associated with the operation and use of information systems.

    2. Implement the risk management strategy consistently across the organization.

    3. Review and update the risk management strategy every three (3) years or as required, to address organizational changes.

    Note:

    An organization-wide risk management strategy includes, for example, an unambiguous expression of the risk tolerance for the organization, acceptable risk assessment methodologies, risk mitigation strategies, a process for consistently evaluating risk across the organization with respect to the organization’s risk tolerance, and approaches for monitoring risk over time. The use of a risk executive function can facilitate a consistent, organization-wide application of the risk management strategy. The organization-wide risk management strategy can be informed by risk-related inputs from other sources both internal and external to the organization to ensure the strategy is both broad-based and comprehensive.

10.8.1.3.10  (12-23-2013)
PM-10 Security Authorization Process

  1. The IRS shall: (PM-10)

    1. Manage (i.e., document, track, and report) the security state of organizational information systems and the environments in which those systems operate through security authorization processes.

    2. Designate individuals to fulfill specific roles and responsibilities within the organizational risk management process.

    3. Fully integrate the security authorization processes into an organization-wide risk management program.

    Note:

    Security authorization processes for information systems and environments of operation require the implementation of an organization-wide risk management process, a Risk Management Framework, and the associated security standards and guidelines. Specific roles within the risk management process include an organizational risk executive (function) and designated authorizing officials for each organizational information system and common control provider. Security authorization processes are integrated with organizational continuous monitoring processes to facilitate ongoing understanding and acceptance of risk to organizational operations and assets, individuals, other organizations, and the Nation.

10.8.1.3.11  (12-23-2013)
PM-11 Mission/Business Process Definition

  1. As part of program management, the IRS shall: (PM-11)

    1. Define mission/business processes with consideration for information security and the resulting risk to organizational operations, organizational assets, individuals, other organizations, and the Nation.

    2. Determine information protection needs arising from the defined mission/business processes and revise the processes as necessary, until achievable protection needs are obtained.

    Note:

    Information protection needs are technology-independent, required capabilities to counter threats to organizations, individuals, or the Nation through the compromise of information (i.e., loss of confidentiality, integrity, or availability). Information protection needs are derived from the mission/business needs defined by the organization, the mission/business processes selected to meet the stated needs, and the organizational risk management strategy. Information protection needs determine the required security controls for the organization and the associated information systems supporting the mission/business processes. Inherent in defining an organization’s information protection needs is an understanding of the level of adverse impact that could result if a compromise of information occurs. The security categorization process is used to make such potential impact determinations. Mission/business process definitions and associated information protection requirements are documented by the organization in accordance with organizational policy and procedure.

10.8.1.3.12  (12-23-2013)
PM-12 Insider Threat Program

  1. The IRS shall implement an insider threat program that includes a cross-discipline insider threat incident handling team. (PM-12)*

    Note:

    Insider threat programs can leverage the existence of incident handling teams organizations may already have in place, such as computer security incident response teams.

    Note:

    Human resources records are especially important in this effort, as there is compelling evidence to show that some types of insider crimes are often preceded by nontechnical behaviors in the workplace (e.g., ongoing patterns of disgruntled behavior and conflicts with coworkers and other colleagues). These precursors can better inform and guide organizational officials in more focused, targeted monitoring efforts. The participation of a legal team is important to ensure that all monitoring activities are performed in accordance with appropriate legislation, directives, regulations, policies, standards, and guidelines. Insider threat programs have clearly defined policies and consistent enforcement to achieve maximum effectiveness.

10.8.1.3.13  (12-23-2013)
PM-13 Information Security Workforce

  1. The IRS shall establish an information security workforce development and improvement program. (PM-13)*

    Note:

    Information security workforce development and improvement programs include, for example: (i) defining the knowledge and skill levels needed to perform information security duties and tasks; (ii) developing role-based training programs for individuals assigned information security roles and responsibilities; and (iii) providing standards for measuring and building individual qualifications for incumbents and applicants for information security-related positions. Such workforce programs can also include associated information security career paths to encourage: (i) information security professionals to advance in the field and fill positions with greater responsibility; and (ii) organizations to fill information security-related positions with qualified personnel. Information security workforce development and improvement programs are complementary to organizational security awareness and training programs. Information security workforce development and improvement programs focus on developing and institutionalizing core information security capabilities of selected personnel needed to protect organizational operations, assets, and individuals.

10.8.1.3.14  (12-23-2013)
PM-14 Testing, Training, and Monitoring

  1. The IRS shall: (PM-14)*

    1. Implement a process for ensuring that organizational plans for conducting security testing, training, and monitoring activities associated with organizational information systems:
      - Are developed and maintained.
      - Continue to be executed in a timely manner.

    2. Review testing, training, and monitoring plans for consistency with the organizational risk management strategy and organization-wide priorities for risk response actions.

10.8.1.3.15  (12-23-2013)
PM-15 Contacts with Security Groups and Associations

  1. The IRS shall establish and institutionalize contact with selected groups and associations within the security community: (PM-15)*

    1. To facilitate ongoing security education and training for organizational personnel.

    2. To maintain currency with recommended security practices, techniques, and technologies.

    3. To share current security-related information including threats, vulnerabilities, and incidents.

      Note:

      Security groups and associations include, for example, special interest groups, forums, professional associations, news groups, and/or peer groups of security professionals in similar organizations. Organizations select groups and associations based on organizational missions/business functions. Organizations share threat, vulnerability, and incident information consistent with applicable federal laws, Executive Orders, directives, policies, regulations, standards, and guidance.

10.8.1.3.16  (12-23-2013)
PM-16 Threat Awareness Program

  1. The IRS shall implement a threat awareness program that includes a cross-organization information-sharing capability. (PM-16)*

    Note:

    Because of the constantly changing and increasing sophistication of adversaries, especially the advanced persistent threat (APT), it is becoming more likely that adversaries may successfully breach or compromise organizational information systems. One of the best techniques to address this concern is for organizations to share threat information. This can include, for example, sharing threat events (i.e., tactics, techniques, and procedures) that organizations have experienced, mitigations that organizations have found are effective against certain types of threats, threat intelligence (i.e., indications and warnings about threats that are likely to occur). Threat information sharing may be bilateral (e.g., government-commercial cooperatives, government-government cooperatives), or multilateral (e.g., organizations taking part in threat-sharing consortia). Threat information may be highly sensitive requiring special agreements and protection, or less sensitive and freely shared.

10.8.1.4  (12-23-2013)
Security Controls, Enhancements, and Supplemental Guidance

  1. The security controls within this manual provide a range of safeguards and countermeasures for the IRS and IRS information systems.

    1. There may, on occasion, be redundancy in requirements that appear in the security controls and control enhancements within this IRM and potentially other subordinate IRMs. This overlap in requirements is intended to reinforce the security requirements from the perspective of multiple controls and/or enhancements.

10.8.1.4.1  (12-23-2013)
AC-1 Access Control Policy and Procedures

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

      Note:

      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  7. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  8. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  9. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  10. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  11. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  12. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  13. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.1  (12-23-2013)
AC-2 Account Management

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

      Note:

      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    7. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  7. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.1.1  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

      Note:

      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

      Note:

      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.1.2  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.1.3  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡

  7. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.1.4  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.1.5  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.1.6  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.1.7  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  7. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  8. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  9. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  10. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  11. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  12. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  13. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  14. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  15. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  16. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  17. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.1.8  (12-23-2013)
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

      Note:

      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.1.8.1  (12-23-2013)
Unauthorized Access (UNAX)

  1. The willful unauthorized access or inspection of taxpayer records is referred to as UNAX (Unauthorized Access). (IRS-defined control)

  2. On August 5, 1997, President Clinton signed the Taxpayer Browsing Protection Act into law. Under the law: (IRS-defined control)

    1. Willful unauthorized access or inspection of non-computerized taxpayer records, including hard copies of returns - as well as computerized information - is a crime, punishable upon conviction, by fines, prison terms, and termination of employment.

    2. Taxpayers have the right to take legal action when they are victims of unlawful access or inspection - even if a taxpayer’s information is never revealed to a third party.

    3. When managers or employees are criminally charged, the Service is required to notify taxpayers that their records have been accessed without authorization.

  3. IRS personnel shall only be allowed access to taxpayer records when the information is needed to carry out their tax administration duties. (IRS-defined control)

  4. The provisions and applicable criminal penalties under the Taxpayer Browsing Protection Act shall also apply to all contractors and contractor employees. (IRS-defined control)

  5. The IRS shall establish a program to ensure that all personnel understand what UNAX is and what the consequences are if they access or inspect taxpayer records for other than authorized tax administration reasons. (IRS-defined control)

  6. Cybersecurity shall manage a centralized evaluation capability, including the consistency of actions taken, to oversee compliance with the UNAX policy and program. (IRS-defined control)

  7. Cybersecurity shall be responsible for reporting on the progress of the IRS's efforts being taken and making recommendations for improving the effectiveness of the UNAX program to IRS’s Management. (IRS-defined control)

  8. The IRS shall conduct annual awareness briefings that focus attention on the prevention of willful unauthorized access and inspection of taxpayer returns/tax return information. (IRS-defined control)

  9. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.1.9  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.1.10  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    7. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    8. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  7. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  8. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  9. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  10. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  11. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  12. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  13. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  14. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  15. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  16. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  17. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  18. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  19. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  20. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  21. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.1.11  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.2  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.3  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.4  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

      Note:

      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

      Note:

      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.5  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.5.1  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

      Note:

      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.6  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

      Note:

      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.7  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  5. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  6. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡

  7. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  8. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.8  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.9  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.10  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

      Note:

      ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.10.1  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.11  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    Note:

    ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    4. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  3. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.12  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.13  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

    2. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

10.8.1.4.1.14  ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡
≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

  1. ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡ ≡

The 2010 Tax

2010 tax 26. 2010 tax   Gastos de Automóvil y Otros Gastos de Negocio del Empleado Table of Contents Qué Hay de Nuevo Introduction Useful Items - You may want to see: Gastos de ViajeViajes Lejos de Su Domicilio Domicilio Tributario Trabajo o Asignación Temporal ¿Qué Gastos de Viaje se Pueden Deducir? Viajes en los Estados Unidos Viajes Fuera de los Estados Unidos Convenciones Gastos de EntretenimientoLímite del 50% ¿Qué Gastos de Entretenimiento se Pueden Deducir? ¿Qué Gastos de Entretenimiento no se Pueden Deducir? Gastos por Regalos Gastos de TransportePersonal en Reserva de las Fuerzas Armadas. 2010 tax Cargos de estacionamiento. 2010 tax Publicidad en el automóvil. 2010 tax Uso compartido de automóviles. 2010 tax Transporte de herramientas o instrumentos. 2010 tax Gastos de desplazamiento de sindicalistas desde el centro del sindicato. 2010 tax Gastos de Automóvil Mantenimiento de DocumentaciónCómo Demostrar los Gastos Cuánto Tiempo Tiene que Guardar Documentación y Recibos Cómo Hacer la DeclaraciónRegalos. 2010 tax Empleados estatutarios. 2010 tax Reembolsos Cómo Llenar los Formularios 2106 y 2106-EZ Reglas Especiales Qué Hay de Nuevo Tarifa estándar por milla. 2010 tax  El costo de operar su auto para fines comerciales se calcula con la tarifa estándar por milla, que para el 2013 es de 56½ centavos por milla. 2010 tax Los gastos de automóvil y el uso de la tarifa estándar por milla se explican bajo Gastos de Transporte , más adelante. 2010 tax Límites de depreciación de automóviles, camiones y camionetas. 2010 tax  En 2013, el límite sobre la deducción que puede tomar en el primer año por: la deducción total permitida por la sección 179; la provisión especial por depreciación; y la deducción por depreciación de automóviles permanecerá en $11,160 ($3,160 si elige no tomar la provisión especial por depreciación). 2010 tax Para camiones y camionetas, el límite del primer año permanecerá en $11,360 ($3,360 si elige no tomar la provisión especial por depreciación). 2010 tax Para información adicional, consulte Depreciation limits (Límites de depreciación) en la Publicación 463, en inglés. 2010 tax Introduction Es posible que pueda deducir los gastos ordinarios y necesarios relacionados con los negocios en los que haya incurrido para: Viajes, Entretenimiento, Donaciones o Transporte. 2010 tax Un gasto ordinario es aquél que es común y reconocido en el ámbito de su ocupación, negocio o profesión. 2010 tax Un gasto necesario es aquél que es útil e indicado para su negocio. 2010 tax Un gasto no tiene que ser obligatorio para considerarse necesario. 2010 tax Este capítulo explica: Qué gastos se pueden deducir. 2010 tax Cómo se declaran los gastos en la declaración de impuestos. 2010 tax Qué documentación necesita para demostrar sus gastos. 2010 tax Cómo tratar los reembolsos de gastos que reciba. 2010 tax Quién no necesita usar este capítulo. 2010 tax   Si usted es empleado, no necesitará leer este capítulo si se cumplen todos los siguientes: Rindió cuentas detalladas a su empleador por sus gastos relacionados con el trabajo. 2010 tax Recibió un reembolso total de sus gastos. 2010 tax Su empleador le exigió que devolviera todo reembolso en exceso y usted así lo hizo. 2010 tax No hay ninguna cantidad anotada con un código “L” en el recuadro 12 de su Formulario W-2, Wage and Tax Statement (Comprobante de salarios y retención de impuestos), en inglés. 2010 tax Si se cumplen todos estos requisitos, no hay necesidad de anotar los gastos o los reembolsos en la declaración. 2010 tax Vea Reembolsos , más adelante, si desea leer más información sobre reembolsos y cómo rendir cuentas a su empleador. 2010 tax    Si reúne estas condiciones y su empleador incluyó reembolsos en su Formulario W-2 por error, pídale a su empleador un Formulario W-2 corregido. 2010 tax Useful Items - You may want to see: Publicación 463 Travel, Entertainment, Gift, and Car Expenses (Gastos de viaje, entretenimiento, donaciones y automóvil), en inglés 535 Business Expenses (Gastos de negocio), en inglés Formularios (e Instrucciones) Anexo A (Formulario 1040) Itemized Deductions (Deducciones detalladas), en inglés Anexo C (Formulario 1040) Profit or Loss From Business (Pérdidas o ganancias del negocio), en inglés Anexo C-EZ (Formulario 1040) Net Profit From Business (Utilidad neta del negocio), en inglés Anexo F (Formulario 1040) Profit or Loss From Farming (Pérdidas o ganancias de actividades agropecuarias), en inglés Formulario 2106 Employee Business Expenses (Gastos de negocio del empleado), en inglés Formulario 2106-EZ Unreimbursed Employee Business Expenses (Gastos de negocio del empleado no reembolsados), en inglés Gastos de Viaje Si viaja temporalmente a un lugar fuera de su domicilio tributario, puede usar esta sección para determinar si tiene gastos de viaje deducibles. 2010 tax Esta sección trata de: Viajes lejos de su domicilio, Domicilio tributario, Trabajo o asignación temporal, y Qué gastos de viaje se pueden deducir. 2010 tax Además, explica la asignación para comidas, las reglas con respecto a viajes dentro y fuera de los Estados Unidos y gastos de convenciones deducibles. 2010 tax Definición de gastos de viaje. 2010 tax   Para propósitos tributarios, los gastos de viaje son los gastos ordinarios y necesarios (definidos anteriormente) en los que se ha incurrido al viajar lejos de su domicilio por negocios, por su profesión o trabajo. 2010 tax   Puede encontrar ejemplos de gastos de viaje deducibles en la Tabla 26-1. 2010 tax Viajes Lejos de Su Domicilio Se considera que usted está viajando lejos de su domicilio si: A fin de cumplir sus responsabilidades, tiene que alejarse del área general de su domicilio tributario (definido más adelante) durante un tiempo sustancialmente más largo que un día normal de trabajo y Necesita dormir o descansar para satisfacer las exigencias de su trabajo mientras está lejos de su domicilio. 2010 tax Este requisito de descanso no se cumple con sólo dormir una siesta en el automóvil. 2010 tax No tiene que estar lejos de su domicilo tributario un día entero, ni del anochecer al amanecer, siempre que el descanso de sus responsabilidades dure lo bastante como para permitirle dormir o descansar lo necesario. 2010 tax Ejemplo 1. 2010 tax Usted es conductor de trenes. 2010 tax Sale de su terminal de origen en un viaje de ida y vuelta normalmente programado entre dos ciudades y regresa a casa 16 horas más tarde. 2010 tax Durante el transcurso, tiene 6 horas libres en el punto de destino y consume dos comidas y alquila una habitación de hotel para dormir lo necesario antes de iniciar el viaje de regreso. 2010 tax En este caso, se considera que usted ha estado lejos de su domicilio. 2010 tax Ejemplo 2. 2010 tax Usted es camionero. 2010 tax Sale de su terminal y regresa más tarde el mismo día. 2010 tax En el punto de destino, tiene una hora libre para comer. 2010 tax Debido a que dicha hora libre no le permite dormir lo necesario y este corto período de tiempo libre no sirve para descansar lo suficiente, se considera que no viaja lejos de su domicilio. 2010 tax Miembros de las Fuerzas Armadas. 2010 tax   Si es miembro de las Fuerzas Armadas estadounidenses y está de servicio permanente en el extranjero, no se considera que viaja lejos de su domicilio. 2010 tax No puede deducir sus gastos por comida y alojamiento. 2010 tax No puede deducir estos gastos aunque tenga que mantener una vivienda en los Estados Unidos para sus familiares, a los que no se les permite acompañarle al extranjero. 2010 tax Si se le traslada de un puesto de servicio permanente a otro, quizás pueda deducir gastos de mudanza, los cuales se explican en la Publicación 521, Moving Expenses (Gastos de mudanza), en inglés. 2010 tax    Un oficial naval asignado a un puesto de servicio permanente a bordo de un buque con instalaciones normales para vivir y comer tiene un domicilio tributario a bordo del buque para propósitos de gastos de viaje. 2010 tax Domicilio Tributario Para determinar si se considera que viaja lejos de su domicilio, primero tiene que determinar la ubicación de su domicilio tributario. 2010 tax Por regla general, su domicilio tributario es su lugar de negocios o puesto de servicio normal, independientemente de dónde mantenga su domicilio familiar. 2010 tax Abarca toda la ciudad o área general en la cual está ubicado su negocio o trabajo. 2010 tax Si tiene más de un solo lugar de negocios, su domicilio tributario es su lugar de negocios principal. 2010 tax Vea Lugar principal de negocios o trabajo , más adelante. 2010 tax Si no tiene un lugar de negocios principal o normal debido a la naturaleza de su trabajo, es posible que su domicilio tributario sea el lugar donde vive normalmente. 2010 tax Vea Ningún lugar principal de negocios o trabajo , más adelante. 2010 tax Si no tiene un lugar de negocios o puesto de servicio normal y no vive en un lugar fijo, a usted se le considera empleado itinerante (transitorio) y su domicilio tributario es dondequiera que trabaje. 2010 tax Como empleado itinerante, no puede declarar una deducción por gastos de viaje ya que a usted nunca se le considera estar de viaje lejos de casa. 2010 tax Lugar principal de negocios o trabajo. 2010 tax   Si tiene más de un solo lugar de negocios o trabajo, tenga en cuenta lo siguiente al determinar cuál de los dos es su lugar principal de negocios o trabajo. 2010 tax El tiempo total que suele trabajar en cada lugar. 2010 tax El nivel de su actividad comercial en cada lugar. 2010 tax Si el ingreso procedente de sus actividades en cada lugar es considerable o no. 2010 tax Ejemplo. 2010 tax Usted vive en Cincinnati donde tiene un trabajo de temporada 8 meses al año y gana $40,000. 2010 tax Trabaja en Miami durante los 4 meses que quedan del año, también como empleado de temporada, y gana $15,000. 2010 tax Puesto que usted dedica la mayor parte de su tiempo a trabajar en Cincinnati y gana la mayor parte de sus ingresos allí, Cincinnati es su lugar principal de trabajo. 2010 tax Ningún lugar principal de negocios o trabajo. 2010 tax   Es posible que tenga un domicilio tributario aunque no tenga un lugar principal o normal de negocios o trabajo. 2010 tax Su domicilio tributario puede ser el hogar donde vive normalmente. 2010 tax Condiciones usadas para determinar el domicilio tributario. 2010 tax   Si no tiene un lugar principal o normal de negocios o trabajo, use las tres condiciones siguientes para determinar dónde está ubicado su domicilio tributario. 2010 tax Realiza parte de sus actividades comerciales en el área de su domicilio principal y se aloja en dicho domicilio mientras hace negocios en el área. 2010 tax Tiene gastos de vida en su domicilio principal y los duplica debido a que tiene que ausentarse de dicho domicilio por motivos de su negocio. 2010 tax No ha abandonado el área en la cual están el lugar en que usted típicamente se alojaba en el pasado y su domicilio principal declarado; uno o varios miembros de su familia viven en su domicilio principal; o usted se aloja a menudo en dicho domicilio. 2010 tax   Si se cumplen las tres condiciones, su domicilio tributario es el domicilio donde vive normalmente. 2010 tax Si se cumplen sólo dos condiciones, es posible que tenga un domicilio tributario, dependiendo de todos los hechos y circunstancias. 2010 tax Si se cumple sólo una condición, usted se considera itinerante; su domicilio tributario es dondequiera que trabaje y no puede deducir gastos de viaje. 2010 tax Ejemplo. 2010 tax Usted es soltero y vive en un apartamento que alquila en Boston. 2010 tax Trabaja para su empleador en Boston desde hace varios años. 2010 tax Su empleador lo inscribe en un programa de capacitación ejecutiva que dura 12 meses. 2010 tax Usted no espera regresar a Boston después de terminar el programa de capacitación. 2010 tax Durante la capacitación, usted no trabaja en Boston. 2010 tax En lugar de ello, recibe formación en aulas o en lugares de trabajo diferentes a través de los Estados Unidos. 2010 tax Mantiene su apartamento en Boston y regresa al mismo a menudo. 2010 tax Usa su apartamento para llevar a cabo sus asuntos personales. 2010 tax Además, se mantiene en contacto con sus conocidos en la comunidad de Boston. 2010 tax Cuando usted completa su programa de capacitación, a usted lo trasladan a Los Angeles. 2010 tax Usted no cumple la condición (1) porque no trabajó en Boston. 2010 tax Sí cumple la condición (2) porque tuvo gastos de vida duplicados. 2010 tax También cumple la condición (3) porque no abandonó su apartamento en Boston como su domicilio principal, mantuvo el contacto con sus conocidos en la comunidad y regresó varias veces a vivir en su apartamento. 2010 tax Por lo tanto, usted tiene un domicilio tributario en Boston. 2010 tax Domicilio tributario distinto al hogar familiar. 2010 tax   Si usted (y su familia) no vive en su domicilio tributario (definido anteriormente), no puede deducir el costo de viajes entre su domicilio tributario y su hogar familiar. 2010 tax Tampoco puede deducir el costo de comida y alojamiento mientras está en su domicilio tributario. 2010 tax Vea el Ejemplo 1 , más adelante. 2010 tax   Si trabaja temporalmente en la misma ciudad donde viven usted y su familia, tal vez se considere que usted haya viajado lejos de su domicilio. 2010 tax Vea el Ejemplo 2 , más adelante. 2010 tax Ejemplo 1. 2010 tax Usted es camionero y vive con su familia en Tucson. 2010 tax Trabaja para una compañia de transporte de camiones cuya terminal está ubicada en Phoenix. 2010 tax Después de viajes largos, usted vuelve a la terminal de origen en Phoenix y pasa la noche allí antes de regresar a casa. 2010 tax No puede deducir ningún gasto en que haya incurrido por comida y alojamiento en Phoenix ni el costo de viajar de Phoenix a Tucson, ya que Phoenix es su domicilio tributario. 2010 tax Ejemplo 2. 2010 tax Su domicilio familiar está en Pittsburgh, donde trabaja 12 semanas al año. 2010 tax El resto del año trabaja para el mismo empleador en Baltimore. 2010 tax En Baltimore, usted come en restaurantes y duerme en una casa de huéspedes. 2010 tax Su sueldo sigue igual independientemente de si está en Pittsburgh o en Baltimore. 2010 tax Debido a que pasa la mayor parte de sus horas de trabajo y gana la mayor parte de su salario en Baltimore, esa ciudad es su domicilio tributario. 2010 tax No puede deducir gasto alguno en el que haya incurrido por comida y alojamiento en ese lugar. 2010 tax No obstante, cuando regresa a trabajar a Pittsburgh, usted está fuera de su domicilio tributario a pesar de que se aloja en su domicilio familiar. 2010 tax Puede deducir el costo de su viaje de ida y vuelta entre Baltimore y Pittsburgh. 2010 tax Usted puede deducir la parte de los gastos de vida de su família que le corresponde a usted para comida y alojamiento mientras usted esté viviendo y trabajando en Pittsburgh. 2010 tax Trabajo o Asignación Temporal Puede ser que trabaje normalmente en su domicilio tributario y también en otro sitio. 2010 tax Tal vez no le resulte práctico regresar a su domicilio tributario desde dicho sitio al fin de cada día de trabajo. 2010 tax Asignación temporal versus asignación por un tiempo indeterminado. 2010 tax   Si su asignación o trabajo fuera de su lugar principal de trabajo es temporal, su domicilio tributario no cambia. 2010 tax Se considera que está lejos de su domicilio durante todo el período en que esté fuera de su lugar principal de trabajo. 2010 tax Puede deducir sus gastos de viaje siempre que reúnan todos los requisitos de la deducción. 2010 tax Normalmente, una asignación temporal en un solo sitio es aquélla que se espera que dure (y de hecho dura) 1 año o menos. 2010 tax   No obstante, si la duración de su asignación o trabajo es indeterminada, el sitio de la asignación o trabajo se convierte en su nuevo domicilio tributario y no puede deducir sus gastos de viaje mientras esté allí. 2010 tax Se considera que la duración de una asignación o trabajo en un solo sitio es indeterminada si en realidad se espera que dure más de 1 año, independientemente de si dura de hecho más de 1 año o no. 2010 tax   Si la duración de su asignación es indeterminada, tiene que incluir en sus ingresos todas las cantidades que reciba de su empleador por gastos de vida, aun si su empleador los llama asignaciones para gastos de viaje y usted le rinde cuentas a su empleador de tales gastos. 2010 tax Es posible que pueda deducir el costo de trasladarse a su nuevo domicilio tributario como gasto de mudanza. 2010 tax Vea la Publicación 521, en inglés, para más información. 2010 tax Excepción para investigaciones o enjuiciamientos penales federales. 2010 tax   Si es empleado federal y toma parte en una investigación o enjuiciamiento penal llevado a cabo por el gobierno federal, no está sujeto a la regla de 1 año. 2010 tax Esto significa que tal vez pueda deducir gastos de viaje aun si está lejos de su domicilio tributario por más de 1 año, siempre y cuando cumpla los demás requisitos relativos a la deducción de dichos gastos. 2010 tax   Para reunir los requisitos, el Procurador General (o su representante) tiene que confirmar que usted viaja: A la petición del gobierno federal, En situación de servicio temporal y Para investigar, procesar judicialmente o proveer servicios de apoyo para la investigación o enjuiciamiento de un delito federal. 2010 tax Cómo determinar si su asignación es temporal o de duración indeterminada. 2010 tax   Tiene que determinar si su asignación es temporal o de duración indeterminada cuando comience un trabajo. 2010 tax Si espera que un trabajo o asignación dure un año o menos, se considera temporal, a menos que existan hechos o circunstancias que indiquen lo contrario. 2010 tax Una asignación o trabajo que es temporal en un principio puede convertirse en indeterminado debido a cambios en las circunstancias. 2010 tax Una serie de asignaciones al mismo sitio, todas por cortos períodos de tiempo pero que juntas abarcan un largo período de tiempo, se podrían considerar una asignación de duración indeterminada. 2010 tax Regreso a casa en días libres. 2010 tax   Si regresa a su domicilio tributario de una asignación temporal en sus días libres, no se considera que usted está lejos de su domicilio mientras está en la ciudad donde reside. 2010 tax No puede deducir el costo de sus comidas y alojamiento allí. 2010 tax Sin embargo, sí puede deducir sus gastos de viaje, incluyendo comidas y alojamiento, mientras viaja entre su lugar de trabajo temporal y su domicilio tributario. 2010 tax Puede declarar dichos gastos hasta la cantidad que le habría costado si se hubiera quedado en su lugar de trabajo temporal. 2010 tax   Si mantiene su habitación de hotel mientras regresa a su ciudad de residencia, puede deducir el costo de la habitación. 2010 tax Además, puede deducir los gastos de regresar a su ciudad de residencia hasta la cantidad que habría gastado en comida si se hubiera quedado en su lugar de trabajo temporal. 2010 tax Período condicional de trabajo. 2010 tax   Si acepta un trabajo que le obliga a mudarse, con el acuerdo de que seguirá en el puesto si cumple sus deberes de modo satisfactorio durante un período condicional, entonces el trabajo es por un tiempo indeterminado. 2010 tax No puede deducir ninguno de sus gastos por concepto de comida y alojamiento durante el período condicional. 2010 tax ¿Qué Gastos de Viaje se Pueden Deducir? Una vez que haya determinado que está viajando fuera de su domicilio tributario, puede determinar qué gastos de viaje son deducibles. 2010 tax Puede deducir gastos ordinarios y necesarios en los que incurra cuando viaje lejos de su domicilio por motivos comerciales. 2010 tax El tipo de gasto que puede deducir depende de los hechos y sus circunstancias. 2010 tax La Tabla 26-1 resume los gastos de viaje que tal vez pueda deducir. 2010 tax Es posible que tenga otros gastos de viaje deducibles que no se encuentren en esa tabla, dependiendo de los hechos y sus circunstancias. 2010 tax Cuando viaja lejos de su domicilio por motivos de negocio, debería mantener documentación de todos sus gastos y todos los pagos por adelantado que reciba de su empleador. 2010 tax Puede usar una libreta, diario, cuaderno o cualquier otro registro escrito para tomar nota de sus gastos. 2010 tax Los tipos de gastos que necesita apuntar, junto con documentos comprobantes, se describen en la Tabla 26-2, más adelante. 2010 tax Separación de costos. 2010 tax   Si tiene un solo cobro que incluye los costos de comida, entretenimiento y otros servicios (tal como alojamiento o transporte), tiene que designar qué parte del cobro iba para el costo de comidas y entretenimiento y el costo de otros servicios. 2010 tax Tiene que tener una buena razón para designar los gastos de esta manera. 2010 tax Por ejemplo, tiene que repartir sus gastos si el cargo de habitación de un hotel incluye una o más comidas. 2010 tax Gastos de viaje para otra persona. 2010 tax   Si un cónyuge, dependiente u otra persona lo acompaña a usted (o a su empleado) en un viaje de negocios o a una convención comercial, normalmente no puede deducir los gastos de viaje de aquella persona. 2010 tax Empleado. 2010 tax   Puede deducir los gastos de viaje de alguien que lo acompañe si dicha persona: Es su empleado, Tiene un propósito comercial de buena fe (bona fide) para el viaje y Por lo demás, podría deducir los gastos de viaje. 2010 tax Asociado comercial. 2010 tax   Si un asociado comercial viaja con usted y cumple los requisitos anteriores (2) y (3), usted puede deducir los gastos de viaje que corresponden a dicha persona. 2010 tax Un asociado comercial es una persona con quien usted podría esperar razonablemente llevar a cabo negocios de manera activa en su negocio. 2010 tax Un asociado comercial puede ser (o tener buenas posibilidades de convertirse en) un cliente, proveedor, empleado, agente, socio o asesor profesional actual. 2010 tax Propósito comercial de buena fe (bona fide). 2010 tax   Un propósito comercial de buena fe (bona fide) existe si puede demostrar un propósito comercial real que justifique la presencia de la persona. 2010 tax Los servicios imprevistos, como tomar apuntes en computadora o participar en actividades de entretenimiento de clientes, no son suficientes para hacer que los gastos se puedan deducir. 2010 tax Ejemplo. 2010 tax Geraldo va a Chicago en auto por motivo de negocios, y su esposa, Linda, lo acompaña. 2010 tax Linda no es la empleada de Geraldo. 2010 tax De vez en cuando, Linda toma apuntes, presta servicios parecidos y asiste a comidas de negocios con Geraldo. 2010 tax El hecho de haber prestado dichos servicios no establece que la presencia de Linda en el viaje sea necesaria para llevar a cabo los negocios de Geraldo. 2010 tax Los gastos de Linda no son deducibles. 2010 tax Geraldo paga $199 al día por una habitación doble. 2010 tax El precio diario de una habitación individual es $149. 2010 tax Geraldo puede deducir el total del costo de ir en auto a Chicago y regresar, pero sólo puede deducir $149 al día por la habitación de hotel. 2010 tax Si usa transporte público, puede deducir únicamente la tarifa que pague por sí mismo. 2010 tax Tabla 26-1. 2010 tax Gastos de Viaje que Puede Deducir Esta tabla resume los gastos que puede deducir cuando viaje lejos de su domicilio por motivo de negocios. 2010 tax SI tiene gastos por. 2010 tax . 2010 tax . 2010 tax ENTONCES usted puede deducir el costo de. 2010 tax . 2010 tax . 2010 tax transporte viajes en avión, tren, autobús o automóvil entre su domicilio y su destino de negocios. 2010 tax Si se le proveyó un boleto, o si viaja gratis conforme a un programa de viajeros frecuentes u otro programa de esta índole, su costo es cero. 2010 tax Si viaja en barco, vea Luxury Water Travel (Viajes de lujo en barco) y Cruise ships (Cruceros) (bajo Conventions (Convenciones)) en la Publicación 463, en inglés, para obtener información acerca de reglas y límites adicionales. 2010 tax taxi, autobús y limusina del aeropuerto tarifas para estos y otros tipos de transporte para viajar de ida y vuelta entre: El aeropuerto o la estación y su hotel y El hotel y el lugar de trabajo de sus clientes, el lugar de reuniones de negocios o el lugar de trabajo temporal. 2010 tax equipaje y envíos enviar equipaje y materiales de exposición o materiales de muestra entre sitios de trabajo normales y temporales. 2010 tax automóvil operar y mantener su automóvil cuando viaja lejos de su domicilio por motivo de negocios. 2010 tax Puede deducir los gastos reales o la tarifa estándar por milla, además de peajes y estacionamiento relacionados con los negocios. 2010 tax Si alquila un automóvil mientras está lejos de su domicilio por motivo de negocios, puede deducir sólo la parte de los gastos que corresponde al uso comercial. 2010 tax alojamiento y comidas su alojamiento y comidas si su viaje de negocios es de una noche o suficientemente largo para obligarlo a pararse a dormir o descansar, a fin de poder prestar sus servicios de la manera debida. 2010 tax Las comidas incluyen cantidades gastadas en comida, bebidas, impuesto y propinas relacionados con dichos artículos. 2010 tax Vea Gastos de Comidas y Gastos Imprevistos para información sobre reglas y límites adicionales. 2010 tax limpieza limpieza en seco y lavado de ropa. 2010 tax teléfono llamadas de negocios durante su viaje de negocios. 2010 tax Esto incluye comunicación de negocios por fax u otros medios de comunicación. 2010 tax propinas propinas que pague por algún gasto de esta tabla. 2010 tax otros otros gastos ordinarios y necesarios parecidos que estén relacionados con su viaje de negocios. 2010 tax Dichos gastos podrían incluir transporte hacia y desde una comida de negocios, honorarios de taquígrafo público, cargos por alquiler de computadora y por operar y mantener una casa remolque. 2010 tax Gastos de Comidas y Gastos Imprevistos Puede deducir el costo de comidas en cualesquiera de las siguientes situaciones: Si es preciso que se detenga para dormir o descansar por un período sustancial, para poder desempeñar sus funciones debidamente, mientras viaja fuera de su domicilio por motivos de negocios. 2010 tax Si la comida es entretenimiento relacionado con los negocios. 2010 tax El entretenimiento relacionado con los negocios se explica bajo Gastos de Entretenimiento , más adelante. 2010 tax La siguiente explicación trata únicamente de comidas (y gastos imprevistos) que no están relacionadas con entretenimiento. 2010 tax Gastos exagerados y extravagantes. 2010 tax   No puede deducir gastos de comida que sean exagerados o extravagantes. 2010 tax Se considera que un gasto no es extravagante si es razonable basándose en los hechos y circunstancias. 2010 tax Los gastos en cuestión no serán denegados sólo porque son mayores que una cantidad fija en dólares o porque tienen lugar en restaurantes, hoteles, clubes nocturnos o complejos turísticos de lujo. 2010 tax Límite del 50% en comidas. 2010 tax   Puede calcular sus gastos de comida utilizando cualquiera de los siguientes métodos: Costo real. 2010 tax La asignación estándar para comidas. 2010 tax Estos dos métodos se explican a continuación. 2010 tax Pero, cualquiera que sea el método que use, normalmente puede deducir sólo el 50% del costo no reembolsado de sus comidas. 2010 tax   Si se le reembolsa el costo de sus comidas, la manera en que usa el límite del 50% puede variar según si el plan de reembolsos del empleador requiera o no la rendición de cuentas. 2010 tax Si no se le reembolsa el costo, el límite del 50% corresponde independientemente de si dicho gasto de comida no reembolsado provino de viajes de negocio o entretenimiento de negocio. 2010 tax El límite del 50% se explica más adelante bajo Gastos de Entretenimiento . 2010 tax Los planes de reembolsos con rendición de cuentas y los planes de reembolsos sin rendición de cuentas se explican más adelante bajo Reembolsos . 2010 tax Costo real. 2010 tax   Puede usar el costo real de sus comidas para calcular su gasto antes del reembolso y de la aplicación del límite del 50%. 2010 tax Si utiliza este método, tendrá que mantener documentación del costo real. 2010 tax Asignación estándar para comidas. 2010 tax   Normalmente, puede usar el método de “asignación estándar para comidas” como alternativa al método del costo real. 2010 tax Le permite fijar una cantidad para sus comidas diarias y gastos imprevistos (M&IE, por sus siglas en inglés), en vez de mantener documentación de sus costos reales. 2010 tax Esta cantidad fija varía según dónde y cuándo usted viaje. 2010 tax En este capítulo, la “asignación estándar para comidas” se refiere a la tasa federal correspondiente a comida y gastos imprevistos, explicada más adelante bajo Cantidad de asignación estándar para comidas . 2010 tax Aun si usa la asignación estándar para comidas, tiene que mantener documentación para comprobar la fecha, lugar y propósito comercial de su viaje. 2010 tax Vea Mantenimiento de Documentación , más adelante. 2010 tax Gastos imprevistos. 2010 tax   El término “gastos imprevistos” significa cargos y propinas a porteros, maleteros, botones, limpiadores de hotel, camareros y otras personas en barcos y sirvientes de hotel. 2010 tax Los gastos imprevistos no incluyen gastos por lavar, limpiar o planchar ropa, impuestos sobre alojamiento o costos de telegramas o llamadas telefónicas, transporte entre lugares de alojamiento o negocio y lugares para comer o el costo de envío relacionados con la entrega de comprobantes de viaje y el pago de cargos hechos a tarjetas de crédito proporcionadas por su empleador. 2010 tax Método únicamente para gastos imprevistos. 2010 tax   Puede utilizar un método opcional (en lugar del costo real) sólo para deducir gastos imprevistos. 2010 tax La cantidad de la deducción es $5 al día. 2010 tax Puede utilizar este método sólo si no ha pagado, ni ha tenido, gasto alguno de comida. 2010 tax No puede utilizar este método para los días en que utilice la asignación estándar para comidas. 2010 tax    Los empleados federales deberían consultar las Federal Travel Regulations (Reglas para viajes federales) en www. 2010 tax gsa. 2010 tax gov. 2010 tax Busque “What GSA Offers” (Lo que ofrece el GSA) y haga clic en “Regulations: FMR, FTR & FAR” (Regulaciones: FMR, FTR y FAR) y luego en “Federal Travel Regulations (FTR)” (Reglas para viajes federales (FTR)), para saber más sobre cambios que afecten reclamaciones de reembolso. 2010 tax Es posible que corresponda el límite del 50%. 2010 tax   Si utiliza el método de la asignación estándar para la comida para calcular sus gastos de comida y no se le reembolsan o si se los reembolsan conforme a un plan de deducción de reembolsos sin rendición de cuentas, normalmente usted puede deducir sólo el 50% de la asignación estándar para comidas. 2010 tax Si se le reembolsa conforme a un plan de deducción de reembolsos con rendición de cuentas, y usted deduce cantidades que son mayores que sus reembolsos, puede deducir sólo el 50% de la cantidad sobrante. 2010 tax El límite del 50% se explica más adelante bajo Gastos de Entretenimiento . 2010 tax Ambos los planes de deducción de reembolsos con rendición de cuentas y los planes sin rendición de cuentas se explican en mayor detalle más adelante bajo Reembolsos . 2010 tax No exsiste una cantidad estándar opcional para alojamiento parecida a la asignación estándar para comidas. 2010 tax La deducción permisible por gastos de alojamiento es el costo real. 2010 tax Quién puede usar la asignación estándar para comidas. 2010 tax   Puede usar la asignación estándar para comidas independientemente de si es un empleado o trabaja por cuenta propia e independientemente de si se le reembolsan o no sus gastos de viaje. 2010 tax Uso de la asignación estándar para comidas en el caso de otros viajes. 2010 tax    Puede usar la asignación estándar para comidas para calcular los gastos de comida cuando haga viajes relacionados con bienes de inversión u otros bienes que generen ingresos. 2010 tax Además, la puede usar para calcular los gastos de comida cuando viaje para propósitos educativos calificados. 2010 tax No puede usar la asignación estándar para comidas para calcular el costo de comidas cuando viaje para propósitos médicos o caritativos. 2010 tax Cantidad de asignación estándar para comidas. 2010 tax   La asignación estándar para comidas es la tarifa federal M&IE. 2010 tax Para viajes hechos en el año 2013, la tarifa diaria correspondiente a la mayoría de las localidades pequeñas en los Estados Unidos es $46 por día. 2010 tax   La mayoría de las ciudades principales y muchas otras localidades de los Estados Unidos son designadas como zonas de alto costo, y por lo tanto, las asignaciones estándares para comidas correspondientes a dichas zonas son más altas. 2010 tax    También puede encontrar esta información (organizada según los estados) en Internet en www. 2010 tax gsa. 2010 tax gov. 2010 tax Haga clic en “ Per Diem Rates ” (Tarifas de viáticos) y luego seleccione “2013” para el período del 1 de enero del año 2013 al 30 de septiembre del año 2013 y seleccione “2014” para el período del 1 de octubre del año 2013 al 31 de diciembre del año 2013. 2010 tax No obstante, puede aplicar las tarifas que estén en vigencia antes del 1 de octubre del año 2013 para gastos de viajes hechos dentro de los Estados Unidos para el año 2013 en vez de aplicar las tarifas actualizadas. 2010 tax Tiene que utilizar de manera uniforme las tarifas para los primeros 9 meses de todo el año 2013 o las tarifas actualizadas para el período del 1 de octubre del año 2013 al 31 de diciembre del año 2013. 2010 tax   Si viaja a más de un sitio durante el mismo día, utilice la tarifa en vigencia para la zona donde se detenga a dormir o descansar. 2010 tax No obstante, si trabaja en la industria de transporte, vea Tarifa especial para trabajadores de transporte , más adelante. 2010 tax Asignación estándar de comidas para zonas fuera de los Estados Unidos continentales. 2010 tax    Las tarifas de la asignación estándar para comidas mencionadas anteriormente no corresponden a viajes en Alaska, Hawaii o cualquier otra zona fuera de los Estados Unidos continentales. 2010 tax El Departamento de Defensa es responsable de establecer las tarifas de viáticos de Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, la Samoa Estadounidense, Guam, Midway, las Islas Marianas del Norte, las Islas Vírgenes Estadounidenses, la Isla Wake y otras zonas no extranjeras fuera de los Estados Unidos continentales. 2010 tax El Departamento de Estado de los Estados Unidos es responsable de establecer las tarifas de viáticos para todas las demás zonas extranjeras. 2010 tax    Puede obtener las tarifas de viáticos para zonas no extranjeras fuera de los Estados Unidos continentales en http://www. 2010 tax defensetravel. 2010 tax dod. 2010 tax mil/site/perdiemCalc. 2010 tax cfm. 2010 tax Puede obtener todas las demás tarifas de viáticos para zonas extranjeras en www. 2010 tax state. 2010 tax gov/travel/. 2010 tax Haga clic en “ Travel Per Diem Allowances for Foreign Areas ” (Tarifas de viáticos para viajes en zonas extranjeras) bajo “ Foreign Per Diem Rates ” (Tarifas de viáticos para zonas extranjeras) para conocer las tarifas de viáticos más recientes para zonas extranjeras. 2010 tax Tarifa especial para trabajadores de transporte. 2010 tax   Puede usar una asignación especial estándar para comidas si trabaja en la industria de transporte. 2010 tax Se considera que usted trabaja en la industria de transporte si su trabajo: Conlleva directamente el transporte de personas o bienes por avión, barcaza, autobús, barco, tren o camión y Exige frecuentemente que viaje lejos de su hogar y, durante cualquier viaje en particular, suele conllevar viajes a zonas donde corresponden distintas asignaciones estándar para comidas. 2010 tax Si éste es su caso, puede declarar una asignación estándar para comidas de $59 al día ($65 para viajes fuera de los Estados Unidos continentales). 2010 tax   Al utilizar la tarifa especial para trabajadores de transporte, ya no necesita determinar la asignación estándar para comidas correspondiente a cada zona donde se detenga a dormir o descansar. 2010 tax Si escoge utilizar la tarifa especial para algún viaje, tiene que utilizar dicha tarifa especial (y no utilizar las tarifas regulares de asignación estándar para comidas) para todos los viajes que haga durante ese año. 2010 tax Asignación de viajes para los días de salida y regreso. 2010 tax   Para el día de salida y el día de regreso de su viaje por motivo de negocios, tiene que prorratear la asignación estándar para comidas (calcular una cantidad disminuida para cada día). 2010 tax Puede hacer esto utilizando uno de estos dos métodos: Método 1: Puede declarar tres cuartos de la asignación estándar de comidas. 2010 tax Método 2: Puede prorratear utilizando cualquier método que usted aplique de manera uniforme y que sea conforme a prácticas razonables de negocios. 2010 tax Ejemplo. 2010 tax Juana trabaja en New Orleans donde organiza conferencias. 2010 tax En marzo, su empleador la mandó a Washington, DC, por 3 días a fin de que asistiera a un seminario sobre planificación. 2010 tax Salió de su casa en New Orleans a las 10 de la mañana el miércoles y llegó a Washington, DC, a las 5:30 de la tarde. 2010 tax Después de pasar dos noches allí, regresó en avión a New Orleans el viernes y llegó a su casa a las 8 de la noche. 2010 tax El empleador de Juana le dio una cantidad fija para cubrir sus gastos y la incluyó en su sueldo. 2010 tax Bajo el Método 1, Juana puede declarar 2. 2010 tax 5 días de la asignación estándar de comidas para Washington, DC: tres cuartos de la tarifa diaria para el miércoles y viernes (los días de salida y regreso) y la tarifa diaria completa para el jueves. 2010 tax Bajo el Método 2, Juana también podría utilizar cualquier método que aplique de manera uniforme y que esté de acuerdo con práticas razonables de negocios. 2010 tax Por ejemplo, podría declarar 3 días de la asignación estándar para comidas aunque un empleado federal tendría que utilizar el método 1 y limitarse a sólo 2½ días. 2010 tax Viajes en los Estados Unidos La siguiente sección corresponde a viajes dentro de los Estados Unidos. 2010 tax Para este propósito, los Estados Unidos incluyen sólo los 50 estados y el Distrito de Columbia. 2010 tax El trato que se les da a sus gastos de viaje dependerá de qué parte de su viaje estaba relacionada con los negocios y qué parte tuvo lugar dentro de los Estados Unidos. 2010 tax Vea Parte del Viaje Fuera de los Estados Unidos , más adelante. 2010 tax Viaje Principalmente por Motivo de Negocios Puede deducir todos sus gastos de viaje si su viaje era totalmente para fines de negocios. 2010 tax Si hizo su viaje principalmente por motivos de negocios y, mientras estaba en su destino, se quedó más tiempo para tomarse unas vacaciones, viajó brevemente a otro lugar para fines personales o se dedicó a otras actividades personales, puede deducir los gastos de viaje relacionados con los negocios. 2010 tax Dichos gastos incluyen los gastos de transporte de ida y vuelta de su destino de negocios y cualquier otro gasto relacionado con negocios en los que se ha incurrido mientras esté en su lugar de destino. 2010 tax Ejemplo. 2010 tax Usted trabaja en Atlanta y hace un viaje de negocios a New Orleans en mayo. 2010 tax En el camino de regreso, se hospeda en casa de sus padres en Mobile. 2010 tax Gasta $1,996 en transporte, comida, alojamiento y otros gastos de viaje durante los 9 días en que usted se halla lejos de su casa. 2010 tax Si no hubiera parado en Mobile, habría estado lejos de su hogar sólo 6 días y su costo total habría sido $1,696. 2010 tax Puede deducir $1,696 por su viaje, incluido el costo de transporte de ida y vuelta de New Orleans. 2010 tax La deducción por sus comidas está sujeta al límite del 50% sobre comidas, mencionado anteriormente. 2010 tax Viaje Principalmente por Motivos Personales Si su viaje fue principalmente por motivos personales, como vacaciones, el costo entero del viaje es un gasto personal no deducible. 2010 tax No obstante, puede deducir todos los gastos en los que incurra mientras esté en su destino, con tal de que estén relacionados con su negocio. 2010 tax Un viaje a un lugar turístico o en crucero se podría considerar vacaciones, aun si la publicidad hecha por el organizador del mismo da a entender que es principalmente para fines de negocios. 2010 tax La programación de actividades de negocio secundarias durante un viaje, como ver videos o asistir a una conferencia sobre temas generales, no convertirá un viaje de vacaciones en un viaje de negocios. 2010 tax Parte del Viaje Fuera de los Estados Unidos Si una parte de su viaje ocurre fuera de los Estados Unidos, use las reglas descritas más adelante bajo Viajes Fuera de los Estados Unidos para aquella parte del viaje. 2010 tax Para la parte de su viaje dentro de los Estados Unidos, use las reglas para viajes en los Estados Unidos. 2010 tax Los viajes fuera de los Estados Unidos no incluyen viajes de un lugar a otro también en los Estados Unidos. 2010 tax La siguiente explicación le puede ayudar a determinar si su viaje tuvo lugar en su totalidad dentro de los Estados Unidos. 2010 tax Transporte público. 2010 tax   Si viaja por transporte público, cualquier lugar en los Estados Unidos en que ese vehículo haga una parada programada se considera un lugar en los Estados Unidos. 2010 tax Una vez que el vehículo salga de la última parada programada en los Estados Unidos rumbo a un lugar fuera del país, se aplican las reglas bajo Viajes Fuera de los Estados Unidos . 2010 tax Ejemplo. 2010 tax Usted viaja en avión de Nueva York a Puerto Rico con una escala programada en Miami. 2010 tax Regresa a Nueva York sin hacer escala. 2010 tax El vuelo de Nueva York a Miami se realiza en los Estados Unidos, por lo tanto, sólo el vuelo de Miami a Puerto Rico se realiza fuera de los Estados Unidos. 2010 tax Debido a que no hay ninguna escala programada entre Puerto Rico y Nueva York, se considera que todo el viaje de regreso se ha realizado fuera de los Estados Unidos. 2010 tax Automóvil privado. 2010 tax   Los viajes en automóvil privado en los Estados Unidos se consideran viajes entre lugares en los Estados Unidos, incluso cuando viaje rumbo a un destino fuera de los Estados Unidos. 2010 tax Ejemplo. 2010 tax Usted viaja en automóvil de Denver a la Ciudad de México y regresa. 2010 tax El viaje de Denver hasta la frontera y el viaje de vuelta a Denver desde la frontera se consideran viajes en los Estados Unidos y les corresponden las reglas de esta sección. 2010 tax Las reglas bajo Viajes Fuera de los Estados Unidos le corresponden a su viaje de la frontera a la Ciudad de México y de regreso a la frontera. 2010 tax Viajes Fuera de los Estados Unidos Si alguna parte de su viaje por motivo de negocios se realiza fuera de los Estados Unidos, algunas de sus deducciones por el costo de viajar a su destino y regresar podrían ser limitadas. 2010 tax Para este propósito, los Estados Unidos incluyen sólo los 50 estados y el Distrito de Columbia. 2010 tax La cantidad de los gastos de viaje que se puede deducir depende en parte de qué parte de su viaje fuera de los Estados Unidos estaba relacionada con los negocios. 2010 tax Vea el capítulo 1 de la Publicación 463, en inglés, para información sobre viajes de lujo en barco. 2010 tax Viajes Totalmente de Negocios o que se Consideran Como Tales Puede deducir todos los gastos de viaje para viajar a su destino y volver si el viaje es totalmente para propósitos de negocio o si se considera como tal. 2010 tax Viajes totalmente para propósitos de negocios. 2010 tax   Si viaja fuera de los Estados Unidos y pasa todo el tiempo dedicándose a actividades de su negocio, puede deducir todos los gastos del viaje. 2010 tax Viajes que se consideran totalmente para propósitos de negocios. 2010 tax   Aun si no pasó todo el tiempo ocupado en actividades del negocio, se considera que su viaje ha sido totalmente para fines de negocios si cumple por lo menos una de las cuatro excepciones siguientes. 2010 tax Excepción 1 − Ningún control sustancial. 2010 tax   Se considera que su viaje ha sido totalmente para propósitos de negocios si usted no tuvo control sustancial de la organización del viaje. 2010 tax El hecho de que usted controle cuándo se realiza su viaje no significa, en sí, que tenga control sustancial sobre la organización del viaje. 2010 tax   Se considera que usted no tiene control sustancial del viaje si: Es empleado al que se le reembolsó, o se le pagó, una asignación de gastos de viaje, No es pariente de su empleador y No es ejecutivo gerencial. 2010 tax    “Pariente de su empleador” se define más adelante en este capítulo bajo Viáticos y Asignaciones para Automóvil . 2010 tax   Un “ejecutivo gerencial” es un empleado que tiene autoridad y responsabilidad, sin estar sujeto a la denegación de otra persona, para tomar una decisión en cuanto a la necesidad del viaje de negocios. 2010 tax    Una persona que trabaja por cuenta propia normalmente tiene control sustancial sobre la organización de viajes de negocios. 2010 tax Excepción 2 − Fuera de los Estados Unidos por una semana como máximo. 2010 tax   Se considera que su viaje ha sido para propósitos comerciales en su totalidad si usted estuvo fuera de los Estados Unidos por una semana o menos, combinando actividades de negocio y actividades no de negocio. 2010 tax Una semana significa siete días seguidos. 2010 tax Al contar los días, no cuente el día de su salida de los Estados Unidos, pero sí cuente el día de su regreso a los Estados Unidos. 2010 tax Excepción 3 − Menos del 25% del tiempo en actividades personales. 2010 tax   Se considera que el viaje ha sido totalmente para propósitos de negocios si: Estuvo fuera de los Estados Unidos por más de una semana y Pasó menos del 25% del total de su tiempo fuera de los Estados Unidos ocupado en actividades no relacionadas con negocios. 2010 tax Para este propósito, cuente tanto el día en que empezó el viaje como el día en que terminó. 2010 tax Excepción 4 − Las vacaciones no son una razón principal. 2010 tax   Se considera que el viaje ha sido totalmente para propósitos de negocios si puede demostrar que una razón principal del viaje no era vacaciones personales, aunque tenga control sustancial de la organización del viaje. 2010 tax Viaje Principalmente por Motivo de Negocios Si viaja fuera de los Estados Unidos principalmente por motivo de negocios pero pasa una parte de su tiempo dedicándose a actividades no relacionadas con negocios, normalmente no puede deducir todos los gastos del viaje. 2010 tax Puede deducir únicamente la parte del costo de ida y vuelta del destino correspondiente al negocio. 2010 tax Tiene que repartir los costos entre sus actividades de negocios y actividades no relacionadas con negocios para determinar la cantidad deducible. 2010 tax Estas reglas de distribución de los gastos de viaje se explican en el capítulo 1 de la Publicación 463, en inglés. 2010 tax No tiene que repartir su deducción por gastos de viaje si cumple una de las cuatro excepciones elaboradas anteriormente bajo Viajes que se consideran totalmente para propósitos de negocios. 2010 tax En esos casos, puede deducir el total del costo de ida y vuelta a su destino. 2010 tax Viajes Principalmente por Motivos Personales Si viaja fuera de los Estados Unidos principalmente por vacaciones o para propósitos de inversión, el total del costo del viaje es un gasto personal no deducible. 2010 tax Si pasa una parte del tiempo asistiendo a congresos profesionales cortos o a un programa de educación continua, puede deducir los gastos de inscripción y otros gastos relacionados directamente con su negocio en los que haya incurrido. 2010 tax Convenciones Puede deducir los gastos de viaje cuando asista a una convención si puede demostrar que su asistencia beneficia su ocupación o negocio. 2010 tax No puede deducir los gastos de viaje de su familia. 2010 tax Si la convención es para propósitos políticos, sociales, de inversión o para otros fines que no estén relacionados con su ocupación o negocio, no puede deducir los gastos. 2010 tax Su nombramiento o elección como delegado no determina, en sí, si puede deducir gastos de viaje. 2010 tax Puede deducir gastos de viaje sólo si su asistencia se relaciona con su ocupación o negocio. 2010 tax Programa de la convención. 2010 tax   Normalmente, la agenda del día o programa de la convención muestra el propósito de la convención. 2010 tax Puede demostrar que su asistencia a la convención beneficia su ocupación o negocio comparando el programa con los deberes y responsabilidades oficiales de su puesto. 2010 tax No es necesario que el programa trate específicamente sobre sus deberes y responsabilidades oficiales; será suficiente si el programa se relaciona con su puesto de tal modo que muestre que su asistencia ha sido por negocios. 2010 tax Convenciones que tengan lugar fuera de América del Norte. 2010 tax    Vea el capítulo 1 de la Publicación 463, en inglés, para información sobre convenciones celebradas fuera de América del Norte. 2010 tax Gastos de Entretenimiento Es posible que pueda deducir gastos de entretenimiento relacionados con negocios en los que incurra al participar en actividades de entretenimiento de un cliente o empleado. 2010 tax Puede deducir gastos de entretenimiento sólo si son ordinarios y además necesarios (definidos anteriormente en la Introducción ) y cumple uno de los siguientes requisitos: El requisito de relación directa. 2010 tax El requisito de asociación. 2010 tax Ambos se explican en el capítulo 2 de la Publicación 463, en inglés. 2010 tax La cantidad que se puede deducir por concepto de gastos de entretenimiento puede ser limitada. 2010 tax Normalmente, se puede deducir sólo el 50% de los gastos de entretenimiento no reembolsados. 2010 tax Este límite se explica más adelante. 2010 tax Límite del 50% Normalmente, puede deducir sólo el 50% de los gastos de comidas y entretenimiento relacionados con los negocios. 2010 tax (Si está sujeto a los límites sobre “horas de servicio” del Departamento de Transporte, puede deducir el 80% de los gastos de comidas y entretenimiento relacionados con los negocios. 2010 tax Vea Personas sujetas a límites sobre “horas de servicio” , más adelante. 2010 tax ) El límite del 50% corresponde a empleados o sus empleadores y a personas que trabajen por cuenta propia (incluidos contratistas independientes) o sus clientes, dependiendo de si los gastos son reembolsados. 2010 tax La Figura 26-A resume las reglas generales explicadas en esta sección. 2010 tax El límite del 50% corresponde a comidas de negocios o gastos de entretenimiento en los que usted incurra mientras: Viaja lejos de su domicilio (igualmente si come a solas o con otras personas) por motivo de negocio, Entretiene a clientes en su lugar de negocio (el de usted), un restaurante u otro sitio o Asiste a una convención o recepción de negocios, reunión de negocios o almuerzo de negocios en un club. 2010 tax Gastos incluidos. 2010 tax   Los gastos sujetos al límite del 50% incluyen: Impuestos y propinas relacionados con comidas relacionadas con el negocio o actividades de entretenimiento, Cargos de admisión en un club nocturno, Cantidad pagada para alquilar una sala en la cual usted da una cena o cóctel y recibe a invitados y Cantidades pagadas por estacionamiento cerca de un estadio deportivo. 2010 tax No obstante, el costo de transporte de ida y vuelta de una comida o actividad de entretenimiento relacionada con los negocios no está sujeta al límite del 50%. 2010 tax Aplicación del límite del 50%. 2010 tax   El límite del 50% que corresponde a gastos de comida y entretenimiento se aplica si el gasto es, de otra manera, deducible y no está cubierto por una de las excepciones mencionadas más adelante en esta sección. 2010 tax   El límite del 50% también se aplica a ciertos gastos de comida y entretenimiento que no están relacionados con los negocios. 2010 tax Es aplicable a gastos de comida y entretenimiento incurridos para generar ingresos, incluyendo ingresos de alquileres o ingresos de regalías. 2010 tax Además, se aplica al costo de comidas incluidas en gastos educativos deducibles. 2010 tax Cuándo aplicar el límite del 50%. 2010 tax   Se aplica el límite del 50% después de determinar la cantidad que de otro modo reuniría los requisitos para una deducción. 2010 tax Primero tiene que determinar la cantidad de sus gastos de comida y entretenimiento que serían deducible conforme a las otras reglas presentadas en este capítulo. 2010 tax Ejemplo 1. 2010 tax Usted gasta $200 en una comida relacionada con los negocios. 2010 tax Si no se le permite deducir $110 de esa cantidad por ser excesiva y extravagante, los $90 sobrantes están sujetos al límite del 50%. 2010 tax La deducción no puede ser más de $45 (0. 2010 tax 50 x $90). 2010 tax Ejemplo 2. 2010 tax Usted compra dos boletos para un concierto y se los regala a un cliente. 2010 tax Compró los boletos por medio de un vendedor. 2010 tax Pagó $200 por los dos boletos, los cuales tenían un valor nominal de $80 cada uno ($160 en total). 2010 tax La deducción no puede ser más de $80 (0. 2010 tax 50 x $160). 2010 tax Excepciones al límite del 50% Normalmente, los gastos de comida y entretenimiento relacionados con los negocios están sujetos al límite del 50%. 2010 tax La Figura 26-A le puede ayudar a determinar si el límite del 50% le corresponde a usted. 2010 tax El gasto de comida o entretenimiento no está sujeto al límite del 50% si el gasto satisface una de las siguientes excepciones. 2010 tax Gastos reembolsados al empleado. 2010 tax   Si usted es empleado, no se le obliga aplicar el límite del 50% sobre tales gastos que su empleador le reembolsa conforme a un plan de reembolsos con rendición de cuentas. 2010 tax Los planes de reembolsos con rendición de cuentas se explican más adelante bajo Reembolsos . 2010 tax Personas sujetas a límites sobre “horas de servicio”. 2010 tax   Puede deducir un porcentaje mayor de sus gastos de comidas mientras viaja lejos de su domicilio tributario, si las comidas tienen lugar durante, o en relación con, algún período sujeto a los límites sobre “horas de servicio” del Departamento de Transporte. 2010 tax El porcentaje es el 80%. 2010 tax   Las personas sujetas a los límites sobre “horas de servicio” designados por el Departamento de Transporte incluyen las siguientes: Ciertos trabajadores de transporte aéreo (como pilotos, tripulación, despachadores, mecánicos y controladores aéreos) que se encuentran bajo el reglamento de la Administración Federal de Aviación. 2010 tax Camioneros interestatales y conductores de autobús que estén sujetos a las reglas del Departamento de Transporte. 2010 tax Ciertos empleados ferroviarios (como maquinistas, conductores, tripulaciones de tren, despachadores y personal de control de operaciones) que estén sujetos a las reglas de la Administración Federal Ferroviaria. 2010 tax Ciertos marineros mercantes que se encuentren bajo el reglamento de la Guardia Costera. 2010 tax Otras excepciones. 2010 tax   Además, hay excepciones para personas que trabajen por cuenta propia, para gastos de publicidad, la venta de comida o entretenimiento y eventos deportivos de beneficencia. 2010 tax Éstas se explican en la Publicación 463, en inglés. 2010 tax Figura 26-A. 2010 tax ¿Debe usted Aplicar el Límite del 50% a sus Gastos? Hay excepciones a estas reglas. 2010 tax Vea Excepciones al límite del 50% . 2010 tax Please click here for the text description of the image. 2010 tax Gastos de entretenimiento: límite del 50% ¿Qué Gastos de Entretenimiento se Pueden Deducir? Esta sección explica varios tipos de gastos de entretenimiento que usted tal vez pueda deducir. 2010 tax Entretenimiento. 2010 tax    El entretenimiento incluye toda actividad que se considere que provee entretenimiento, diversión o recreación. 2010 tax Algunos ejemplos de éstos son entretener a invitados en clubes nocturnos; en clubes sociales y deportivos; en teatros; en eventos deportivos; o en cacerías, viajes de pesca, vacaciones y viajes parecidos. 2010 tax Comidas como forma de entretenimiento. 2010 tax   El entretenimiento incluye el costo de una comida que usted le brinda a un cliente, independientemente de si la comida es parte de otro entretenimiento o si se trata sólo de dicha comida. 2010 tax Un gasto de comida incluye el costo de alimentos, bebidas, impuestos y propinas de comida. 2010 tax Para deducir una comida relacionada con entretenimiento, usted o su empleador tiene que estar presente cuando se provea la comida o bebida. 2010 tax No puede declarar el costo de la comida como gasto de entretenimiento y también como gasto de viaje. 2010 tax Separación de costos. 2010 tax   Si tiene un solo gasto que incluye costos de entretenimiento y otros servicios (tal como alojamiento o transporte), tiene que repartir dicho gasto entre el costo de entretenimiento y el costo de los otros servicios. 2010 tax Tiene que tener una razón justificable por hacer esta repartición. 2010 tax Por ejemplo, tiene que repartir los gastos si un hotel incluye en la misma cuenta cargos de entretenimiento en el bar junto con el cargo de habitación. 2010 tax Si se turnan para pagar comidas o entretenimiento. 2010 tax   Si un grupo de personas que se conocen por la relación de negocios se turnan para pagar las cuentas de comida o entretenimiento mutuas sin tener en cuenta si sirven para fines de negocios, ningún miembro del grupo puede deducir ninguna parte del gasto. 2010 tax Gastos exagerados o extravagantes. 2010 tax   No puede deducir gastos de comida que sean exagerados o extravagantes. 2010 tax Se considera que un gasto no es extravagante si es razonable basándose en los hechos y circunstancias. 2010 tax Los gastos en cuestión no serán denegados sólo porque son mayores que una cantidad fija en dólares o porque tienen lugar en restaurantes, hoteles, clubes nocturnos o complejos turísticos de lujo. 2010 tax Reuniones de asociaciones comerciales. 2010 tax    Puede deducir gastos de entretenimiento que estén directamente relacionados y sean necesarios para asistir a reuniones de negocios o convenciones de ciertas organizaciones exentas de impuestos, si los gastos de asistencia se relacionan con su ocupación o negocio activo. 2010 tax Estas organizaciones incluyen asociaciones comerciales, cámaras de comercio, juntas de bienes raíces, asociaciones comerciales y asociaciones profesionales. 2010 tax Entradas a eventos. 2010 tax   Normalmente, no puede deducir una cantidad superior al valor nominal de una entrada a un evento de entretenimiento, aunque haya pagado un precio más alto. 2010 tax Por ejemplo, no puede deducir cargos por servicios que pague a boleterías o agencias de venta de entradas ni cantidad alguna superior al valor nominal de las entradas que pague a revendedores ilegales. 2010 tax ¿Qué Gastos de Entretenimiento no se Pueden Deducir? Esta sección explica varios tipos de gastos de entretenimiento que normalmente no se pueden deducir. 2010 tax Cuotas de clubes y afiliaciones. 2010 tax   No puede deducir una cuota (incluidos cargos de admisión) por afiliación en ningún club organizado para: Negocios, Placer, Recreación u Otro propósito social. 2010 tax Esta regla le corresponde a toda organización de afiliados si uno de sus propósitos principales es: Dirigir actividades de entretenimiento para miembros o sus invitados o Hacer que los miembros o sus invitados tengan acceso a establecimientos de entretenimiento. 2010 tax   Los propósitos y actividades de un club, y no el nombre de éste, determinarán si usted puede deducir la cuota o no. 2010 tax No puede deducir una cuota pagada a: Clubes sociales (country clubs), Clubes de golf y deportivos, Clubes de líneas aéreas, Clubes de hoteles y Clubes administrados con el fin de proveer comidas bajo circunstancias que se consideran normalmente conducentes a conversaciones de negocios. 2010 tax Establecimientos de entretenimiento. 2010 tax   Normalmente, no puede deducir gasto alguno en el que se haya incurrido por el uso de un establecimiento de entretenimiento. 2010 tax Esto incluye gastos por depreciación y costos de operación tales como alquiler, servicios públicos, mantenimiento y protección. 2010 tax   Un establecimiento de entretenimiento es toda propiedad de la cual usted sea dueño, que alquile, o use con fines de entretenimiento. 2010 tax Algunos ejemplos son un yate, una cabaña de caza, un campamento de pesca, una piscina o alberca, una cancha de tenís, un centro de boliche, un automóvil, un avión, un apartamento, una habitación de hotel o una vivienda ubicada en un lugar turístico. 2010 tax Gastos de bolsillo. 2010 tax   Puede deducir gastos de bolsillo, tales como para comida y bebidas, servicios de banquetería, gas y cebo de pesca ofrecidos por usted durante un evento en un establecimiento de entretenimiento. 2010 tax Éstos no son gastos por el uso de un establecimiento de entretenimiento. 2010 tax No obstante, dichos gastos sí están sujetos a los requisitos de relación directa y asociación. 2010 tax Además, están sujetos al Límite del 50% explicado anteriormente. 2010 tax Información adicional. 2010 tax   Para más información acerca de los gastos de entretenimiento, incluyendo explicaciones sobre los requisitos de relación directa y asociación, vea el capítulo 2 de la Publicación 463, en inglés. 2010 tax Gastos por Regalos Si da regalos en el curso de su ocupación o negocio, puede deducir todo o parte del costo. 2010 tax Esta sección explica los límites y reglas para deducir el costo de regalos. 2010 tax Límite de los $25. 2010 tax   Usted no puede deducir más de $25 por concepto de regalos que, por motivos comerciales, usted da directa o indirectamente a cualquier persona en particular durante el año tributario. 2010 tax Un regalo dado a una empresa con la intención de que eventualmente sirva para el uso personal o el beneficio de una persona en particular, o de un grupo particular limitado, se considerará un regalo indirecto hecho a esa persona en particular o a las personas de aquella clase que reciban el regalo. 2010 tax   Si le da un regalo a un miembro de la familia de un cliente, se considera normalmente que el regalo es un regalo indirecto hecho al cliente. 2010 tax Esta regla no corresponde si tiene una relación de negocios independiente y de buena fe con dicho miembro de la familia, y el regalo no está destinado al uso o beneficio final del cliente. 2010 tax   Si tanto usted como su cónyuge dan regalos, a los dos se les trata como un solo contribuyente. 2010 tax No importa si tienen negocios distintos, empleos distintos, o si cada uno tiene una relación independiente con el destinatario. 2010 tax Si una sociedad colectiva hace regalos, a la sociedad colectiva y los socios se les trata como un solo contribuyente. 2010 tax Costos imprevistos. 2010 tax   Costos imprevistos, como el grabado de joyas, o el embalaje, seguro y envío, no se suelen incluir al determinar el costo de un regalo para propósitos del límite de los $25. 2010 tax   Un costo se considera imprevisto sólo si no añade valor sustancial al regalo. 2010 tax Por ejemplo, el costo usual de envolver un regalo es un costo imprevisto. 2010 tax Sin embargo, la compra de una canasta decorativa para embalar frutas no es un costo imprevisto si el valor de la canasta es considerable en comparación con el valor de la fruta. 2010 tax Excepciones. 2010 tax   Los siguientes artículos no se consideran regalos para propósitos del límite de los $25. 2010 tax Un artículo que cueste $4 o menos y: tenga su nombre, en forma permanente y claramente visible, en el regalo y sea uno de varios artículos idénticos que usted regala ampliamente. 2010 tax Ejemplos de éstos incluyen lapiceros o bolígrafos, juegos de escritorio, bolsas de plástico y estuches. 2010 tax Letreros, estantes de presentación u otros materiales de promoción que se van a usar en el lugar de negocios del destinatario. 2010 tax Regalo o entretenimiento. 2010 tax   Todo artículo que se pueda considerar regalo o entretenimiento normalmente se considerará entretenimiento. 2010 tax Sin embargo, si le regala a un cliente alimentos o bebidas envasados con la intención de que él los consuma en una fecha posterior, trátelos como regalo. 2010 tax    Si le regala a un cliente boletos para una función de teatro o evento deportivo y no acompaña al cliente a la función o evento, puede tratar los boletos como gasto por regalo o como gasto de entretenimiento, según le convenga más a usted. 2010 tax    Si acompaña al cliente al evento, tendrá que tratar el costo de los boletos como gasto de entretenimiento. 2010 tax Usted no puede escoger, en este caso, tratar los boletos como un gasto de regalo. 2010 tax Gastos de Transporte Esta sección explica gastos que puede deducir por concepto de transporte de negocios cuando no viaje lejos de su domicilio, definidos anteriormente, bajo Gastos de Viaje . 2010 tax Estos gastos incluyen el costo de transporte por avión, ferrocarril, autobús, taxi, etc. 2010 tax , y el costo de manejar y mantener en buen estado su automóvil. 2010 tax Los gastos de transporte incluyen todos los costos ordinarios y necesarios de lo siguiente: Trasladarse de un lugar de trabajo a otro en el curso de su negocio o profesión cuando viaje dentro del área de su domicilio tributario. 2010 tax (Domicilio tributario se define anteriormente bajo Gastos de Viaje . 2010 tax ) Visitar a clientes. 2010 tax Ir a una reunión de negocios lejos de su lugar de trabajo habitual. 2010 tax Trasladarse de su domicilio a un lugar de trabajo temporal cuando tenga uno o más lugares de trabajo habituales. 2010 tax Estos lugares de trabajo temporales pueden estar ubicados dentro del área de su domicilio tributario o fuera de dicha área. 2010 tax Los gastos de transporte no incluyen gastos en los que incurre al pasar una noche de viaje lejos de su domicilio. 2010 tax Esos gastos son gastos de viaje, los cuales se explican anteriormente. 2010 tax Sin embargo, si usa su automóvil mientras pasa la noche lejos de su domicilio, use las reglas de esta sección para calcular la deducción por gastos de automóvil. 2010 tax Vea Gastos de Automóvil , más adelante. 2010 tax Ilustración de gastos de transporte. 2010 tax    La Figura 26-B ilustra las reglas sobre cuándo puede deducir gastos de transporte cuando tiene un trabajo principal o habitual lejos de su domicilio. 2010 tax Tal vez quiera consultar dicha ilustración al momento de decidir si puede deducir sus gastos de transporte. 2010 tax Generalmente, los gastos de transporte en los que usted incurre diariamente mientras vi